It is "Dr Pepper", not "Dr. Pepper"

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DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 9:51 am

KitLily wrote:
The Cambridge Dictionary says this:

Dr is British English.
Dr. is American English.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/dr

So it looks like they both mean Doctor. Maybe Dr Pepper shouldn't be using Dr or Dr. at all :lol: :P


In English, any and all abbreviations (like Dr.) require a period/full-stop at the end.



Sonic200
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08 Aug 2022, 9:53 am

Walmart has Dr Thunder. They originally called it Southern Lightning and then some time they changed its name to Dr Thunder.



DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 10:00 am

Sonic200 wrote:
Walmart has Dr Thunder. They originally called it Southern Lightning and then some time they changed its name to Dr Thunder.


Actually, Its Dr. Thunder - not Dr Thunder :D
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Last edited by DanielW on 08 Aug 2022, 10:06 am, edited 3 times in total.

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08 Aug 2022, 10:02 am

Sonic200 wrote:
Walmart has Dr Thunder. They originally called it Southern Lightning and then some time they changed its name to Dr Thunder.


Both are derived from "White Lightening". The name for illegal whiskey brewed in stills in the mountains. Also known as "mountain dew" (a term also appropriated for a brand of nonalcoholic soft drink).



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08 Aug 2022, 10:16 am

DanielW wrote:
KitLily wrote:
The Cambridge Dictionary says this:

Dr is British English.
Dr. is American English.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/dr

So it looks like they both mean Doctor. Maybe Dr Pepper shouldn't be using Dr or Dr. at all :lol: :P


In English, any and all abbreviations (like Dr.) require a period/full-stop at the end.


But British English and American English are different. Hence why British authors often write in American English- because the largest reading market is American. It is a nightmare tbh. I wish all the forms of English would merge and be the same :?


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DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 10:23 am

KitLily wrote:
DanielW wrote:
KitLily wrote:
The Cambridge Dictionary says this:

Dr is British English.
Dr. is American English.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/dr

So it looks like they both mean Doctor. Maybe Dr Pepper shouldn't be using Dr or Dr. at all :lol: :P


In English, any and all abbreviations (like Dr.) require a period/full-stop at the end.


But British English and American English are different. Hence why British authors often write in American English- because the largest reading market is American. It is a nightmare tbh. I wish all the forms of English would merge and be the same :?


The rule is the same in US, UK, and AU etc ...its not always followed but it is still technically correct. I agree it should be standardized though (or perhaps standardised?) :D



DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 10:33 am

Sonic200 wrote:
Plenty of people think the drinks name is spelled with a period. But, no. It is "Dr Pepper". There is no period.


I just checked to see if they changed the trademark when they dropped the "." from the label. They have NOT, so it is still Dr. Pepper with a "." So it looks like those people are correct after all. :D



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08 Aug 2022, 10:34 am

DanielW wrote:
The rule is the same in US, UK, and AU etc ...its not always followed but it is still technically correct. I agree it should be standardized though (or perhaps standardised?) :D


But that link I posted from the dictionary says it's different: Dr is British English. Dr. is American English. I work with this problem every day as an editor.

It should definitely be standardised or standardized shouldn't it. Words should be spelled how they sound. What about all those 'ough' words:

cough
brought
bough
dough
lough
rough
borough
etc.

^^How non English speakers understand those is mind boggling! 8O


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DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 10:38 am

KitLily wrote:
DanielW wrote:
The rule is the same in US, UK, and AU etc ...its not always followed but it is still technically correct. I agree it should be standardized though (or perhaps standardised?) :D


But that link I posted from the dictionary says it's different: Dr is British English. Dr. is American English. I work with this problem every day as an editor.

It should definitely be standardised or standardized shouldn't it. Words should be spelled how they sound. What about all those 'ough' words:

cough
brought
bough
dough
lough
rough
borough
etc.

^^How non English speakers understand those is mind boggling! 8O


Again, it depends on the dictionary - Cambridge vs. Oxford vs. Webster vs. The Australian National :D

S or Z, and there are words that end in an ed or a t, not to mention slang and idioms unique to all of the English variants.



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08 Aug 2022, 10:46 am

DanielW wrote:
Again, it depends on the dictionary - Cambridge vs. Oxford vs. Webster etc. :D


American and British publishers stick with the rule I stated too. I've worked for both, I have to obey their rules to the letter. :thumleft:


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DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 10:49 am

KitLily wrote:
DanielW wrote:
Again, it depends on the dictionary - Cambridge vs. Oxford vs. Webster etc. :D


American and British publishers stick with the rule I stated too. I've worked for both, I have to obey their rules to the letter. :thumleft:


I used to write documentation for software sold internationally, and the hardest part was writing for all of the separate English versions.



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08 Aug 2022, 10:54 am

DanielW wrote:
KitLily wrote:
American and British publishers stick with the rule I stated too. I've worked for both, I have to obey their rules to the letter. :thumleft:


I used to write documentation for software sold internationally, and the hardest part was writing for all of the separate English versions.


Yes...tell me about it. Americans can't understand British English for some reason. They say 'it's full of typos.' :wall: And all the different punctuation conventions e.g. comma splices. :huh:


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Sonic200
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08 Aug 2022, 10:58 am

Doctor Who avoids the issue of whether or not to use a period by just writing out "Doctor" in full.



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08 Aug 2022, 11:03 am

Sonic200 wrote:
Doctor Who avoids the issue of whether or not to use a period by just writing out "Doctor" in full.


Yes, maybe we should go back to calling people Doctor, Mister, Mistress etc. Why not? 8)


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DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 11:04 am

That actually makes a lot of sense



DanielW
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08 Aug 2022, 11:06 am

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