Did you notice you were different when you were a kid?

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Did you notice you were different when you were a kid?
No, not in the slightest, in fact I'm suprised I have AS at all 1%  1%  [ 3 ]
No, not in the slightest, in fact I'm suprised I have AS at all 1%  1%  [ 3 ]
A little bit. It never really bothered me, though 4%  4%  [ 9 ]
A little bit. It never really bothered me, though 4%  4%  [ 9 ]
Mostly, it lingered in the back of my mind 8%  8%  [ 18 ]
Mostly, it lingered in the back of my mind 8%  8%  [ 18 ]
Quite a bit, I always wondered what the heck was going on 21%  21%  [ 49 ]
Quite a bit, I always wondered what the heck was going on 22%  22%  [ 51 ]
Absolutely, I knew it was painfully obvious since day one. 15%  15%  [ 34 ]
Absolutely, I knew it was painfully obvious since day one. 15%  15%  [ 34 ]
Total votes : 228

SolaCatella
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29 Sep 2006, 4:27 pm

I never noticed. Of course, I spent my elementary school years in a GT class gathered of kids from all over the county, and of these, one or two others apparantly had AS (I know one is diagnosed because we've kept in touch and my mother strongly suspects that one of my best friends was also an Aspie) and about half the class had ADD. Since the kids in the class never changed, I was never exposed to that many other kids my age, and I thought that obsessive interest in learning, poor coordination, and sporadic eye contact were norms, or at least not too uncommon--maybe on a par with glasses. I never met many other kids through extracurricular activities either; while I did participate in soccer (which I hated) my teammates were all a grade below me due to my being born right around the local cut-off area and I didn't associate with them much, preferring to make grass pyramids during practice and keep as far away from the ball as possible during games.

It was only in middle school, when we moved and I got thrown into a large school and, with the multiple teachers, got exposed to a lot of kids my own age that I finally figured out that I was a little unusual. :lol: Looking back, I think I was a lot luckier than a lot of people here.


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anbuend
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29 Sep 2006, 4:41 pm

I was actually, when exposed to GT environments... way out of the norm, and so far out of the norm that I saw no difference between GT environments and regular mainstream environments socially. In institutions I was slightly more normal but still usually the one who got picked on the most if someone was going to be picked on (it depended on the mix of people there, too), except if there were other autistic people or other extremely unusual people around and then we usually saw ourselves in each other and got along. And then in special ed I did not stand out all that much, mostly hung out with other autistic kids and kids with intellectual disabilities, and did not feel too different there.


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ADoyle
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29 Sep 2006, 6:03 pm

For me, it was obvious as growing up, I was the odd person out, and the #1 target of bullying. The only subject that was a problem was math, but I was one of the top readers in my class, even reading books that most people didn't read until high school at the earliest. I also had glasses to try and fix a strabismus or lazy eye in my left eye, and eventually braces to straighten my teeth.

By the time I was in my first year of middle school, my family moved about 5 miles away, and the bullying stopped. The only reason they moved was that they found a bigger house. It wasn't until I was nearly 30 that I finally got the diagnosis, as growing up, autism meant the classic low-functioning kind, not Aspergers or HFA.


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Snowfern
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01 Oct 2006, 6:38 am

i knew i was different so i kept my distance. as a kid, i never had a problem with not fitting in. i figured the rest simply weren't worth my time. i often read books of my own interest under the table during lessons and refused to participate in class if i felt it wasn't interesting or new.

this behaviour caused alot of problems for me cos the teachers kept calling my parents down to school regarding my behaviour. it wasn't that i was disruptive, it's just that i was 'difficult'. funny, i felt i was rather accomodating to my teacher's requests most of the time :P

i got into a good secondary school where there was an accelerated program for 'smarter' kids. i didn't do very well there because i didn't believe myself to be smart, my parents' constant belittling didn't help and who was i to challenge my mother's assessment? (she was a school teacher) those were the years i tried to fit in and socialize more, but it only made me more aware of how different i was, even though in my school, we were all considered 'different' and were groomed to be 'future leaders' *smirk*

imagine that. *shudder*

further education proved even more difficult as i struggled with the structured learning environment. i was unable to grasp theories without context, but i excelled in math and other application subjects. dropped out of junior college and polytechnic due to emotional imbalances (read: breakdowns) and other family commitments (read: mom's mad, gotta help out at home) respectively.

an extremely supportive friend i found online through a MUD convinced me that i wasn't stupid, he said i had alot of traits geniuses had, i just had too many things going against, i.e. family, wrong school etc etc. i half believed him and went back to school to get my advanced diploma. but i'm still disruptive to my own life and recently became unemployed (company downsized).

with the help of my very patient and loving boyfriend, i'm slowly picking up the shreds and tying in emotions and shedding light on why i remember many horrible things in my past but have seemingly no emotional attachment to.

but yea. i still feel quite the oddball. this would be the first forum i actually feel quite comfortable posting this much in. i have never been this active in any forum, not even the gaming ones ;P

*Edit: ok i guess what i'm saying is, this place is great! i finally feel like i fit in SOMEWHERE. you know how it is, words, explaining what i mean etc.... BAH!



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01 Oct 2006, 12:40 pm

I was always extremely strange in every way


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hadapurpura
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02 Oct 2006, 2:15 pm

I have been always quite odd in the eyes of other people, sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad, but yeah, I always knew that...



jread
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02 Oct 2006, 5:03 pm

I was always the outcast as a kid. My dad constantly told me that I was "different", but in a good way. He said that when I was a toddler I was very quiet and would usually sit in one place and stare at people. He said it kinda gave him the creeps sometimes when I'd stare at him because he felt like I was reading his mind.



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02 Oct 2006, 5:59 pm

I find this topic very confusing.

There are so many factors that could explain why I am the way I am, and I've never been able to work it all out. For example, I'm an only child, and therefore 'spoilt' and lacking in social skills. My parents divorced when I was about 12 and this made me depressed and cynical. I am a railway enthusiast and therefore a 'geek'. My parents were, in retrospect, almost totally unsuited which makes my existence some sort of genetic accident. Plus, of course, it is natural for most teenagers to feel alienated anyway, so I could never really tell what was average teenage angst and what was abnormal.

I knew something was different, but I didn't know what. Still don't, in fact. As I put in the "Questions about you 2" thread:

"Why are you here?
Trying to work things out. I have a number of different issues and I don't know whether I have AS or whether I'm just a depressed hypochondriac loser looking for an excuse! The name of the site certainly struck a chord and I can really identify with some of the forum comments so maybe I'm in the right place."

That's all I know.


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dbzgirl
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23 Oct 2006, 4:34 pm

Ever since around fourth grade, I've had a feeling of being different than everybody else, it was vague though; until I knew about AS, I thought everyone thought the same way I did, which of course, isn't true.



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23 Oct 2006, 5:53 pm

I don't remember when i found out i was different somewhere between age 5-9...


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23 Oct 2006, 6:29 pm

Just as soon as I had a better understanding of who I was, around 5 years old, I suddenly realized that I was very much different that all other kids. By the time I hit 7 years old, I knew, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that I was different. I couldn't tell you where and how I was different. Just that I didn't seem to be living in their reality.

I was a weird kid. A very, very weird kid. I did not integrate well with other kids. I could run around and play with the other kids but I could not comunicate or emote with them. I was just on some other wavelength than other kids.

I never knew who or what was real or unreal. Was it them or was it me that wasn't real???

Just as soon as I had a concept of self consciousness and began interacting with other kids, I knew I was different.

And even to this day, I have not stopped seeing the world through this fog that began before I can remember.



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23 Oct 2006, 6:56 pm

I was always different in so many ways, although I had no idea what was different or why. I was a full grown teen when I started realizing that the oddness I enjoyed was somewhat unique. Going back in time, mentally, there had to be more people on the spectrum in my school, statistically if nothing else, because my high school was huge. But I never met anyone like me before.


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Sixela
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23 Oct 2006, 9:56 pm

I don't remember not knowing I was different.



Pippen
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24 Oct 2006, 3:16 am

KBABZ wrote:
Two of my friends even help me and taught me things like saying Please and Thank You, not raising my voice and how to pick up sarcasm (they said it was lying by telling the truth!). I was nervous to learn new things, but they always ecouraged me to keep on trying. In a way this makes me feel like I'm half Aspie and half NT!


I love the sarcasm comment--what cute insight. :) We had to practice that quite a bit but how much better it would be coming from other kids in that way.

My kiddo started out in that world of half AS and half NT to begin with and his experience has been very much the same as yours. He's in a school that is pretty accepting of differences to begin with plus he's always had a friend or two that were accepting of him. It's not only helped him gradually pick up on the social aspects, but it's gone a long way in helping him become a happy, confident kid. He's got two really good buddies now...they play at school, have playdates at each other's houses, even did time in the principal's office together with four hours of school remaining in the school year. :roll:

I'll be interested down the road to find out if/when he noticed he was different. Back when his differences were more pronounced I got the feeling that any differences he might have picked up on were due to the fact that the *other* kids were different, not him.



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24 Oct 2006, 3:32 am

Thanks for that! Now I know I'm not one a one-in-a-million Aspie that got a lucky break as a kid. When I was younger, I did notice that I was different, but I just figured that I just had a little bit more trouble than everybody else in some areas, which I thought was natural. I've now got an entire group of friends I hang out with, and the number is around about 15 to 25. A few of them are more like aqauntinces, but we still hang out sometimes and talk to eachother. I reckon 25 is an extremely high number of friends for an Aspie to have at this stage in life (High School), so once again, I feel like the lucky one.

I came up with the randomest idea: It's KBABZ, saviour of all Aspies and Auties!! ! By day, he's just a typical NT, but by night, he's a full-blown Aspie intend of good deeds and helping people out! But, when his fellow Aspies find out that he's half NT, some of them lay distrust and betray him, as do some of his NT friends when they find out he's half Aspie! But KBABZ's accepting friends help him out through all this turmoil and they will triumph above!! !