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TUF
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15 Jan 2019, 8:07 pm

Temeraire wrote:
I think this may refer to Iceland buying 'bycatch' which is the unwanted fish that other stores do not want.

This is usually thrown back into the sea but it is either dead or half dead by the time it is so the fish doesn't survive. So about 40 % gets tossed back and wasted.

Iceland says it helps to save on over fishing and other environmental issues.

I suppose it is a bit like buying wonky veg - taste ok but just not desirable or isn't cod.


Interesting.

He said it about everything though. We went there and they ran out of Mexican and vegan stuff, our favourites, and they're not bringing it back. He thinks it's like TK Maxx. But unlike clothes, you can't say 'oh this food didn't sell so we'll pass it on to another supermarket' because it would rot... Which is why I'm wondering if he means the frozen stuff.

He could have just exaggerated it based on the bycatch thing.

I thought I heard somewhere that it isn't cod anymore anyway. I still prefer whatever that white fish in fish fingers is to regular greasy fish.

(I realise I sound like a chav lol, when it comes to food, clothes and the amount of £ in my bank account, I am)



Temeraire
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15 Jan 2019, 8:41 pm

We do like a fish finger don't we Fluffy?

Nothing wrong with counting the pennies Tuf.

I only get extravagant things when I have been given birthday or xmas money. Otherwise it is cheap and cheerful for me too.

I bought over 20 tins of tuna a few months ago because it was so cheap (reduced to clear). I know I eat it regularly so I got as many as I had money in my pocket.



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16 Jan 2019, 8:39 am

Temeraire wrote:

I bought over 20 tins of tuna a few months ago because it was so cheap (reduced to clear). I know I eat it regularly so I got as many as I had money in my pocket.


When I lived on my own my kitchen cupboards only had tins of tuna , sweetcorn , new potatoes and pasta.
I thought it was just being frugal but now think it was an ASD thing ( having the same meal every day for years :lol: )


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16 Jan 2019, 10:03 am

SaveFerris wrote:
Temeraire wrote:

I bought over 20 tins of tuna a few months ago because it was so cheap (reduced to clear). I know I eat it regularly so I got as many as I had money in my pocket.


When I lived on my own my kitchen cupboards only had tins of tuna , sweetcorn , new potatoes and pasta.
I thought it was just being frugal but now think it was an ASD thing ( having the same meal every day for years :lol: )


I have pork and mushroom curry today - which makes a change from pork roast dinners I have been eating for days.

I suppose if I like something I will eat it again and again but there does come a point where I fancy something else.

But I get what you are saying about the same tins in the cupboard. I go through phases I think.

There was a man where I worked, years ago, that had cheese sandwiches every day for lunch - I thought this was odd but I could have eaten tuna mayo everyday if I wanted to so very subjective I think.



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16 Jan 2019, 10:06 am

I wish we had tuna and sweetcorn in the US.....

In the old days, "corn," in the UK, used to refer to "grains" in general. Wheat would have been considered "corn." The "corn laws" applied to all grains grown in the UK

I don't believe that's the case in the UK today, though. Do you still call "corn-on-a-cob" maize?



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16 Jan 2019, 10:19 am

I refer to it as "corn-on-a-cob" , never heard it called anything else


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16 Jan 2019, 12:11 pm

Temeraire wrote:
We do like a fish finger don't we Fluffy?

fish fingers for tea :D with fried potatoes, beans, and chestnut mushrooms.



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16 Jan 2019, 1:26 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
I refer to it as "corn-on-a-cob" , never heard it called anything else


Me too. Lovely with butter.

I prefer having it in the sort of hot countries I can't go to anymore*, and in the streets then here and at home though.

*Light sensitivity



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16 Jan 2019, 2:27 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I wish we had tuna and sweetcorn in the US.....

In the old days, "corn," in the UK, used to refer to "grains" in general. Wheat would have been considered "corn." The "corn laws" applied to all grains grown in the UK

I don't believe that's the case in the UK today, though. Do you still call "corn-on-a-cob" maize?


Where I live in the US, grain sorghum is called maize. Corn is only called corn. When I'm talking to city people, I avoid using the word maize because they invariably think that I'm talking about corn.

Also, around here, it is "corn on the cob".

We do have sweetcorn. In my area, farmers only grow field corn because the primary use is to feed cattle in feedlots. On the other hand, in just about any private vegetable garden, you find sweetcorn, not field corn.

If you go to the grocery stores in my area, the corn on the cob that is usually found most of the year is brought in from Mexico and may be either sweet corn or field corn, but I think it is usually sweet corn.

When the local field corn is ripe, the grocery stores often sell locally grown field corn. Also, individual farmers will sometimes fill the back of their pickup or a trailer with ears of field corn and sell it on the streets. At our local church, when the field corn is at its best, local farmers will announce that the corn is ripe and invite all the church members to come over and pick corn for free in their field.



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16 Jan 2019, 5:10 pm

...I've actually read that American " corn-on-cob " corn - even if it's not on a cob, like canned corn? - tends to be seen more as " food for animals, not humans ", and eaten less in other countries. Not true 8O ?







Ferris"]I refer to it as "corn-on-a-cob" , never heard it called anything else[/quote]


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16 Jan 2019, 5:31 pm

Not even sure I know what corn is any more, after reading some of these posts.

Anyway, I love cornflakes, but can't stand sweetcorn.


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16 Jan 2019, 5:37 pm

ASS-P wrote:
Ferris wrote:
I refer to it as "corn-on-a-cob" , never heard it called anything else


...I've actually read that American " corn-on-cob " corn - even if it's not on a cob, like canned corn? - tends to be seen more as " food for animals, not humans ", and eaten less in other countries. Not true 8O ?


I'm not sure how much corn is consumed in the UK ( None in DeepHour's house , don't go for tea at his house :( ) but our supermarkets seem to sell a lot of it.


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16 Jan 2019, 5:47 pm

You could have a very tasty 'tea' consisting of Stella Artois, Roast Chicken crisps and fruit pastilles at my house, if I could get up in time to prepare it.


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16 Jan 2019, 5:52 pm

Corn is definitely eaten by humans here, and is offered as a side at takeaway joints and carveries.


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16 Jan 2019, 5:56 pm

DeepHour wrote:
You could have a very tasty 'tea' consisting of Stella Artois, Roast Chicken crisps and fruit pastilles at my house, if I could get up in time to prepare it.


The 'tea' of Champions , you are a legend DH :) I don't do normal times for food , my evening meal is now.


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