Bilingual+ WPers, what language do you think in?

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CockneyRebel
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01 Dec 2023, 9:18 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


You speak German? 8O


Bits and pieces.


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CockneyRebel
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01 Dec 2023, 9:23 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


But you dont speak German. So how could you be able to "think in it"?


By watching German films with subtitles and listening to old German songs with subtitles on YouTube.


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01 Dec 2023, 10:39 pm

I asked my mother
She's been speaking English for the past 20 years, so she thinks in English, except for terms that don't have an English equivalent.

Her native language is Indonesian, which she often mixes with English in conversations with people who also speak Indonesian



traven
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02 Dec 2023, 2:13 am

westerns on tv were german spoken (crudely)



short

colombo in german

daktari


french


while the dutch tv only does subtitles



traven
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02 Dec 2023, 3:00 am

thinking in old fashion dutch, old people fashion french and english<old fashion i suppose
- back then the aussie uncles spoke funny dutch, i -we- must be speaking funny dutch now :nerdy:



naturalplastic
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02 Dec 2023, 9:10 am

CockneyRebel wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


But you dont speak German. So how could you be able to "think in it"?


By watching German films with subtitles and listening to old German songs with subtitles on YouTube.


you're just thinking in English sentences with German words plugged in as substitutes for English words.
Thats a far cry from "thinking in German".

The German language "works" totally differently than English. Different grammar. The plurals work differently. Nouns have sexual gender (masculine, Feminine, or neuter). And the verbs have to agree with the genders, and much more.

If you're drawn to German culture you ought to take an actual course in German 101 to really get your feet wet to see if you want to progress to the deep end of Germanophilia.



CockneyRebel
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02 Dec 2023, 9:37 am

naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


But you dont speak German. So how could you be able to "think in it"?


By watching German films with subtitles and listening to old German songs with subtitles on YouTube.


you're just thinking in English sentences with German words plugged in as substitutes for English words.
Thats a far cry from "thinking in German".

The German language "works" totally differently than English. Different grammar. The plurals work differently. Nouns have sexual gender (masculine, Feminine, or neuter). And the verbs have to agree with the genders, and much more.

If you're drawn to German culture you ought to take an actual course in German 101 to really get your feet wet to see if you want to progress to the deep end of Germanophilia.


I've been thinking about doing that. The trouble is that schooling costs money and there's very little of it in Canada these days.


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bee33
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02 Dec 2023, 9:44 am

I only think in English, which technically is not my first language because I didn't learn it until I was 6. I speak Italian and Portuguese very well (rusty in Portuguese, and not good at writing it) but I never think in them.

Though a lot of my thinking isn't necessarily in words.



MaxE
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02 Dec 2023, 1:18 pm

CockneyRebel wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


But you dont speak German. So how could you be able to "think in it"?


By watching German films with subtitles and listening to old German songs with subtitles on YouTube.


you're just thinking in English sentences with German words plugged in as substitutes for English words.
Thats a far cry from "thinking in German".

The German language "works" totally differently than English. Different grammar. The plurals work differently. Nouns have sexual gender (masculine, Feminine, or neuter). And the verbs have to agree with the genders, and much more.

If you're drawn to German culture you ought to take an actual course in German 101 to really get your feet wet to see if you want to progress to the deep end of Germanophilia.


I've been thinking about doing that. The trouble is that schooling costs money and there's very little of it in Canada these days.

Meiner Meinung nach, wenn CockneyRebel sagt daß er auf Deutsch denkt, also denkt er allerdings auf Deutsch, du Lümmel!


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JustFoundHere
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02 Dec 2023, 4:24 pm

For teh longest item, I've sometimes thought in non-English words - as non-English words (more often than not) may do better jobs in describing those elusive concepts than the English language itself.

Examples of non-English words that are "thought favorites":

- The German word 'fisselig' (pronounced as "fhistle fish" ) conveys a temporary state of inexactitude and sloppiness that is elicited by another person's nagging.

- The Japanese concept of 'hikikomori', which describes a state of complete withdrawal from society and social isolation. The Japanese concept of "hikikomori" is familliar with people concerned with the Autism Spectrum.

- The German word 'schadenfreude' is the experience of pleasure, joy, or self-satisfaction that comes from learning of or witnessing the troubles, failures, pain, or humiliation of another. The word 'schadenfreude' has gained interest in English speaking countries.

* From the book, 'They Have a Word for It.'



funeralxempire
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02 Dec 2023, 4:32 pm

CockneyRebel wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


You speak German? 8O


Bits and pieces.


Cool.

I know some phrases in a few different languages, but not enough to claim I speak any of them.


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naturalplastic
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02 Dec 2023, 5:49 pm

JustFoundHere wrote:
For teh longest item, I've sometimes thought in non-English words - as non-English words (more often than not) may do better jobs in describing those elusive concepts than the English language itself.

Examples of non-English words that are "thought favorites":

- The German word 'fisselig' (pronounced as "fhistle fish" ) conveys a temporary state of inexactitude and sloppiness that is elicited by another person's nagging.

- The Japanese concept of 'hikikomori', which describes a state of complete withdrawal from society and social isolation. The Japanese concept of "hikikomori" is familliar with people concerned with the Autism Spectrum.

- The German word 'schadenfreude' is the experience of pleasure, joy, or self-satisfaction that comes from learning of or witnessing the troubles, failures, pain, or humiliation of another. The word 'schadenfreude' has gained interest in English speaking countries.

* From the book, 'They Have a Word for It.'


Yes. Thats one of those books I like to read in the book store but am too cheap to actually buy. "They Have a Word For it". Interesting.

Like the word "obi" in Japanese that means "an imperfection that makes something perfect".

Could be for a hand made tea cup or painting or ...a lover. "Your perfect imperfections" as John Legend sang.

But thats just plugging a word into a sentence. Its not "thinking in another language".

I sometimes count in Spanish, or us expressions like "no tengo nada".



MatchboxVagabond
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02 Dec 2023, 6:39 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
CockneyRebel wrote:
I find myself thinking in German a lot.


But you dont speak German. So how could you be able to "think in it"?


By watching German films with subtitles and listening to old German songs with subtitles on YouTube.


you're just thinking in English sentences with German words plugged in as substitutes for English words.
Thats a far cry from "thinking in German".

The German language "works" totally differently than English. Different grammar. The plurals work differently. Nouns have sexual gender (masculine, Feminine, or neuter). And the verbs have to agree with the genders, and much more.

If you're drawn to German culture you ought to take an actual course in German 101 to really get your feet wet to see if you want to progress to the deep end of Germanophilia.

English word order is frequently valid German word order. A massive chunk of English grammar came from Germany originally.



WirSindDasVolk
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02 Dec 2023, 10:27 pm

My native language is English, but I speak Cantonese with my wife a lot, so I sometimes think in Cantonese. When we're outside together, we often use Cantonese to talk about things without others understanding, so if I'm outside and something surprising happens, my first reaction is usually in Cantonese, even when I'm by myself. For example, if I'm driving and someone gets too close to me, I'll automatically say 喂你做乜柒呀 (wtf are you doing).

I've realized, though, that my thoughts aren't really in any language. Sometimes when I'm speaking English, I know exactly what I'm thinking, but I have trouble putting it into words. Also, if I'm speaking another language, I put my thoughts directly into that language without going through English, and if I use a specific foreign language a lot, then sometimes I can think of how to phrase an idea in that language but not in English. For any language that I speak, I've realized it takes a bit of effort to put my thoughts into words, and this can make it difficult to talk about very technical topics, even when I understand them well.


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ocean
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03 Dec 2023, 5:21 pm

i speak German everyday but i think in English cuz thats the first language i learned

MaxE wrote:
du Lümmel!


:P


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funeralxempire
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03 Dec 2023, 6:46 pm

MatchboxVagabond wrote:
English word order is frequently valid German word order. A massive chunk of English grammar came from Germany originally.


Strictly speaking, English grammar doesn't come from German grammar, but as both are Germanic languages they share some similarities.


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