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Gammeldans
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23 Jul 2022, 3:56 am

What does "get out of your head!" refer to?
I hear it being used in acting.
It sounds like "stop analyzing!" to me.
Does this mean that when people say "get out of your head!" they stop analyzing or...?
Is this some kind of American expression?
I don't understand this term. Americans seem to understand it.



naturalplastic
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23 Jul 2022, 6:25 am

I am a native born American, and I have NEVER heard anyone say that - not that I consciously remember.

But if someone were to throw that phrase at me I would probably understand it to mean "get out of your thoughts/fantasies, and observe the reality around you". Something like that.

"Pay attention!".



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23 Jul 2022, 9:04 am

I'm in the UK. I've heard people say "he/she gets in your head". I take that to mean the a certain person likes to get inside your head. So with what you are saying perhaps it's something you would say in response to a person who gets in your head.


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naturalplastic
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23 Jul 2022, 12:01 pm

babybird wrote:
I'm in the UK. I've heard people say "he/she gets in your head". I take that to mean the a certain person likes to get inside your head. So with what you are saying perhaps it's something you would say in response to a person who gets in your head.


Then you would say "get out of my head".



AprilR
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23 Jul 2022, 12:12 pm

Maybe they mean to say "stop over thinking"



babybird
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23 Jul 2022, 12:13 pm

No :lol:

I'm just trying to work out what the op means

@naturalplastic


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Matrix Glitch
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23 Jul 2022, 1:06 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
I am a native born American, and I have NEVER heard anyone say that - not that I consciously remember.


Perhaps it's an "as kids say these days" thing.



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23 Jul 2022, 1:08 pm

I asked my dear old friend Dr. Google and got the following:

What Does It Mean to Get Out of Your Head? (A Definition) If being in your head means overthinking or overanalyzing a situation, getting out of your head means being present in the moment and letting go of the unhelpful thoughts. If you get out of your head, it's more likely that you'll be happier than before.

What does it mean to get to your head?
If something that you have achieved goes to your head, it makes you too proud: Fame and fortune had gone to his head.

Get Out of Your Head: Stopping the Spiral of Toxic Thoughts
Book by Jennie Allen



naturalplastic
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23 Jul 2022, 2:13 pm

Your Google agrees with AprilR, that it means "stop over thinking". Get into the moment.

Makes sense.



Last edited by naturalplastic on 23 Jul 2022, 2:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

KitLily
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23 Jul 2022, 2:15 pm

I thought it meant, stop all the overthinking and actually do something physical. Get out of the mental realm and into the physical realm.


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23 Jul 2022, 2:18 pm

Yeah it makes sense now. It didn't before.


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naturalplastic
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23 Jul 2022, 2:59 pm

KitLily wrote:
I thought it meant, stop all the overthinking and actually do something physical. Get out of the mental realm and into the physical realm.


Could mean that too.



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23 Jul 2022, 5:35 pm

When directors and acting coaches used "Get out of your head" on my classmates and I, it was usually followed by the phrase “and get back into the scene!”. They wanted us to live in the scene, not just hit our marks and recite our lines.

In the non-acting world, it could mean things like:

• Consider something from a perspective other than your own.

• Forget your fears, hates, and prejudices (for once).

• "Get a life".

• “Keep an open mind (so I can tell you what to think)”.

• Stop day-dreaming.

• Stop dwelling on the past.

• Stop obsessing over one thing.

• Stop over-analyzing everything.

• “Turn on, tune in, drop out.”

• "Wake up and smell the coffee."



KitLily
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24 Jul 2022, 5:25 am

Fnord wrote:
In the non-acting world, it could mean things like:

• Consider something from a perspective other than your own.

• Forget your fears, hates, and prejudices (for once).

• "Get a life".

• “Keep an open mind (so I can tell you what to think)”.

• Stop day-dreaming.

• Stop dwelling on the past.

• Stop obsessing over one thing.

• Stop over-analyzing everything.

• “Turn on, tune in, drop out.”

• "Wake up and smell the coffee."


Not many of those mean much, do they :lol:


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24 Jul 2022, 8:32 am

Another take on the phrase "get out of your head!" may mean they want you to display some sort of emotional response. I'm always being accused of giving thought out logical responses to people when apparently what they sometimes want is a hug or some sort of emotional validation.


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24 Jul 2022, 3:43 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
babybird wrote:
I'm in the UK. I've heard people say "he/she gets in your head". I take that to mean the a certain person likes to get inside your head. So with what you are saying perhaps it's something you would say in response to a person who gets in your head.


Then you would say "get out of my head".
Or you'd be singing an Ashlee Simpson song :mrgreen:


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