does Broader Autism Phenotype fall under PDD-NOS?

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FranzOren
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21 Jul 2020, 11:47 pm

That does not mean that you will no longer have mental health issues and developmental disorders



You will be just be accepted by society



FranzOren
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21 Jul 2020, 11:48 pm

League_Girl wrote:
I don't think so. BAP just means someone has autistic traits but not enough to be on the spectrum. Heck I wonder if its even possible to have lot of traits and still not be on it because you are missing one thing you need to be on it. I am sure it is since one of my online friends told me her dad has lot of them but he is lacking the lack of social skills. That would sure not make you be on it.

Or just imagine a whole family, cousins, aunts and uncles, and they all have traits but put them all together, they fall onto the autism spectrum but each of them isn't on it. That would depend on what characteristics they have.




It's just wrong, as I explained before



FranzOren
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21 Jul 2020, 11:51 pm

League_Girl wrote:
I don't think so. BAP just means someone has autistic traits but not enough to be on the spectrum. Heck I wonder if its even possible to have lot of traits and still not be on it because you are missing one thing you need to be on it. I am sure it is since one of my online friends told me her dad has lot of them but he is lacking the lack of social skills. That would sure not make you be on it.

Or just imagine a whole family, cousins, aunts and uncles, and they all have traits but put them all together, they fall onto the autism spectrum but each of them isn't on it. That would depend on what characteristics they have.




Just because all disorders will be accepted by society, does not mean that the disorders wont exist



Jiheisho
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21 Jul 2020, 11:53 pm

FranzOren wrote:
If it is just a personality trait, can personality disorders also be a form of developmental disorders?


Can Autism Personality Disorder exist ( a form of Autism that is more mild than Asperger's Syndrome ), so that even more will be considered to be on the Autism Spectrum ?


Personality disorders and developmental disorders are separate categories because they are not the same thing. Certainly, personality disorders can be comorbid with autism, but don't define it. While the criteria for autism have been refined, there is still a narrow set of criteria. But mixing comorbid conditions with autism simply serve no purpose. Besides, a doctor can get more money to treat both a developmental and personality disorder at the same time. :)

Broader Autism Phenotype is not something you can be diagnosed with as a condition or a disorder. It is simply a descriptor to investigate what lies outside the autism spectrum, but not inside it.



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 12:04 am

Janissy wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
IOr just imagine a whole family, cousins, aunts and uncles, and they all have traits but put them all together, they fall onto the autism spectrum but each of them isn't on it. That would depend on what characteristics they have.


That's my husband's family. And my family. They got "put all together" when we had a child and that is probably why she is autistic. Although she is a unique individual, I can see bits and pieces of each trait in different members of both families including myself.




My psychiatrist explained to me that since Autism is a spectrum, it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with social skills from early childhood to adulthood and not all with Autism need to fit the DSM version of Autism


But usually most with Autism have problems with social skills



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22 Jul 2020, 2:03 am

FranzOren wrote:
If it is just a personality trait, can personality disorders also be a form of developmental disorders?

I don't see the connection between your question and the idea that BAP is a personality trait.

BAP cannot be a single personality trait because it's modeled on autism, which is defined by multiple traits (social/communication issues, repetitive/restricted behavior, and atypical sensory processing). I think the above poster called BAP a "personality trait" only to imply that BAP is not as serious as autism, which is considered to be a disorder.

Personality disorders can't be developmental disorders because developmental disorders are defined as being present very early in life, in infancy (some doctors probably think or have evidence that some of them are present even earlier, at birth or in utero). Developing a personality disorder requires a person to mature enough to develop a personality, so neither the personality nor the disorder fit the criterion of being present in early life. In contemporary psychological theory, personalities are not considered to be developed so early as infancy.



kraftiekortie
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22 Jul 2020, 6:32 am

Broader Autism Phenotype, to me, would cover both people with diagnosable autism and people with autistic traits without diagnosable impairment.

There is a tendency for both diagnosable autism and autistic traits accompanied by lack of impairment to be inheritable in a “broadened”, non-Mendelian sense.

It is a “broader” view of the “autism spectrum.”



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 11:26 am

starkid wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
If it is just a personality trait, can personality disorders also be a form of developmental disorders?

I don't see the connection between your question and the idea that BAP is a personality trait.

BAP cannot be a single personality trait because it's modeled on autism, which is defined by multiple traits (social/communication issues, repetitive/restricted behavior, and atypical sensory processing). I think the above poster called BAP a "personality trait" only to imply that BAP is not as serious as autism, which is considered to be a disorder.

Personality disorders can't be developmental disorders because developmental disorders are defined as being present very early in life, in infancy (some doctors probably think or have evidence that some of them are present even earlier, at birth or in utero). Developing a personality disorder requires a person to mature enough to develop a personality, so neither the personality nor the disorder fit the criterion of being present in early life. In contemporary psychological theory, personalities are not considered to be developed so early as infancy.



Personality Disorders could happen in early childhood as well



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 11:28 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Broader Autism Phenotype, to me, would cover both people with diagnosable autism and people with autistic traits without diagnosable impairment.

There is a tendency for both diagnosable autism and autistic traits accompanied by lack of impairment to be inheritable in a “broadened”, non-Mendelian sense.

It is a “broader” view of the “autism spectrum.”



This is the problem with the spectrum, its also includes other disorders ( forms of Autism that is milder than Asperger's Syndrome ) or BAP



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 11:29 am

starkid wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
If it is just a personality trait, can personality disorders also be a form of developmental disorders?

I don't see the connection between your question and the idea that BAP is a personality trait.

BAP cannot be a single personality trait because it's modeled on autism, which is defined by multiple traits (social/communication issues, repetitive/restricted behavior, and atypical sensory processing). I think the above poster called BAP a "personality trait" only to imply that BAP is not as serious as autism, which is considered to be a disorder.

Personality disorders can't be developmental disorders because developmental disorders are defined as being present very early in life, in infancy (some doctors probably think or have evidence that some of them are present even earlier, at birth or in utero). Developing a personality disorder requires a person to mature enough to develop a personality, so neither the personality nor the disorder fit the criterion of being present in early life. In contemporary psychological theory, personalities are not considered to be developed so early as infancy.






My psychiatrist explained to me that since Autism is a spectrum, it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with social skills from early childhood to adulthood and not all with Autism need to fit the DSM version of Autism or any criteria


But usually most with Autism have problems with social skills



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 11:31 am

I have better social skills than most Autistics, even though I have some form of Autism



starkid
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22 Jul 2020, 2:18 pm

FranzOren wrote:
My psychiatrist explained to me that since Autism is a spectrum, it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with social skills from early childhood to adulthood and not all with Autism need to fit the DSM version of Autism or any criteria

Well everyone has some social skills, but if your psychiatrist thinks there can be such a thing as an autistic person who has no atypical social behavior, she is wrong. Social problems are part of the definition of autism. The autism spectrum is not so broad that it includes things that are not autism.



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 5:28 pm

starkid wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
My psychiatrist explained to me that since Autism is a spectrum, it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with social skills from early childhood to adulthood and not all with Autism need to fit the DSM version of Autism or any criteria

Well everyone has some social skills, but if your psychiatrist thinks there can be such a thing as an autistic person who has no atypical social behavior, she is wrong. Social problems are part of the definition of autism. The autism spectrum is not so broad that it includes things that are not autism.




I have better social skills than most Autistics, even though I have some form of Autism



FranzOren
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22 Jul 2020, 5:36 pm

starkid wrote:
FranzOren wrote:
My psychiatrist explained to me that since Autism is a spectrum, it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with social skills from early childhood to adulthood and not all with Autism need to fit the DSM version of Autism or any criteria

Well everyone has some social skills, but if your psychiatrist thinks there can be such a thing as an autistic person who has no atypical social behavior, she is wrong. Social problems are part of the definition of autism. The autism spectrum is not so broad that it includes things that are not autism.



My psychiatrist explained to me that since Autism is a spectrum, it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with neurotypical social skills from early childhood to adulthood and not all with Autism need to fit the criteria version of Autism


it is possible to have some rare from Pervasive Developmental Disorder with neurotypical social skills from early childhood to adulthood


You just won't have interests that society considers normal and it caused you great distress from early to late childhood



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22 Jul 2020, 5:50 pm

NullChamber wrote:
http://www.brighthub.com/mental-health/autism-pdd/articles/63010.aspx

this link says it does. i was kind of surprised.. is this accurate? i'm confused now.


Broader Autism Phenotype is not and never was a diagnosis. PDD-NOS was a diagnosis in the DSM-IV and is now part of Autism Spectrum Disorder.



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22 Jul 2020, 7:13 pm

my youngest brother has PDD-nos diagnosis and he has everything that they said for me demonstrated autism (in my case)
yet for him they labeled it pdd nos- he is less adept than me (although i was just as hapless as him before)
in many ways.. after having kids it seems my abilities sky-rocketed compared to before..., though it doesn't last throughout the day, it's a million times better than i was prior (i think when u give birth and take care of kids your brain must do something and develop more so u can handle it)

and can even be classed as level 2 though he appears to be super capable and super intelligent (and witty).. he fits those things most.. even though i don't want to say it to him.. he consistently shows LEVEL 2 need of assistance and without it accomplishes nothing ..even just getting himself a drink or going to bathroom takes him so much difficulty and effort in planning and anxiety..

it's really obvious if you meet him.. but he (and my parents) think otherwise..
my parents are so good at not realizing anything though

while he is intelligent, the 'capability' is an act/show that never results in action because it's only to pacify people and a defense mechanism .. and he is unable ..
if someone met him they would know what i mean.. he cannot do anything.. but compared to me he can talk to people in a coordinated wway.. but it's very odd because his word/reading/writing skills are wayyyy higher than anything else (just like me) ..
so i guess they classed that as PDD-NOS???


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