Working class towns/cities are awful, anyone agree?

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2ukenkerl
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29 Jun 2009, 7:15 am

TitusLucretiusCarus wrote:
@2ukenkerl

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I HATE the term "working class". It makes it sound like "working class" are the only ones that work, etc... Even some "working class" DON'T really work, and I certainly do, even though I am like upper middle class.


I'm probably going over something you know, but, 'working class' is used because the people in that group must work (as in go to the factory/mine/plant etc) as against the person who owns the workplace and draws an income that far outways the value of the work they do. After that you've got a couple of gradations of income, property, types of work available (some lecturers, higher management, some executives, higher ranks of police and military etc)

It's strange that I always find those who aren't working class disavow any possibility of a class society prefering the terms 'the poor' and 'everyone else' or some such like, whereas those who are working class either state it openly or are trying their best to get out of it
(this often includes scrambling over one another).

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But YEAH, if "working class" means poorer, you are right. Poorer people are usually less able and/or less willing to keep things up. They also may be ruder, etc....

Some of the nicest areas I have seen were upper middle or lower upper class.


Who's going to put money into a working class area when you can make more somewhere else? People in working class areas rarely have enough spare money to justify gentrification, no one can make profit from cafés and bars, museums etc if at all. My city has just tried this and with the recession already about 10% of the new shops, bars and coffee bars etc have closed down (after maybe 8-12 months at most) - there's no-one to patronise them!

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BTW I was taught earlier that income/job had NOTHING to do with class! RICH people could be LOW CLASS, and POOR people could be HIGH CLASS. I have known BOTH extreemes!


You've been taught or you've known? I'd love to see this one argued. I can be rich and lower class? Sure I can be rich and a rude obnoxious charv (type of town centre hick or white trash), or poor and massively pretentious. Possibly we are dealing with two different definitions of class?


YEP, THAT was my point, TWO DIFFERENT definitions of class.

And I HAVE to work ALSO! HECK, I haven't had a vacation, or ERALLY even been home, for TWO YEARS! My LONGEST vacation, outside of one in 1989 was 2 weeks. In 1989 it was 3 weeks.

If I were at a minimum wage job, at least I would feel more free about losing it.



HowlingMad1992
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29 Jun 2009, 7:57 am

I live in a town which is classed as being a "working class" town and to be honest it isn't the best place to live. So it does have some decent things that most people need such as shops, market, etc, but it's not excetly what you would call a 'picture postcard' sort of town.



eric76
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18 Dec 2014, 12:55 am

misswoofalot wrote:
I wish there was a class based on intelligence rather than perceived wealth.


Doesn't intelligence often help move one closer to the top of one's class?



eric76
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18 Dec 2014, 12:59 am

2ukenkerl wrote:
HECK, I haven't had a vacation, or ERALLY even been home, for TWO YEARS! My LONGEST vacation, outside of one in 1989 was 2 weeks. In 1989 it was 3 weeks.


My last vacation was in August, 2001. It lasted four days and I spent my time helping someone move from one house to another.

My best vacation lasted about a week. I spent the week hanging around the old Math Department where I went to college. Talked to a lot of my profs and all the remaining grad students I still knew and attended some department seminars. It was a great vacation.



auntblabby
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18 Dec 2014, 1:08 am

social intelligence [rather like a savant-like social shtick with generous helpings of ruthless bullyboy temperament] helps to put one atop one's local heap o'humanity. in my experience, raw general intelligence comes in a distant second 99% of the time. I discovered this in the army.



FedUpAsp
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18 Dec 2014, 4:22 am

I grew up in a terrible, high crime, working class environment and I'll never go back. Now I live in a sleepy small town and love it, except that everything closes by 6pm.



Sweetleaf
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18 Dec 2014, 4:37 am

Perambulator wrote:
Today I was walking home past a bar and a group of guys were stood outside. Three of them had tied up the one of them with sticky tape and toilet paper to the lamppost. I found it amusing and they were all laughing. So I laughed as I passed in a friendly way.

Their faces all went stone cold and one of them said "He looks like a f***ing Jew." Does that kind of thing happen everywhere?


I actually do not think that would happen here...


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Sweetleaf
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18 Dec 2014, 4:42 am

auntblabby wrote:
social intelligence [rather like a savant-like social shtick with generous helpings of ruthless bullyboy temperament] helps to put one atop one's local heap o'humanity. in my experience, raw general intelligence comes in a distant second 99% of the time. I discovered this in the army.


I tend to agree, though in my case I discovered that via general observation of humans and interactions with them...as well as some things I learned in college.


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Evil_Chuck
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18 Dec 2014, 1:04 pm

The grass is always greener on the other side. A big city or a "charming" small town isn't necessarily any better for us than a working-class neighborhood. Class does make some kind of difference in that I feel more comfortable around people who resemble my low-key middle-class family. I don't like rich snobs, but I'm okay with poor people if they have some common sense and regard for other human beings. I've always been poor myself, after all.


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mc2004
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18 Dec 2014, 3:21 pm

Just personal preference, but my experience and preference is opposite the OP's. I grew up in a working class agricultural town, and in my post-high school years spent time living in a little college town in the mountains of Idaho, in an area dotted by little working class logging towns. The kind of towns where the phrase "They're shutting down the mill" strikes utter dread into the hearts of everyone in the town, and in some cases causes the town to dry up altogether.

Today I live in the middle of the largest, most affluent, and most densely populated and most culturally and economically diverse area in the nation - Southern California. Home is a nice little family town on the edge of Orange County, work is in the belly of the beast in Los Angeles. There are things I do like about it, but for the purposes of topics being discussed here, I hate it. It is absolute hell on my ASD. The constant stimulation, crowds, and complete inability to be alone anywhere puts me on sensory overload 100% of the time. Having to constantly manage interfacing with multiple diverse ethnicities and cultures does as well, possibly even moreso. I'm constantly stimmed out here, even in the relatively quiet areas.

In the working class towns back home, there is 1) a lot less to manage socially, as you typically do have one "type" to interact with so the social rules are easier, and 2) wayyy more opportunity to get out alone and away from the sensory overload. I was much much more at peace in those areas than I ever am here.


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Dillogic
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18 Dec 2014, 4:02 pm

It's no better in the upper and lower classes for the socially disabled.

Though I prefer the working class mindset, as they tend to be less controlling.


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eric76
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18 Dec 2014, 8:17 pm

Evil_Chuck wrote:
The grass is always greener on the other side.
Not always.

In this case, the grass is greener on my side. Much, much greener.

It's is very nice to be relatively content.



Bushmaster
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01 Aug 2016, 4:13 pm

it depends on the location of the town and the people who inhabit it.


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01 Aug 2016, 4:17 pm

Yes, the rust belt and anywhere that has been left to decline for 40+ years are almost all universally pretty awful places. Is anywhere good? I dunno, probably if you have money but being poor in these cities is worst than anything. Gotta go where the growth and the money is while still being somewhat affordable.



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01 Aug 2016, 4:51 pm

ARW_AS wrote:
Ooh - contentious! I love talking about class (it's one of my obsessions!): I come from a fairly affluent garden suburb; bland, boring and no character. At least these areas you come from have some charm about them.


I am also quite fascinated by class. I think it is putting people into boxes that interests me.

I am from Reading which I see as historically very working class but now benefits from being in the centre of the UK's 'silicon valley'. I.T companies everywhere and a 30 minutes train ride from London so working class no more. My dad was a factory worker from the age of 14 with a very rough and dubious past and my mum a local supermarket worker so my upbringing was very much in line with working class but as a grown up myself and my siblings are very much living the middle class life as the location and employment opportunities offer that. Feels weird 'betraying' your class.