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Alycat
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25 Jun 2010, 4:32 pm

I volunteer at a children's club, and my boss knows about my AS. Today she said that one of the girls in our Sunday School (she didn't want to name them unless they said it was okay for her to do so) is going through the process of AS diagnosis, and she'd like to let the girl know about MY diagnosis because she thinks it would help.
I've said it would be okay, and I'm wondering if this girl will expect me to help her in some way. I've no idea which of our kids she is, or how old she is (I work with two and a half to eighteen year olds, so quite a spread).
Do any of you guys know what I should do?


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LostAlien
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25 Jun 2010, 4:59 pm

She may want to talk to you or ask advice from you or she may do nothing. Sometimes knowing that you're not alone can really help.



clovismackintosh
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25 Jun 2010, 5:06 pm

It it were me, I'd say 'yes'. That's because I not met any one else with AS and I'd see discussing the condition as being mutually beneficial.

Clearly, it's simplistic to say that 2 AS people will necessarily have anything much in common, but the potential to learn here is quite an intensive.


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25 Jun 2010, 9:10 pm

Chances are you'll be able to offer SOME advice, but there's only so much you can do anyway. The fact that someone like her is employed in such a position alone could be a comfort.


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buryuntime
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25 Jun 2010, 9:47 pm

be her friend.



Moog
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26 Jun 2010, 5:18 am

Yeah go for it Alycat. If you can help her out that's cool, and if you can't, no big deal. You might make a good friend. She could even have some advice for you. :)


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Kiseki
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26 Jun 2010, 5:27 am

I would love to be able to do this for a child. You probably don't know completely the impact this could have on her.

I teach an autistic child now. He is probably mid-range and I'm not even sure if I have AS or not. But I wish I could tell his mother how many AS characteristics I have myself. I'd like to try and help him more.



Ferdinand
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26 Jun 2010, 6:08 am

buryuntime wrote:
be her friend.



Alycat
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26 Jun 2010, 2:47 pm

Thanks for the advice guys.

I already work one on one with a little boy diagnosed with Autism, but he is quite young and a lot lower on the spectrum, so I'm not telling him (or his parents).

Depending on who this girl is and what she's like, I guess I'll just try to work out what to do as things happen.

I am now going through the lists of kids in my head trying to work out who it is - very nosy I know!


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