Polyester clothing is bad for everyone!

Page 1 of 1 [ 14 posts ] 

Surfman
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Aug 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,938
Location: Homeward bound

14 Jun 2011, 6:37 pm

from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyester#Health_effects

A study published in 1993 found that polyester underwear reduced sperm count and sperm motility in male dogs.[3] Similar studies have shown similar results in humans and rats. The cause is not known but is believed to be due to an electrostatic field created by the fabric.




I guess this means that tops and trousers have similar unhealthy effects, but they dont want to talk about it on wiki.

from http://www.articlesnatch.com/Article/We ... lth/961189


There are many good reasons to choose eco-friendly clothing over polyester clothing. Polyester clothing is produced using oil which is an obviously unsustainable resource. It also takes a large amount of energy to produce polyester and given that it is not biodegradeable, it fills up our land fills.

But new research is also suggesting that polyester may not be good for our health. Due to its synthetic structure, polyester clothing produces very strong electrostatic potential. Recently, researchers have begun exploring the impact of electrostatic potential on our health. This research is both enlightening and frightening.

One study, reference Shafik A, 2007, explored the effect of different types of textiles on pregnancy in 35 pregnant dogs divided equally into one control and four experimental groups. During pregnancy, the test groups were dressed in a garment made of either pure polyester, cotton or wool, or of a 50/50 polyester-cotton mix. Serum estradiol 17B and progesterone were measured before and every 15 days during pregnancy. Electrostatic potential was assessed on the skin before and after wearing the garment.

The dogs wearing cotton, wool and polyester-cotton mix as well as five of the seven wearing pure polyester garments had normal serum estradiol and progesterone during pregnancy and produced normal offspring. The remaining two animals of the group wearing pure polyester showed low serum progesterone levels in the first month of pregnancy and had spontaneous abortions. Mating was attempted in these two dogs during the subsequent estrous cycle without making them wear polyester garments. Serum levels of reproductive hormones were normal and they produced normal offspring. Electrostatic potential was detected on the skin of only the polyester dressed groups, and was higher in the pure than in the mixed polyester groups.

Given the low numbers involved in this study, conclusions could not be drawn. However, given the fact that low serum progesterone and abortion was observed only in the pure polyester group is a cause for concern. Abortion seemed to be due to the low serum progesterone which may have resulted from the injurious effect of EP on the ovarian or placental function.

Although this study was not statistically conclusive, past research, reference Shafik, 1999, conducted on human males was very clear. In the 1999 experiment, the impact of polyester on spermatogenesis was investigated. In that study, 11 male subjects wore polyester underwear. All subjects wearing the polyester underwear developed a significant electrostatic charge across the scrotum. Of the 11 subjects, 4 individuals developed a significant reduction in sperm count as well as testicular degeneration after 14 months. In a control group wearing cotton underwear, no changes in sperm count was observed.

Removal of the polyester underwear produced a complete reversal in affected subjects back to normal sperm count and elimination of the electrostatic potential.

The study went further to explore the possibility of using polyester as a male contraceptive. The contraceptive effect of a polyester sling applied to the scrotum was studied in 14 men who wore a polyester suspensor for 12 months.
The sling consisted of polyester fabric and was fashioned for the scrotum to lie within it.

The suspensor was used day and night and was changed when soiled. I won't get into the nitty gritty details but the end result is that ALL subjects became azoospermic, zero sperm counts, after approximately 140 days. The good news is that the process was reversible.

It seems clear to this author that polyester has a real and negative impact on the human body seemingly due to the significant electrostatic potential produced by the fabric.

If you are trying to have kids and are a man I would strongly suggest clearing all the polyester underwear out of your drawers! If you are a woman, I would suggest not taking any chances and avoid wearing polyester clothing, at least while pregnant. And while you are at it, stock up your wardrobe with some eco-friendly clothing items. Not only will the planet appreciate it, but maybe your health too!




Recently I slept a few nights in polyester thermal underwear and felt like s**t the next day



psych
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Nov 2005
Age: 42
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,488
Location: w london

14 Jun 2011, 7:57 pm

dont forget bedding - cheap duvets are typically polyester. So are some mattress covers/sheets so a lot of us are almost completely shrouded by it when we sleep.



BlueMage
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2009
Age: 129
Gender: Female
Posts: 297

14 Jun 2011, 8:15 pm

I hate acrylic. 100% cotton FTW.



jojobean
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Aug 2009
Age: 43
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,341
Location: In Georgia sipping a virgin pina' colada while the rest of the world is drunk

14 Jun 2011, 8:28 pm

This is is good information. Dont wear fake fabric during pregnacy. no, really, if it effects the body to that degree, what other body systems are negitivly effected by it???


_________________
All art is a kind of confession, more or less oblique. All artists, if they are to survive, are forced, at last, to tell the whole story; to vomit the anguish up.
-James Baldwin


Cash__
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Nov 2010
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,381
Location: Missouri

14 Jun 2011, 8:30 pm

I love polyester. Its all I wear for shirts in the summer time. Cotton shirts are too damn sticky in the summer time. All sticking and clinging to your skin. AAAaaaahhh. I hate it.

I don't wear polyester underwear, so I don't care about that part of the study.

Wearing a 100% poly shirt right now.



marshall
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Apr 2007
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,752
Location: Turkey

14 Jun 2011, 9:39 pm

Cash__ wrote:
I love polyester. Its all I wear for shirts in the summer time. Cotton shirts are too damn sticky in the summer time. All sticking and clinging to your skin. AAAaaaahhh. I hate it.

I don't wear polyester underwear, so I don't care about that part of the study.

Wearing a 100% poly shirt right now.

I don't really like the feel of polyester for being comfortable. It's kind of harsh on the skin. I use polyester stuff mostly for working out or other activities that get me wet, sweaty, or dirty. That way I don't ruin my good comfy feeling cotton stuff.



MooCow
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Feb 2011
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 546
Location: Under your bed.

15 Jun 2011, 1:04 am

I only wear cotton, I can't stand polyester.


_________________
I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it.
-Terry Pratchett


IdahoRose
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Feb 2007
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 19,801
Location: The Gem State

15 Jun 2011, 1:21 am

Polyester is one of my favorite fabrics. My two stuffed animals are made of it and so is the blanket on top of my bed. I also have a few clothing items that are made of it.

I'm not going to get pregnant and being eco-friendly isn't a priority of mine, so I won't be ditching polyester anytime soon.



Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 31,158
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

15 Jun 2011, 1:42 am

Well a couple things:
1. how many people wear only polyester most of the time?
2. depending on ones perspective a lowered sperm count can be either good or bad.
3. even cell phones pose health risks but I don't see everyone boycotting cell phones anytime soon.



OJani
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2011
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,505
Location: Hungary

15 Jun 2011, 3:48 am

I prefer to wear cotton for everyday use and polyester for sports. Sweating in a cotton shirt is not much pleasure, polyesters are far more friendly in this respect. Otherwise, I understand how the texture of a cotton cloth can feel better for the skin.


_________________
Another non-English speaking - DX'd at age 38
"Aut viam inveniam aut faciam." (Hannibal) - Latin for "I'll either find a way or make one."


Last edited by OJani on 15 Jun 2011, 4:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

Moog
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Feb 2010
Age: 41
Gender: Male
Posts: 17,671
Location: Untied Kingdom

15 Jun 2011, 4:20 am

I try to tell people this when I get picked up naked round the way, but they never buy it.

nudity > polyester


_________________
Not currently a moderator


kx250rider
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 15 May 2010
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,140
Location: Dallas, TX & Somis, CA

15 Jun 2011, 11:04 am

I don't give much of any credit to reports like that. Any group or person can do research and bend the results to reflect whatever they want them to, and this could be that way, or maybe it's not... But I never panic on this stuff. Look at coffee drinking: Just about every week a new official report comes out that says it will kill you, and next week it cures heart disease or something.... Take your pick 8) . I bet some day soon, we'll read a report that our sudden attempts to "stop global warming" is causing some kind of a plague someplace, or has bred a new kind of uncontrollable agriculture pest, etc.

My motto is "ALL THINGS IN MODERATION".

Charles



Surfman
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Aug 2010
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,938
Location: Homeward bound

15 Jun 2011, 2:47 pm

kx250rider wrote:
I don't give much of any credit to reports like that. Any group or person can do research and bend the results to reflect whatever they want them to, and this could be that way, or maybe it's not... But I never panic on this stuff. Look at coffee drinking: Just about every week a new official report comes out that says it will kill you, and next week it cures heart disease or something.... Take your pick 8) . I bet some day soon, we'll read a report that our sudden attempts to "stop global warming" is causing some kind of a plague someplace, or has bred a new kind of uncontrollable agriculture pest, etc.

My motto is "ALL THINGS IN MODERATION".

Charles


Shall we put lead back in fuels, paints etc?

What about some good ol 245T?

ALL??? things in moderation.

Sorry, someone just said I was ignorant..............

Last night i wore a polyester beanie. After 1 hour I had a headache. I switched to wool and no problem.

I guess some people are more sensitive to things



Bluefins
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Aug 2009
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 975

15 Jun 2011, 3:11 pm

kx250rider wrote:
I don't give much of any credit to reports like that. Any group or person can do research and bend the results to reflect whatever they want them to, and this could be that way, or maybe it's not... But I never panic on this stuff. Look at coffee drinking: Just about every week a new official report comes out that says it will kill you, and next week it cures heart disease or something.... Take your pick 8) . I bet some day soon, we'll read a report that our sudden attempts to "stop global warming" is causing some kind of a plague someplace, or has bred a new kind of uncontrollable agriculture pest, etc.

My motto is "ALL THINGS IN MODERATION".

Charles
Yes, the headlines are sensational. That doesn't mean science is nonexistant / pointless, it means it takes more than a soundbyte to express, and it's not 100% certain.

And how do you determine what "moderation" is, anyway?