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MarkMartino
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02 Mar 2011, 11:17 pm

Verdandi wrote:
I forgot to mention my visual snow/pixellation/whatever that intensifies with overstimulation.

It doesn't really impair my vision so far, but it's definitely visible and occasionally a distraction.


It's always seemed to me like mine was excessive "system noise", nerve or brain static. Yeah.

You know, it's really nice not to be the odd one for a change in my life. That's what knowing about AS and being around here has done for me—I'm much more comfortable with myself. I wish it hadn't taken until my 54th birthday, but better now than never.


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AspieDa
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03 Mar 2011, 12:54 am

I too have a sensitivity to sunlight I don't really like artificial light either. The Sun makes me sneeze and my eyes water without sunglasses I wouldn't be able to function outside. Florescent light is horrible.


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03 Mar 2011, 1:17 am

If I am in a dark room in the daytime and the windows have half open blinds the light coming through the blinds will make me dizzy and sick. Teachers use to get pissed everytime we watches a film on the projector or a film strip they had to leave the blinds down or open. When I was in the ICU for my congestive heart failure I drove the nurses nuts telling them to keep the blinds close or open and never half open. Strobe lights make me dizzy and nauseas as well. I also have problems with direction sense. I found this out when I was in a rollar skating rink when I was a kid when they turned off the regular lights then replaced with strobe lights without warning. Luckily my friend's mom saw I was having a problem with the lights so she had to escort me to the wall. 8O The flashing lights on police cars or ambulances hurt the back of my eyes as they whip pass. My friends use to laugh when I put my head down in an attempt not to see them go by. Cars high beams at night if the cars go in rapid sucession just about drives me insane.


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11 Mar 2011, 7:09 pm

I have a question. I know that I'm sensitive to light, but would itchy eyes also be a part of that? I have always thought the itchiness was due to some kind of allergy, but I've noticed that when I have my sunglasses on while at the computer, the itchiness goes away. The thing is, I don't know if it's possible for light to cause itchiness. That seems odd. Is it because of the light, or just a weird coincidence?



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11 Mar 2011, 7:15 pm

Zen wrote:
I have a question. I know that I'm sensitive to light, but would itchy eyes also be a part of that? I have always thought the itchiness was due to some kind of allergy, but I've noticed that when I have my sunglasses on while at the computer, the itchiness goes away. The thing is, I don't know if it's possible for light to cause itchiness. That seems odd. Is it because of the light, or just a weird coincidence?


Are they dry as well?

What kind of monitor do you have? What kind of lighting?



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11 Mar 2011, 7:20 pm

Yes I struggle to open my eyes when I leave my office. I also really struggle to concentrate with all the headlights driving in the dark.



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11 Mar 2011, 7:34 pm

Verdandi wrote:
Zen wrote:
I have a question. I know that I'm sensitive to light, but would itchy eyes also be a part of that? I have always thought the itchiness was due to some kind of allergy, but I've noticed that when I have my sunglasses on while at the computer, the itchiness goes away. The thing is, I don't know if it's possible for light to cause itchiness. That seems odd. Is it because of the light, or just a weird coincidence?


Are they dry as well?

What kind of monitor do you have? What kind of lighting?

I'm not sure. Eye drops don't help at all though. Cold compresses help temporarily, but then I thought, "Hello, there's no light when I have a compress on my eyes." :lol:

I have an LCD monitor now, which seems to cause less eye strain than my old CRT. I usually keep the lights in the room off, because they are CFLs, and just open the curtains during the day.



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11 Mar 2011, 7:40 pm

Zen wrote:
I'm not sure. Eye drops don't help at all though. Cold compresses help temporarily, but then I thought, "Hello, there's no light when I have a compress on my eyes." :lol:

I have an LCD monitor now, which seems to cause less eye strain than my old CRT. I usually keep the lights in the room off, because they are CFLs, and just open the curtains during the day.


Yeah, my old CRT did a number on my eyes. This new LCD is easier to look at, but someone else on this thread I think said that LCDs are basically backlit by fluorescents?

I'd leave my lights off but I can't touch type in the dark.



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11 Mar 2011, 7:43 pm

Zen wrote:
I usually keep the lights in the room off, because they are CFLs, and just open the curtains during the day.
I quite understand doing that with CFLs (they're horrible) but it's important to make sure that the screen isn't the brightest thing you're looking at.
That is, the room or the area near the screen should be reasonably well lit otherwise the effect of looking at (what's now) a relatively bright light source will be the same as oncoming headlights on a car. It's a contrast thing more than an absolute brightness thing.
I have a desk lamp near my screen which is pointed up at the wall near and behind it, so there's a fairly light background which also helps create a well-lit working area.


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11 Mar 2011, 7:50 pm

Verdandi wrote:
Yeah, my old CRT did a number on my eyes. This new LCD is easier to look at, but someone else on this thread I think said that LCDs are basically backlit by fluorescents?
Some are, but newer ones would more likely be lit by LEDs, and those would be running off DC with no flicker at all.
Also, those backlit by fluorescent lights would have them switched at a much higher frequency than domestic fluorescent lights so there would be no flicker. (well, technically there is, but it's several tens of thousand times per second instead of 60 (USA) or 50 (UK) times per second)


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11 Mar 2011, 7:55 pm

Cornflake wrote:
Zen wrote:
I usually keep the lights in the room off, because they are CFLs, and just open the curtains during the day.
I quite understand doing that with CFLs (they're horrible) but it's important to make sure that the screen isn't the brightest thing you're looking at.
That is, the room or the area near the screen should be reasonably well lit otherwise the effect of looking at (what's now) a relatively bright light source will be the same as oncoming headlights on a car. It's a contrast thing more than an absolute brightness thing.
I have a desk lamp near my screen which is pointed up at the wall near and behind it, so there's a fairly light background which also helps create a well-lit working area.


Ah, that is definitely the case when it's dark. I guess I should go buy some bulbs this weekend then. :lol: Thanks for the info.

I just checked and my monitor is CFL-based. But maybe getting better lighting for the room will help anyway.



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11 Mar 2011, 8:04 pm

Cornflake wrote:
Verdandi wrote:
Yeah, my old CRT did a number on my eyes. This new LCD is easier to look at, but someone else on this thread I think said that LCDs are basically backlit by fluorescents?
Some are, but newer ones would more likely be lit by LEDs, and those would be running off DC with no flicker at all.
Also, those backlit by fluorescent lights would have them switched at a much higher frequency than domestic fluorescent lights so there would be no flicker. (well, technically there is, but it's several tens of thousand times per second instead of 60 (USA) or 50 (UK) times per second)


I really do need a new monitor.



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11 Mar 2011, 8:06 pm

Zen wrote:
I just checked and my monitor is CFL-based. But maybe getting better lighting for the room will help anyway.
Yeah. CFL is just a fluorescent lamp running at a very high frequency - but the crap CFL quality is 'lost' because of the colour-generating stuff it shines through.
Flat-panel screens are generally very good these days, and far better than CRT screens which could very easily be accidentally set up incorrectly so they flickered horribly.


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11 Mar 2011, 8:11 pm

Cornflake wrote:
Zen wrote:
I just checked and my monitor is CFL-based. But maybe getting better lighting for the room will help anyway.
Yeah. CFL is just a fluorescent lamp running at a very high frequency - but the crap CFL quality is 'lost' because of the colour-generating stuff it shines through.
Flat-panel screens are generally very good these days, and far better than CRT screens which could very easily be accidentally set up incorrectly so they flickered horribly.


This was mine until a friend told me how to fix it.

Oh, the headaches.

I think I need to stock up on incandescent bulbs in preparation for the ban. The last time I had a CFL bulb was pretty bad (and I didn't even realize why :( )



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11 Mar 2011, 8:12 pm

I'm not 100% sure if I have sensory issues with light due to AS.

I keep all my curtains and blinds closed...but that's more to do with the fact the curtains are so cheap and thin it makes difference, I do feel the light when I go outside but that may just be due to keeping blinds and curtains closed...or due to problems with headaches...or being English and not used to sunshine.

I do wish I could wear sunglasses, the sun does really bother me at times...but then the headache from the weight of glasses on my nose, and the fact I look awful in glasses, is worse.


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