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dragonzmyst
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11 May 2010, 5:53 pm

cyberscan ~ awesome program! Thanks so much for sharing it. :D

Everyone ~ thanks for your input. I think I'm going to go ahead with it once I get the $$ saved up. I appreciate all of your responses!



cyberscan
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11 May 2010, 8:23 pm

dragonzmyst wrote:
cyberscan ~ awesome program! Thanks so much for sharing it. :D

Everyone ~ thanks for your input. I think I'm going to go ahead with it once I get the $$ saved up. I appreciate all of your responses!


I'm glad you like it. You can also make a medical alert bracelet with paper and cellophane tape. Mine is a band of cloth (I don't wear jewelry) with the medical alert symbol, my name, address, and list of conditions that were put on via an iron on transfer paper.


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LabPet
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11 May 2010, 10:31 pm

http://www.americanmedical-id.com/

IMO, yes. Remember that a medic alert is (or should be) discrete; no one knows what's on your medic alert id bracelet/tag but it exists for those who may need to assist you if that becomes necessary.

To confide (one example here): I had a horrific meltdown once whilst driving north (note I live in Alaska) and become lost/disoriented. I started crying uncontrollably, then screaming. The white snow was swirling and completely dark outside in a VERY remote locale. I did pull-over (of course) and had curled-up on my car seat with the ignition running (and heater on high) - for 4 hours. The temperature outside was - 50 degrees F (bitter cold) and I was alone with no cell phone.

Very fortunate in that a motorist (total stranger) pulled-over to check if all was OK since he saw my car parked alongside the road. By then, I was (mostly) OK but very sleepy from post-meltdown yet still slightly agitated. I almost could not speak. This extremely kind motorist immediately knew this was a medical emergency (not some drunk driver, etc)! He called 911 asap and the medics were really nice - I was taken back to town and OK. But those medics firstly checked my medical alert id bracelet - SO thankful I had that identification else they would have had virtually no clue what was wrong with me.

Later, the medic said that bracelet may have saved my life and certainly made it much easier for them as they honestly did not know - they had thought I may have had a seizure, serious psychiatric disorder, drug reaction, even insulin shock, etc. I recovered very quickly but I could have frozen to death or been raped, etc.

So, yes, medic alerts serve a purpose. Although I mostly do really well my AS/Autism can be noticable to others. In a medical situation time is critical and vital they know (and not guess)! For many, a medical card is a great idea! And a medical card can supplement your medic id bracelet or necklace (whichever you prefer).

The link I gave above is great and you may order directly from the site - you'll not your doctor/provider to order for you (but good idea to show him/her if you'd like). Especially if you have "other conditions" such as allergies, etc.

I must say, some of these bracelets (including mine) are pretty (or handsome, if you're male :D ) and can look like a fashionable stainless bracelet. Check out their selection - good prices and they have some fancy selections such as titanium! Also, be sure to save your receipt! Your medical insurance may cover part of the expensve, depending. And it's tax deductible otherwise. Get one you like, but remember they serve a real purpose, should you ever need.

*** Also, there are Autism/AS cards (pre-printed and laminated) available online, if you wish! Another choice - make your own, clip it out, and laminate with clear tape for your wallet. You may Google "autism awareness hand-out cards" or related to see their options (I find those too simplistic (?) for Aspies, but it's a start. Cards ought to be small and concise for your wallet. ***



LabPet
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11 May 2010, 10:43 pm

http://www.autismgear.com/OtherItems.html

^ Autism awareness hand-out cards (and you could certainly print your own) *may* be a good idea for some - modified for your own needs.

cyberscan gave a GREAT link for a medical card! Autism/AS cards can be handy if and only if a stranger (or ignorant person) truly does not know and is (?) curious. Discretion is best though.

Locally, I once saw a little boy (maybe 7ish?) who was having a HORRIFIC meltdown (yes, I do know. I'm meltdown prone enough that I know). His mother (? I assume mother) was wonderful and did "everything right" by gently taking hold of him and wrapped her coat around him tightly. Poor kid - he was frantic and had been screaming, literally choking in his tears, and spinning in circles. Middle of the grocery store in the canned food aisle. BUT, I did notice that some (not all!) of the other shoppers gave disparaging comments, clearly NOT understanding the situation. In this situation, an Autism Awareness card hand-out would have certainly been appropriate. Felt so badly for that boy........when his mother was finally able to carry him out of that store he was exhausted and almost limp. I so much wish others had helped her - I was some distance away from them but she did well. Some strangers can be cruel from not knowing. The boy was in medical distress.



Followthereaper90
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12 May 2010, 5:13 am

LabPet wrote:
http://www.americanmedical-id.com/

IMO, yes. Remember that a medic alert is (or should be) discrete; no one knows what's on your medic alert id bracelet/tag but it exists for those who may need to assist you if that becomes necessary.

To confide (one example here): I had a horrific meltdown once whilst driving north (note I live in Alaska) and become lost/disoriented. I started crying uncontrollably, then screaming. The white snow was swirling and completely dark outside in a VERY remote locale. I did pull-over (of course) and had curled-up on my car seat with the ignition running (and heater on high) - for 4 hours. The temperature outside was - 50 degrees F (bitter cold) and I was alone with no cell phone.

Very fortunate in that a motorist (total stranger) pulled-over to check if all was OK since he saw my car parked alongside the road. By then, I was (mostly) OK but very sleepy from post-meltdown yet still slightly agitated. I almost could not speak. This extremely kind motorist immediately knew this was a medical emergency (not some drunk driver, etc)! He called 911 asap and the medics were really nice - I was taken back to town and OK. But those medics firstly checked my medical alert id bracelet - SO thankful I had that identification else they would have had virtually no clue what was wrong with me.

Later, the medic said that bracelet may have saved my life and certainly made it much easier for them as they honestly did not know - they had thought I may have had a seizure, serious psychiatric disorder, drug reaction, even insulin shock, etc. I recovered very quickly but I could have frozen to death or been raped, etc.

So, yes, medic alerts serve a purpose. Although I mostly do really well my AS/Autism can be noticable to others. In a medical situation time is critical and vital they know (and not guess)! For many, a medical card is a great idea! And a medical card can supplement your medic id bracelet or necklace (whichever you prefer).

The link I gave above is great and you may order directly from the site - you'll not your doctor/provider to order for you (but good idea to show him/her if you'd like). Especially if you have "other conditions" such as allergies, etc.

I must say, some of these bracelets (including mine) are pretty (or handsome, if you're male :D ) and can look like a fashionable stainless bracelet. Check out their selection - good prices and they have some fancy selections such as titanium! Also, be sure to save your receipt! Your medical insurance may cover part of the expensve, depending. And it's tax deductible otherwise. Get one you like, but remember they serve a real purpose, should you ever need.

*** Also, there are Autism/AS cards (pre-printed and laminated) available online, if you wish! Another choice - make your own, clip it out, and laminate with clear tape for your wallet. You may Google "autism awareness hand-out cards" or related to see their options (I find those too simplistic (?) for Aspies, but it's a start. Cards ought to be small and concise for your wallet. ***
sorry for your meltdown :( anyway as car mechanic i just have to comment that u should never leave car on inginition for more then 30mins..if battery drains out u are in trouble more important when its cold outside, in car temperature rarely goes below -5


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dragonzmyst
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12 May 2010, 7:00 am

Labpet ~ I'm sorry for your experience! (((hugs))) Thanks so much for sharing it with us. It really helped me see just how important a bracelet is. I'm going to be ordering it as soon as I can.


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astaut
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12 May 2010, 9:44 am

I think it depends on the individual as to if they need a medic bracelet. I can't think of a reason why I would...I haven't even told all my doctors about AS for that matter. I do wear a medic alert for some other medical conditions, though.



FredOak3
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14 May 2010, 10:10 am

Here is the one I use when I ride my bike...

RoadID.com



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14 May 2010, 7:16 pm

I don't think everyone on the autism spectrum needs a bracelet. If you're capable of saying "I have Asperger's Syndrome" or "I have autism" or whatever, then you probably don't. If you're partially nonverbal, it's probably a good idea.



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16 May 2010, 10:10 am

thank you OP, this is a wonderful idea i hadnt thought of. i have a 4 yr old aspie and while we are pretty watchful of him when we are out, there have been occassions where hes wandered away. he is unafraid to be alone without us and is always following whatever shiny thing catches his eye. at least with a medic id, people would be able to contact us if he is missing for a length of time.



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16 May 2010, 10:18 am

I've had to alert the DVLA in my country, not about aspergers though. Bipolar, the doctor doesn't think I should drive yet.



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16 May 2010, 12:40 pm

OP - that's very cool. The list of medications is a great idea.

FredOak3 wrote:
Here is the one I use when I ride my bike...

RoadID.com


FredOak - this is really cool, too.



0hawkeye0
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18 May 2010, 3:09 pm

I carry a card in my wallet with emergency contact information, a list of my medications, and my major issues (lol). It briefly describes some of my unusual behaviors and how to deal with them. I want a bracelet or something though, because no one would know it was there until they looked for ID (it sits in front of my driver's license). ASD, Tourette's, migraines, asthma, hypersensitivity, nonverbal under stress. Having something more visible, just so they know to look for the card, would probably be a good idea.



Mattdudley
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08 Sep 2010, 2:40 am

Hello all,
Ever wondered what will happen if your elder parents are alone at home and there have been serious health disorder , this problem can be solved if an alert alarm system is being implanted. that can really help a lot in the cause.



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08 Sep 2010, 3:47 am

I have had some very bad experiences in hospital, especially being touched, as well as misunderstandings with interviews. One statement that I made was incorrectly (without my prior knowledge, and quite improperly) reported to admin as an allegation that a doctor had sexually assaulted me.

To avoid similar embarrassment again I carry one of these (several languages available): http://www.autism.org.uk/our-services/s ... -card.aspx



Niamh
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01 Apr 2011, 4:01 pm

I have a Medicalert because I have a life-threatening allergy to a particular type of antibiotic, and when I was ordering the tag and wallet card my boyfriend insisted I add Asperger's to it. I think he was right, may as well just add it in case it turns out useful one day. It doesn't cost any more to have both conditions written on it!