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zeldapsychology
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09 May 2010, 8:54 am

I was printing a pic. off the computer for a frame and mom said she'd help me later. I decided to take it upon myself and just do it myself I printed it and it jammed into the frame so now I have to print another pic. Mom says I go at everything so fast but IMO when I want something done I'm a RIGHT NOW type of person so I don't forget it needs to be done. :-( Now I've wasted ink and upset mom (so like the past I ran into my room in tears!) (Not to mention it doesn't help I didn't fall asleep till 3AM I think I tend to be emotional when I don't get enough sleep.) :-(



CockneyRebel
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09 May 2010, 9:08 am

I have only one speed, when I go at what I want, and that's fast. After I finally got my printer working with my net book, I've decided to buy some ink cartridges, for my printer. I've decided to print some pictures to tape up, in my sleeping area. I sat down and started printing. Before I knew it, I've used 30 sheets of paper and I had to buy more cartridges for my printer.


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LipstickKiller
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09 May 2010, 1:55 pm

I do. Once I want to do something I want it straight away. In the past I'd just try and push it through if other people were required, but that caused conflict. I have a one track-mind. If I can't do what I want I spend time planning how to go about it instead. It's really hard to say "I'll do it later". So a few days ago I decided I was gonna get rid of the wall-to-wall carpet in the bedroom. I couldn't move the furniture myself, but I didn't want to wait for help so I just did it around the furniture with some tricks. There's still carpet under the closet though. I also didn't eat and didn't do any homework and really had to pull myself together to pick up the kids from daycare. It's like I'm possessed by my own mind when I get those ideas. I worked on the damn carpet for seven hours straight. I don't care for the trouble of getting help since people are so slow to say yes and even slower to actually help. And there's also the part where they think I'm a b*tch for not caring that they have other things to do.

Wow, I guess I really am inflexible once I get something on my mind. :!: me=bulldozer



Asterisp
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09 May 2010, 2:09 pm

I learned myself to suppress those kinds of urges. Now the consequence is I start delaying things or forgetting things, especially tasks that I do not like. Finding a good balance is difficult.



LipstickKiller
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09 May 2010, 2:28 pm

@ Asterisp It is. It seems as though if I don't get it done when I get the urge, it just never gets done, so if it's anything like a chore I try to do it right away.



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09 May 2010, 5:00 pm

Used to. I think doing things at a more moderate pace is more efficient, as I spend less time compensating for mistakes made while rushing to get things done.


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09 May 2010, 5:48 pm

It depends. If it's something like schoolwork that i don't particularly want to do, i'm a HUGE procrastinator. If it's something i want to do or am excited about, then i want to do it right then and find waiting very difficult.



JetLag
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09 May 2010, 7:39 pm

Yes, whether it's working, playing, or even eating, I tend to do everything in a rush. Even after talking myself into finally doing a few of my least favorite chores about the house, I'll have them finished as soon as I can make it happen.


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auntblabby
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10 May 2010, 1:19 am

my rush mode started in army basic training when they made you do everything at a hundred miles an hour. no walking allowed, nor standing around, you have to MOVEMOVEMOVE!! ! even in the mess hall [chow] you had to eat everything on your tray in less than a minute or you were given the bum's rush out of the mess hall, still hungry. so i had to learn to wolf my food down. this affects me to this day, as all that food forced down my gullet gave me GERD/hiatal hernia. ever since, i walked too fast everywhere i went, to comical effect. it made me very impatient with the slow pace of everybody else, especially when driving, i would always have my foot to the floor everywhere i went.
it is only with age that i have slowed down, due to increasing decrepitude of my physicality and mentality. but i still tend to wolf down my food, so i have to remind myself [if my GERD doesn't flare up] to take it easy.



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10 May 2010, 12:16 pm

I'm the same way. I have to get everything done immediately; any non-optimized time is time wasted.
Like some posters above have said, this can have tendency to result in errors. I've countered that by learning to be completely methodical in my first attempt.
In my career (computer software/mathematics) this has helped me tremendously. I've consistently been more productive than two other average workers and can always be counted on to get the job done on time.

I suggest you use this to your advantage. Force yourself to be more systematic in your problem solving skills; take more time preparing for a task. Then complete it as fast as you can. Follow it up with a double-check and postmortem review to see how you can improve your performance next time. I do this from everything such as shaving, changing garbage bags, and socialization as well as job functions. You don't need to be as systematized as I am, but perhaps a little bit of organization can help.
Bonus: if you demonstrate this type of thoroughness while your boss is watching, you will get good reviews.


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Todesking
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14 May 2010, 2:01 am

I eat very fast does this count? when I was in basic training for the army, when your squad leader was done eating you were done eating. I was a squad leader I was always done eating before the privates in my squad. My drill sargeants would explain to me that I was starving my squad mates but I just could not get it through my head to slow down so the drill sargeants would ask me if I wanted seconds so my squad mates could get a chance to eat. They told me they wish they had an entire platoon of soldiers just like me to train that was always in a rush to get things done and were obssessed with trying to get things done right.

They would yell at me for running down stairs and metal bleachers. I was also too fast with the floor buffer, I knocked bunks and privates all over the place. LoL I sometimes wish I would have stayed with the army after all the bad experiences I had with the civilian job market. As for my last job I was obssessed with screwing these stems into these yoke bodies as fast as I could with a drill. If you went down too far the drill would get ripped out of my hands and I would be lifted off the ground. It actually was pretty fun trying to do it faster each time without getting hurt I always looked foward to this job when I saw it listed on my things to do board.



Last edited by Todesking on 14 May 2010, 4:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

KevinLA
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14 May 2010, 2:23 am

It's called anxiety.



zeldapsychology
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14 May 2010, 6:20 am

KevinLA wrote:
It's called anxiety.



How is going at everything so fast anxiety? I always associated it with excessive worrying/fear/nervousness (I've considered if I have anxiety issues but since it'd be "Oh here's an anxiety medication" I choose NOT to bring it up with the psychiatrist I'm on ENOUGH PILLS as it is SHEESH! LOL!) :-)



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14 May 2010, 6:39 am

Must confess that although I collapse if anybody tries to get me to rush, I spend a lot of my time in a self-driven frenzy of hyperactivity. I don't think it's caused by anxiety, I think it's caused by a morbid notion that time is short. Possibly the result of too many greedy bosses and being surrounded by workaholics. A common management trick in my workplace is to get people feeling that their job is to complete a particular mission by the end of the day (many of our processes can't be mothballed overnight because we deal with biological materials that don't last in the fridge), then they increase the workload and cut back on support, leaving the worker to discover that they're not going to be able to leave at the normal allotted hour. Unexpected overtime upsets me, not just because it flies in the face of my Aspie rigid thinking and need for a predictable routine, but also because it's a bastard trick to play on the workforce. So I rush to get finished in time, and after a while it gets to be a habit, and I can't stop rushing when I get home.



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14 May 2010, 6:52 pm

zeldapsychology wrote:
How is going at everything so fast anxiety?


I can get geared up anxiety-wise about something that needs to be done and start going 100 miles an hour handling it, and often keep going for other tasks as well until I wind down. It's like being in an altered mental state; I don't really feel like I'm going fast, but hours fly by and a mountain of stuff gets done. Also, I can exhibit unusual physical strength from all the adrenaline; I can throw things around that I can't budge normally.


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rainbowbutterfly
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14 May 2010, 11:24 pm

I am the exact opposite way. Except for my fast paced thinking and good reflexes, I do ALMOST EVERYTHING in slow motion. It's not because I intend it to be that way; it's because the neurons in my brain fire at an extra slow rate. I always notice that most people get done with the same tasks much faster than me, and some people that don't know me well mistake me for being MR because of it. I'm learning delayed, I write slowly, I take a while to comprehend what people are saying, I move slowly, and I even talk slowly.
Before taking speech therapy I used to drag out every syllable in every word that I said. (I wasn't even aware I was doing that until my classmates started making fun of me.) In college, I had extended time on my examinations, and would take 3 - 6 hours to write either a one page single - spaced, or 2 page double spaced essay in standard sized font. I didn't even learn the difference between horizontal, vertical, diagonal, left and right until 6th grade.
All of this makes me nervous about how I'll do in the workforce, but I'm now glad that I've been considered qualified for a job coach, along with the Work Opportunity Tax Credit.