Does anyone find conversations tiring?

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shortfatbalduglyman
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15 May 2019, 9:31 pm

Manipulative

They call themselves "people", . Like they overpower you. Because they outnumber you. But there is just one of them. Singular. Not plural

Leash Law

"Are you ok", like they are a hero

But they don't have the authority or skill to "help" you

They act like you have a moral obligation to say "thank you"

Expectations that I didn't even know I had, violated

Homophobia



DemophobicKlingon
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08 Jul 2019, 4:46 am

Conversations in topics that I find interesting can be enjoyable. People who constantly want to talk including when I'm not in the mood, there is probably going to be a miscommunication between me and people who have a need for constant social interaction sooner or later because we have completely opposite needs.

Social interaction and conversation can be pretty draining in general. In group conversations, I struggle to get a word in between and my mind has trouble finding a pause to jump in. When I perceive there is a pause, I jump in too late and end up cutting into someone else talking.


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HighLlama
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08 Jul 2019, 4:56 am

They can be pretty tiring for reasons people said. I switch off after a while, too. If I try to speak actively and mimic their expressiveness, my face falls asleep after about 20 minutes. And talking with two people is awful. They go back and forth rapidly, while I end up standing there, never hearing the breaks in their speech that they seem to pick up on so easily.


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08 Jul 2019, 6:41 pm

If they drag on or I am very uninterested in the topic of discussion, then yes conversations can get tiring for me. Most of the time this is not the case for me though, and sometimes conversation can be very enjoyable for me.


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MagicMeerkat
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08 Jul 2019, 6:46 pm

If they are not about my special interests, pretty much always.


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Mona Pereth
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08 Jul 2019, 11:34 pm

Rocket123 wrote:
For me, I find "non-structured" conversations very tiring. I always have a difficult time thinking of something to talk about. I don’t mind speaking to someone who has knowledge/information that interests me. Typically, this "conversation" becomes more like an "interview" – where I just ask questions and listen to the other person answer. Then, I ask another question. I could ask someone questions about a single topic for hours on end (until they get bored answering my questions and figure out a polite way to "move on"). This "interview" mode seems to only work when I converse with one other individual. It doesn’t work when multiple people are involved.

In addition, I do not find most conversations at work tiring. As those typically have a purpose, where I need to exchange information with others. Those discussions are typically stimulating (at least for me). As I oftentimes gain new information/insights.


I'm very similar. I have extreme difficulty with unstructured, unfocused conversation in a group of people. I need something to focus on, either a person or a topic. Thus I can do chit chat with one person at a time, or I can do focused, structured, goal-oriented and/or topic-oriented conversation with either one or more people, but it's very hard for me to do chit chat with more than one person at a time.


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09 Jul 2019, 4:28 pm

I've learned to pretty much avoid environments which too often gravitate towards this he said, she said, they said, "who said?" conversational behaviors (one of the worst examples).

Most of the time, I politely observe e.g., listen to conversations in which I sometimes feel lost after awhile.



hurley4456
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10 Jul 2019, 12:21 pm

Sometimes, you must adapt if the situation permits...As stated by Seneca, "It's not because things are difficult we dare not venture, its because we do not venture that things are difficult." Clearly, the duration of reclusiveness is proportional to the degree of decay in respect to some skillset. Neurotypicals may not delve into deep duscuzsions readily, and instead prefer to engage in "small talk" whereas the reversal holds true for many on the spectrum. What if a comprimise is made to promote a more balanced exchange....Extremes are always inherently negative...Yes, someone on the spectrum would derive more satisfaction over time if expressing a special interest. We all tend to gravitate towards strengths and interests to feed our voids. But deep down, there exists an empty void within us that is unlocked by overcoming some obstacle. This helps facilitate balance in terms of our identity, which translates to our path in life.



HighLlama
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10 Jul 2019, 6:28 pm

hurley4456 wrote:
Sometimes, you must adapt if the situation permits...As stated by Seneca, "It's not because things are difficult we dare not venture, its because we do not venture that things are difficult." Clearly, the duration of reclusiveness is proportional to the degree of decay in respect to some skillset. Neurotypicals may not delve into deep duscuzsions readily, and instead prefer to engage in "small talk" whereas the reversal holds true for many on the spectrum. What if a comprimise is made to promote a more balanced exchange....Extremes are always inherently negative...Yes, someone on the spectrum would derive more satisfaction over time if expressing a special interest. We all tend to gravitate towards strengths and interests to feed our voids. But deep down, there exists an empty void within us that is unlocked by overcoming some obstacle. This helps facilitate balance in terms of our identity, which translates to our path in life.


I work in a job with a good amount of interaction, and that hasn't made it less difficult. I can fake through small talk, at least to a point; but most days I'd rather die than have to look at another human face, being on hyper-alert so I make the right expression/vocal inflection.


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11 Jul 2019, 4:12 am

Conversations are generally tiring, unless its about something I have an interest in. Cats, space, science etc. But even then, only for so long. Small talk, I just go throught the routine every day. Feel like a broken record. Can't be arsed with it though. I work in an open office so I need a couple of hours of me time in the evenings... stroking my cat and being close to him is relaxing too. I probably talk to him more than people some days lol. I can literally be ready for home after being out for a short amount of time socialising, before anybody else. Keeping the mask on takes some effort.


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