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cyberdad
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14 May 2021, 1:50 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Nope. My mother is 82 and has cancer. My dad is deceased. My brother is the trustee of my Will, but he wouldn't take a caregiving role. Her father's family doesn't speak to her anymore. His parents disowned their child with Down Syndrome as well, so that speaks volumes about their mentality - or lack thereof.

It's a pity about your brother. My two siblings are also fairly distant/cold with my daughter. My nephew who lives interstate thumbs his nose at her. One time he asked me "how do you stand to listen to her". Doesn't bode well for happy families.

IsabellaLinton wrote:
I wonder if you could get your daughter back on the ADHD meds? Why did she stop?

My wife and I jointly decided to use behavioural management techniques with our daughter rather than rely on medication which (we suspect) was having side-effects including mood swings, her eyesight and giving her blood noses.

IsabellaLinton wrote:
The mean girls sound awful. I know all about them. Women can be absolutely horrible to one another in insidious ways. I don't blame her for feeling more comfortable with the guys in her class. Reassure her that it's OK to have male friends. I wouldn't have survived without them. Send her a hug from me, as well. :heart:


She's on teen talk right now talking to some girls her age in the US. She told one of the girls the happiest is when she is with her male friends at recess and lunch. Young men are surprisingly more tolerant than I remember! pleasantly surprised.



MrsPeel
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14 May 2021, 2:01 am

Aspergers is an "autism spectrum condition"



Technic1
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14 May 2021, 4:50 am

Aspergers is a separate although related to Autism.

Or vice versa.

Edit: just saw the post above me and I agree.

And although I don’t know autism and Aspergers well enough to know the difference but looking normal(ish) is the most obvious.

Intelligence has nothing to do with Aspergers or Autism because there are smart Autistics and low in Aspergers.



firemonkey
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14 May 2021, 5:41 am

Based on my gait alone there is little chance I look completely 'normal' .


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Technic1
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14 May 2021, 5:43 am

...ish



22Phoenix22
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14 May 2021, 2:52 pm

Update: I tried to reach out to my doctor/mental health specialist, but since I'm not on that site anymore, I can't send a message directly to her. I reached out to support and they said they can't give me any sort of diagnosis, from them or from her. So that went nowhere, and I don't have the diagnosis in writing. I wish I hadn't lost her direct contact information! I'll try looking for it again...



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14 May 2021, 8:59 pm

Someone might be interested in this:

https://www.med.upenn.edu/aas/about.html

"The Adult Autism Spectrum Program offers consultations on diagnosis, treatment, supports, and skill development for adults and late adolescents (age 16 and up) who have, or suspect they could have, one of the following diagnoses

American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual V (DSM-V) diagnoses:

Autism Spectrum Disorder
Social Communication Disorder

American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV-TR) diagnoses:

Autistic Disorder
Asperger’s Disorder
Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) (DSM-IV)"

This is part of the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania (a well respected University in Pennsylvania in the USA).


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Aprilviolets
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15 May 2021, 2:25 am

cyberdad wrote:
IsabellaLinton wrote:
I feel like I'm not high support either, despite the fact my report says I need "significant" and "substantial" support, etc. It's not like I have a full-time caregiver or anything. But then I realise I'm comparing myself to my own norms if that makes sense.


The Australian government has introduced a National Disability Insurance scheme (NDIS) and to be eligible for funding support you need to demonstrate that significant support is required.

Despite the fact all the diagnostic paperwork says my daughter requires "high support" and that she has "significant impairment" she has been knocked back now 3 times for any financial assistance because she is considered too high functioning and (according to them) she requires no supports.

This demonstrates two things
1. diagnostic criteria applied to small children are not valid because even the government recognises that people can overcome functional impairment (hence why they ignored her diagnosis of classic autism)
2. The criteria for who is "high functioning" appears to be highly subjective (and in this instance its very frustrating). I would have thought the person who was applying for financial assistance would know best if they need support.


the NDIS was the reason I had to be diagnosed, I don't need help with shopping or housework but having someone to go out to a Market or go to a cafe would be nice, or things like ringing places that you have to press this number and that number I get agitated over it.



cyberdad
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15 May 2021, 4:53 am

Aprilviolets wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
IsabellaLinton wrote:
I feel like I'm not high support either, despite the fact my report says I need "significant" and "substantial" support, etc. It's not like I have a full-time caregiver or anything. But then I realise I'm comparing myself to my own norms if that makes sense.


The Australian government has introduced a National Disability Insurance scheme (NDIS) and to be eligible for funding support you need to demonstrate that significant support is required.

Despite the fact all the diagnostic paperwork says my daughter requires "high support" and that she has "significant impairment" she has been knocked back now 3 times for any financial assistance because she is considered too high functioning and (according to them) she requires no supports.

This demonstrates two things
1. diagnostic criteria applied to small children are not valid because even the government recognises that people can overcome functional impairment (hence why they ignored her diagnosis of classic autism)
2. The criteria for who is "high functioning" appears to be highly subjective (and in this instance its very frustrating). I would have thought the person who was applying for financial assistance would know best if they need support.


the NDIS was the reason I had to be diagnosed, I don't need help with shopping or housework but having someone to go out to a Market or go to a cafe would be nice, or things like ringing places that you have to press this number and that number I get agitated over it.


To illustrate how farcical the funding is for the NDIS, two of the girls who bullied my daughter (including calling her the r-word) apparently are diagnosed with ADHD and their parents got $1000 NDIS funding for each of the girls to purchase an ipad (they claim they need it for school) and pay for a person to pick them up and drop at school and then keeps an eye on them until their parents return from full-time work. That's the equivalent of getting free taxi/Uber and free childcare.

Utter rort given I've seen no evidence there's anything wrong with either of these two brats yet apparently my daughter isn't eligible.



Danusaurus
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15 May 2021, 5:17 am

It's the exact same condition.. it's the "spectrum"

As of I think 2012 the DSM5 now just lables it.. ASD.. Autisim.

Some P docs just use the old lable of Aspergers.

P doc = Aspeger's.. = me , me > Autisim.

Ie: I was diagnosed with Aspergers but I just call it Autistic, ASD, Autisim.



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15 May 2021, 5:20 am

cyberdad wrote:
Aprilviolets wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
IsabellaLinton wrote:
I feel like I'm not high support either, despite the fact my report says I need "significant" and "substantial" support, etc. It's not like I have a full-time caregiver or anything. But then I realise I'm comparing myself to my own norms if that makes sense.


The Australian government has introduced a National Disability Insurance scheme (NDIS) and to be eligible for funding support you need to demonstrate that significant support is required.

Despite the fact all the diagnostic paperwork says my daughter requires "high support" and that she has "significant impairment" she has been knocked back now 3 times for any financial assistance because she is considered too high functioning and (according to them) she requires no supports.

This demonstrates two things
1. diagnostic criteria applied to small children are not valid because even the government recognises that people can overcome functional impairment (hence why they ignored her diagnosis of classic autism)
2. The criteria for who is "high functioning" appears to be highly subjective (and in this instance its very frustrating). I would have thought the person who was applying for financial assistance would know best if they need support.


the NDIS was the reason I had to be diagnosed, I don't need help with shopping or housework but having someone to go out to a Market or go to a cafe would be nice, or things like ringing places that you have to press this number and that number I get agitated over it.


To illustrate how farcical the funding is for the NDIS, two of the girls who bullied my daughter (including calling her the r-word) apparently are diagnosed with ADHD and their parents got $1000 NDIS funding for each of the girls to purchase an ipad (they claim they need it for school) and pay for a person to pick them up and drop at school and then keeps an eye on them until their parents return from full-time work. That's the equivalent of getting free taxi/Uber and free childcare.

Utter rort given I've seen no evidence there's anything wrong with either of these two brats yet apparently my daughter isn't eligible.


The NDIS is a very tricky thing! It's very freaking difficult as an adult to get support from the Autisim services.. Sucks bad.



Gander
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16 May 2021, 10:58 am

I think of myself as having Asperger's, not Autism. People with Asperger's seem a lot like me. People elsewhere on the autism spectrum do not. I think your therapist knows that Asperger's is a subset of autism. But she thinks it is more helpful to think of yourself as having Asperger's, not Autism. That works for me. While I don't know you or your therapist personally, I think she is on the right track.



22Phoenix22
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16 May 2021, 3:51 pm

To Gander: Yeah, I did think she wanted me to not associate myself with Autism, so I wouldn't have to "rely" on others or think I had something "wrong" with me. That's how she pretty much seemed to look at Autistic people, as needing support from others and being lower intelligence (which I don't agree with). So she probably doesn't want me to see myself as Autistic so I can "make it somewhere" in life. I don't know, that's all the vibes she gave off and some of the language she used. I don't share her views.



cyberdad
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16 May 2021, 4:32 pm

Gander wrote:
I think of myself as having Asperger's, not Autism. People with Asperger's seem a lot like me. People elsewhere on the autism spectrum do not. I think your therapist knows that Asperger's is a subset of autism. But she thinks it is more helpful to think of yourself as having Asperger's, not Autism. That works for me. While I don't know you or your therapist personally, I think she is on the right track.


I recall many on WP were like this pre-2013. My take is the label switch doesn't change who you are and it doesn't change how others think of you.



cyberdad
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16 May 2021, 4:33 pm

22Phoenix22 wrote:
To Gander: Yeah, I did think she wanted me to not associate myself with Autism, so I wouldn't have to "rely" on others or think I had something "wrong" with me. That's how she pretty much seemed to look at Autistic people, as needing support from others and being lower intelligence (which I don't agree with). So she probably doesn't want me to see myself as Autistic so I can "make it somewhere" in life. I don't know, that's all the vibes she gave off and some of the language she used. I don't share her views.


My family refuse to call my daughter autistic. Whenever they talk about her to friends they say she has Aspergers. I frankly don't care. She is what she is.



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16 May 2021, 4:36 pm

The ICD-11 moves Asperger under Autism. So it is not just the DSM.


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