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kraftiekortie
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11 Jun 2019, 8:22 pm

For us in New York:

Morning meal: either Breakfast or Brunch

Noon meal: lunch

Evening meal: dinner or supper (more often supper when I was younger; then dinner when I got older).

Soda shops were sometimes called "Luncheonettes."



Misslizard
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11 Jun 2019, 8:52 pm

Breakfast,dinner or lunch,then supper.Refrigerator gets called an icebox,mostly by older folks.Guess I’m getting old, that’s what I called it when I was a kid.
Most don’t say the re in the beginning so it’s fridgerator.


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Trogluddite
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11 Jun 2019, 8:57 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
This different even in the UK

Morning meal - Breakfast

Midday ish meal - Lunch ( although is was dinner time in school )

Evening Meal - Tea

Not as heated as the "small, round individually-baked bread for making chip butties with" controversy though!
I should stick up for "bread-cakes" really as a Yorkshire resident, but I've always been a bit jealous of people who live in a "baps" area! :lol:


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DeepHour
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11 Jun 2019, 9:08 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
This different even in the UK

Morning meal - Breakfast

Midday ish meal - Lunch ( although is was dinner time in school )

Evening Meal - Tea



But upper-middle class types in the UK would call an early evening meal 'dinner' and a late evening meal 'supper', or at least that's the impression I've formed.


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SaveFerris
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11 Jun 2019, 9:35 pm

Misslizard wrote:
Most don’t say the re in the beginning so it’s fridgerator.


I don't even use the ator , it's a fridge to me


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Darmok
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11 Jun 2019, 9:40 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
This different even in the UK

Morning meal - Breakfast

Midday ish meal - Lunch ( although is was dinner time in school )

Evening Meal - Tea

Image


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kraftiekortie
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11 Jun 2019, 10:39 pm

I usually call it “fridge”, too.

Some older people call it the Frigidaire (a brand name)

Like calling the vacuum cleaner the “Hoover.”



madbutnotmad
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11 Jun 2019, 10:51 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
fanny

Does it mean something different in USA? Umm. I know what it means here!


It usually refers to the posterior in the US , a bum bag here is called a fanny pack there.

And. in danger of sounding rude or obscene. Fanny in the UK also refers to the vagina.

So, when someone says "put it in your fanny", it is hilarious for people from the UK....



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11 Jun 2019, 11:08 pm

Questions for the Brits:
How old does a guy have to be to qualify as a "bloke"?
I would say adult, although in some areas of the UK, younger woman may refer to their boy friends as "their bloke".

How old does a bloke have to be to no longer qualify as a "lad"?
I would say this is relative and regional. In Liverpool, the word lad or la (shortened) can be used to refer to your friends / mates. In other areas it refers to teenagers/kids. The term can also be used by older people referring to younger men.
In some cases, the term can be derogatory, for example. if someone the same age as me or younger, called me a lad, it would be condescending, talking down to me as an attempt to belittle me (treating me as their inferior or as a child even though it is clear that i am not).

How old does a lad have to be to no longer call it his "willy"?
I would say that it isn't an age thing, but more of a manner. I would also say that using the term willy is perhaps more polite that other words commonly used.

So in some circumstances the word willy may be used, in other circumstances more graphic words may be used, by the same person. Again, this can be determined by circumstance or by general level of manners.
In some rough areas, using graphic swear words is extremely common.

I grew up and live in a small island that is generally conservative with regards to manners. I also spent 3 years living n the North of England, in a city called Liverpool. Where people use swear words more often.

It was a bit of a culture shock when i first got to Liverpool, when i asked directions from a nice old lady who replied using several swear words in conversation. After living in Liverpool, i found that using swear words were common among some of the residents and much more common than in my home island.



Trogluddite
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11 Jun 2019, 11:18 pm

Darmok wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
This different even in the UK

Morning meal - Breakfast

Midday ish meal - Lunch ( although is was dinner time in school )

Evening Meal - Tea

Image

Among posher Brits, that would be called "elevenses" (because you have it at 11 o'clock.)
The rest of us call it a "tea break", if the boss is kind enough to let us have one!


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Redxk
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11 Jun 2019, 11:41 pm

It took me a very long time to figure out that to "take the Mickey out" or just "take the mick" meant to make fun of someone. Does anyone know the origin of this?



naturalplastic
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12 Jun 2019, 1:06 am

DeepHour wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:

And a "bloke" equals a "guy" in American.




Can't 'guys' also include females in American parlance?


Yeah, sometimes Americans stretch the meaning to include women sometimes.



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12 Jun 2019, 1:09 am

Redxk wrote:
It took me a very long time to figure out that to "take the Mickey out" or just "take the mick" meant to make fun of someone. Does anyone know the origin of this?


Never heard that expression.


I have heard of "slipping someone a mickey" ( ie putting a knockout pill in their drink). Short for "slipping you a Mickey Finn". The obvious origin of that being the fact that there was a famous turn of the 20th Century Irish American boxer named "Mickey Finn" who was famous for throwing knockout punches.



Trueno
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12 Jun 2019, 1:14 am

Taking the mick is quite common here... I don't know where it originated.

I'll bet Trogluddite knows.


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12 Jun 2019, 1:45 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
For us in New York:

Morning meal: either Breakfast or Brunch

Noon meal: lunch

Evening meal: dinner or supper (more often supper when I was younger; then dinner when I got older).

Soda shops were sometimes called "Luncheonettes."







...When visiting my mother's East Texas family, away from my NYC suburbs home...the afternoon meal in East Texas was dinner, the evening meal supper.
People would say " fixing " - or " fixin' " :) - meaning " preparing '...I'm fixin' to come over " - but I don't know that, 50 years later, anyone says it anymore.
Another Texas-ism is " directly " - which, in fact, means ' not exactly now ' - " I'll be over directly " :D ! Like " Soon come " in Jamaca :wink: ?


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