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ASS-P
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12 Jun 2019, 2:16 am

...I've noticed that " estate " means I guess any single-family/personnhouse in British, " middle-class estates ", even " council estates " in the UK for (houses, not apartments)bfor " the projects/county housing " here.
" Knocked up " means " I'll come around/see you " in the Commonwealth...in the USA, well! 8) It means " get pregnant ' abd rather unplannedly/surprisingly so :wink: ! It's rather dated now, sort of of the Elvis Presley/Connie Francis era.
" F"g " (censored) has a meaning of " cigarette " in Brit - and from that, " f*gg*d out " for " exhausted, like a used-up cigarette " - But, funny enough, I could swear I've seen that " f*gg*d out " usage in, um, " older " (pre-60s) American writing! :?
I guess an " off-liscence " in Brit is what gets sorta blandly called a " convenience store " here, especially for big chains (like 7-11 or AM)PM? :? I read of " the high street " in British stuff - The shipping/business district :? ?
" Scheme " is always at least lightly/humorously.pejorative in American " - in Brit it seems just ewivalent to " plan/concept " as a noun. My father, who subscribed to the Manchester Guardian's international weekly edition in the post-World War II era, said that the area that a House of Commons member represented was a " posting " there - a House of Representatives member represents a " district " here. This was 70 years ago, so :? ...
A " suburb " in American is a place outside ofa big city that I'd not in the city itself- I grew up in Chappaqua, a suburb of New York City (Yonkers and Farmingdale are I suppose better-known) - but in British, a suburb is an outer part of a big city but inside the limits of the city - Kraftiekortie, were you a Limey you might be a suburbanite :P ! So there.


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Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


ASS-P
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12 Jun 2019, 2:39 am

..." Estate " would pretty much exclusively, I think, be the home of someone HIGHLY upper-income/status in American -!a last name like Rockefeller or Gates. Oh, some developer might call some place he's selling houses in " Les Titzie-Ritzie Estates " :D, but that's just advertising talk.
People say " hella " a lot in California - from " hell of a. Lot " but more affectionate :? ? " I love you hella much ". Speaking of California-associated phrases...what about the surfer/etc.-type " dude " 8O ? In the movie " Easy Rider " 50 years ago there"s a bit of a gag around Jack Nicolson's character being taught that by Fonda & Hopper - so I suppose it was pretty newbthen :? .
Soda is " tonic " in Bahs-Tan :D I guess. " Telerecording " is Brit for " kinescope " here - this archaic 50s/60s technology that live (and nearly thus) TV broadcasts were preserved on; not considered real high-quality to-day - Old Edward R. Murrow and Elvis Presley TV appearances and those 60s Doctor Who episodes were preserved on them. I could be wrong, but it seems to me that almost any comics story is a " comic strip " in Brit, while a much bigger distinction tended to be - drawn!l :lol: - in American between a comic strip, meaning the format that appeared in daily newspapers and " comic book " was a nagazine's comics stories - and a modern copy of Action Comics or Archie is hardly a " book " now anyway :x !


_________________
Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


ASPartOfMe
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12 Jun 2019, 3:45 am

I though lad in the UK referred to alcoholic, misogynistic young men, someone like Noel Gallagher of the band Oasis.


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ASS-P
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12 Jun 2019, 3:54 am

:lol:

ASPartOfMe wrote:
I though lad in the UK referred to alcoholic, misogynistic young men, someone like Noel Gallagher of the band Oasis.






..." "'Eee's a bit'a a lad, innit' he? " :)
Those soft softcore nudie pictures and rude jokes (Ooh-er Missus! :lol: ) magazines from the late Nineties (FHIM, Maxim) were called " lad's magazines/ ladmags '..." laddies ".


_________________
Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


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12 Jun 2019, 4:00 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
I though lad in the UK referred to alcoholic, misogynistic young men, someone like Noel Gallagher of the band Oasis.


It can do in certain circumstances, eg in phrases like 'laddish culture', 'laddish behaviour' or just 'laddishness', but the word 'lad' itself is mostly used in a fairly neutral or sympathetic way, eg 'He's a nice lad' etc.


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12 Jun 2019, 4:02 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
The "WC" (water closet) is the universal, especially European, term for the Loo, bathroom, restroom, toilet, etc.





...It makes me think of Jack Paar :lol: :P ! 8)


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Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


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12 Jun 2019, 4:11 am

Mountain Goat wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
Here in Wales it is just as common to use 1st and 2nd floors.


Yeah , I've just had this debate with my GF


The "Ground floor" and the "First floor" above it is an English thing I believe. Not sure... It doesn't help when my local council run multistory car park has two floors lablelled with the same floor number... Is a bit wierd when one climbs the stairs and stops for a rest or slows down... Then climbs again to see the same floor number! I think it does it in the lift as well, but I don't use the lift. I don't like them. I tend to not like confined spaces like that, and besides, when I was in my late teens to early 20's three times I was stuck in lifts all in seperate locations. I avoid lifts and also esculators that go downhill which means certain places I tend to avoid if theh have no normal stairs. One shop has a choice of lift or esculator and my Mum insists I go up because she wants to buy trousers or something and needs me to look. (I rarely ever get new clothes as I like the ones I have... I'd rather patch my comfy old ones up). Anyway. I am a little nurvous while up there because I know I need to use either the lift or the esculator to get back down, and I use the esculator objectively. Going up on an escilator isn't too bad. Is going down I don't like... with all those people coming up towards you... :lol:









..." Shop " is more British, " store " more American.


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Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


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12 Jun 2019, 4:28 am

...The kind of residential, rather upper-ish class, boarding school that is called a " prrp school " in the USA is a " public school " in Blighty - although it's ANYTHING BUT " public " by the American definition! 8O would a " public school " in American be a " state school " in Brit :? ? I read something in a British political magazine regarding your possibile next PM, Boris Johnson 8O - it quoted someone who went to university (Oxford) at the same time as Boris who, unlike Boris, was a " state school " boy, the writer put it - I guess poorer and went to an Smerican-definition " public school (He didn't like Boris :( ).


_________________
Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


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12 Jun 2019, 4:36 am

Yes, 'State School' is the general term for a publicly funded school over here. In the 11-18 age group, most of them are 'Comprehensive Schools', ie they don't select pupils on ability grounds, though there are still about 150+ of the old 'Grammar Schools', which require pupils to pass the Eleven Plus exam to qualify for entry.


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12 Jun 2019, 4:37 am

madbutnotmad wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
fanny

Does it mean something different in USA? Umm. I know what it means here!


It usually refers to the posterior in the US , a bum bag here is called a fanny pack there.

And. in danger of sounding rude or obscene. Fanny in the UK also refers to the vagina.

So, when someone says "put it in your fanny", it is hilarious for people from the UK....
There's also "bottom". 'Soft as a baby's bottom" is a popular American expression.


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12 Jun 2019, 4:41 am

DeepHour wrote:
Yes, 'State School' is the general term for a publicly funded school over here. In the 11-18 age group, most of them are 'Comprehensive Schools', ie they don't select pupils on ability grounds, though there are still about 150+ of the old 'Grammar Schools', which require pupils to pass the Eleven Plus exam to qualify for entry.

Q






...Were/are " grammar schools " different and lower in status than the " public schools ' :? ?


_________________
Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


SaveFerris
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12 Jun 2019, 4:44 am

ASS-P wrote:
I guess an " off-liscence " in Brit is what gets sorta blandly called a " convenience store " here, especially for big chains (like 7-11 or AM)PM? :?


off license or 'offie' is equivalent to your liquor stores - mainly booze & fags for sale

Quote:
I'm going down the offie to get 10 Bensons and a bottle of Thunderbird Red - do you want anything


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12 Jun 2019, 5:02 am

ASS-P wrote:
...Were/are " grammar schools " different and lower in status than the " public schools ' :? ?



I can't speak for Grammar Schools in the present era, as I've no experience of them, but certainly in the post-war period up to perhaps the mid-1980s, the best Grammar Schools were very good indeed, probably every bit as good as any Public School in academic terms. After 1986, the old Grammar School exam system ('O Levels' and 'A Levels') was abolished, and the Grammars followed the same curriculum and exam system as the Comps (GCSEs and dumbed down A Levels). As a result, standards fell a great deal, I believe.

In terms of 'social status', the Grammars are lower in general, but not everyone in this country cares much about that.

In the 1970s, I attended a Direct Grant Grammar School, which was a mainly publicly funded school with more autonomy for the headmaster and governors. These were probably the best schools this country has ever had, but their status was abolished in the late 1970s. Many became Independent, fee-paying establishments.


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ASS-P
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12 Jun 2019, 5:15 am

SaveFerris wrote:
ASS-P wrote:
I guess an " off-liscence " in Brit is what gets sorta blandly called a " convenience store " here, especially for big chains (like 7-11 or AM)PM? :?


off license or 'offie' is equivalent to your liquor stores - mainly booze & fags for sale

Quote:
I'm going down the offie to get 10 Bensons and a bottle of Thunderbird Red - do you want anything









...I wrote out a response to you and, nearly finished, lost the draft :cry: . Twice :cry: . And, it's nearly 3:15 AM, I'mmin my shelter bunk, I'm straining my eyes, I have to get some sleep, this is running out of juice :( ...


_________________
Renal kidney failure, congestive heart failure, COPD. Can't really get up from a floor position unhelped anymore:-(.
One of the walking wounded ~ SMASHED DOWN by life and age, now prevented from even expressing myself! SOB.
" Oh, no! First you have to PROVE you deserve to go away to college! " ~ My mother, 1978 (the heyday of Andy Gibb and Player). I would still like to go.:-(
My life destroyed by Thorazine and Mellaril - and rape - and the Psychiatric/Industrial Complex. SOB:-(! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !! !!


SaveFerris
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12 Jun 2019, 5:19 am

ASS-P wrote:
SaveFerris wrote:
ASS-P wrote:
I guess an " off-liscence " in Brit is what gets sorta blandly called a " convenience store " here, especially for big chains (like 7-11 or AM)PM? :?


off license or 'offie' is equivalent to your liquor stores - mainly booze & fags for sale

Quote:
I'm going down the offie to get 10 Bensons and a bottle of Thunderbird Red - do you want anything


...I wrote out a response to you and, nearly finished, lost the draft :cry: . Twice :cry: . And, it's nearly 3:15 AM, I'mmin my shelter bunk, I'm straining my eyes, I have to get some sleep, this is running out of juice :( ...


Get some kip dude :)

kip = sleep


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