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btbnnyr
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18 Dec 2011, 7:37 pm

I heard about autism before I heard about AS. I never associated any negative stereotypes with autism, and I never felt any stigma associated with autism. I didn't know that the stigma existed. After I was diagnosed, I was shocked to discover that the stigma existed and was indeed pervasive and ingrained. I never picked up on it myself. Maybe that was because nothing that I ever heard about autism seemed "different" to me, or maybe it was because I was impervious to social messages in general.



btbnnyr
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18 Dec 2011, 7:39 pm

Online, the worst communications that I had with a person were with a person who refused to acknowledge AS as autism and considered AS to be a superior awesome condition that the person believed that the person had.



Verdandi
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18 Dec 2011, 7:48 pm

Yeah, I'd heard of autism long before AS, but I knew very little about it and didn't know many of the negative stereotypes.

At most, I knew that autistic people didn't like change and had social skill deficits. I also learned that many couldn't talk, but I was never under the impression that being autistic meant always being unable to talk ever or having a delay in learning how to talk.

The often repeated "nonverbal child sitting in a corner banging their head" was not something I had heard until I saw Aspies complaining about the DSM-V changes.



Dae
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18 Dec 2011, 9:09 pm

I got VERY confused reading this thread. I'm hoping somebody can put it to me in plain language...Is the following correct?: Asperger's is AN autism but not the same autism that Autism is? And, is it considered 'exclusionary' to refer to Autistics/Auties as 'Aspies'...because the term 'Aspies' isn't inclusionary of those with Autism? Please excuse any offense my ignorance may cause/may have caused in ANY of my posts. -Oh, AND: Can the term 'Auties' be used to refer to those with Autism and/or to those with Asperger's? Thank you.


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Verdandi
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18 Dec 2011, 9:36 pm

Dae wrote:
I got VERY confused reading this thread. I'm hoping somebody can put it to me in plain language...Is the following correct?: Asperger's is AN autism but not the same autism that Autism is? And, is it considered 'exclusionary' to refer to Autistics/Auties as 'Aspies'...because the term 'Aspies' isn't inclusionary of those with Autism? Please excuse any offense my ignorance may cause/may have caused in ANY of my posts. -Oh, AND: Can the term 'Auties' be used to refer to those with Autism and/or to those with Asperger's? Thank you.


1) There's a lot of evidence that Asperger's is not easily distinguishable from autism. There are a lot of features in autism that can be absent or present, and Asperger's is defined entirely by the absence of particular features - and at least one of those features is relatively common in people diagnosed with AS (delays in self-help and adaptive skills) and another feature is routinely ignored (must not meet the criteria for autism). Most people diagnosed with AS should have been diagnosed with autism.

2) "Aspies" is a term referring to people who are diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome, an identity signifier. When used to refer to the entire spectrum, it excludes people who are diagnosed elsewhere on the spectrum (autism or PDD-NOS, for example). "Auties" is a term used to refer to people who are diagnosed elsewhere on the spectrum.

As far as it goes, I find both terms painfully cute and don't identify with them.



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18 Dec 2011, 10:06 pm

aspie56 wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
aspie56 wrote:
pete1061 wrote:
aspie56 wrote:
...snip... And why do ya think a 14 year old would put their 33? hm??...snip...


I'm guessing you are not completely familiar with you account settings.
You can click on "My Account", up in the top right, then click on "Edit Profile".
Then about the 4th item down is a spot where you can click on "edit birthday".

There you can enter your proper birth date, and select on how you want that info displayed.


Dude.. I been on other forums , I know how to use User CPs account settings etc.. im not changing my age ..



Okay, don't be surprised if people might think you are a troll or a liar because when someone lies about their age in their profile, how are we going to know they aren't lying about other stuff they say in their posts? How do we even know you are really 14 and not just someone who is saying they are just so people go easy on them?



The only reason I put 33 is so i could take a view at the OTHER forums like the Mature one , etc.



Okay, why didn't you put you were 18 or even hide your birth date? :shrugs:



League_Girl
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18 Dec 2011, 10:18 pm

pensieve wrote:
nat4200 wrote:
pensieve wrote:
TheygoMew wrote:
I am HFA. I wish the selection under the profile included HFA, PDD-NOS etc..

Yes there is a difference but that does not mean aspergers is not on the spectrum nor do aspies not need assistance or help. I've read parents who think because of aspergers included on the spectrum which correct me if I'm wrong but aspergers has been around since the 40's, that they think the aspies are limiting their more severe LFA child or adults as if aspies are draining resources like vampires.

I am close to aspie as an adult but not quite. That is why I have chosen other autism spectrum disorder because aspergers isn't quite right.

Anyways, I'm not sure if the OP was really trying to say aspergers is a false autism spectrum disorder or not.

Asperger's was added to the DSM in the 1990's. Sure, it existed but you could be diagnosed with it.


I didn't meet the criteria for Asperger's in the late '80s, not sure what it means if what you say is true


It was a typo.
I'm certain it was added in the 90's. Maybe they were trying to diagnose it in the 80's before it was an official DSM dx.


My psychiatrist was diagnosing it in the 80's. I was surprised because AS wasn't even known in the USA until 1991 but he kept up with autism through documents.



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18 Dec 2011, 10:45 pm

I have never heard if autism before AS. I was 13 when I first heard if it when I saw Mercury Rising. My parents never told me AS was a form of autism when I was diagnosed. I was 15 when I found out when I looked it up online so I can read more about it. I asked my parents if I was autistic and they said no. I asked them why does it show up when I look up AS online and they said it was because it's a form of it. They both think AS and autism are two different things and that AS is not autism and it's on the spectrum and a form of it but it's not autism.

Some people think AS and autism are two different things and that AS isn't autism.

It took me years to accept AS was autism and it used to be my biggest pet peeve when AS get called autism. I also used to get confused when someone say they have AS and then say they are autistic so I thought they had both but wondered how could that be because you couldn't have both at once. I also would feel mislead when I read a news article on an autistic person only to find out they have AS. Then I decided what if my own parents were wrong and that AS really is autism. I have to remember that back in their childhood days, autism was at the severe end of the spectrum. Anyone high functioning or anyone that could talk were not diagnosed. So perhaps they were still stuck on that definition of autism. I am surprised they didn't think autism was schizophrenia or that once you could talk you were no longer autistic. Plus my mom didn't say Temple wasn't autistic despite how high functioning she was as a child and adult.



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19 Dec 2011, 12:09 am

pensieve wrote:
Asperger's was added to the DSM in the 1990's. Sure, it existed but you couldn't be diagnosed with it.


Yeah, I know. I'm just pointing out that aspergers is treated like the new kid on the autistic block as if it's some new concept yet Hans Aspergers written about it in 1944. Back then it was autistic psychopathy. Plenty of Americans are not accepting of aspergers as apart of the spectrum because what they grew up seeing was LFA examples splashed on their tv screens.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hr1HF6a0w40[/youtube]

and here is the first boy to be diagnosed by Kanner.

http://bcove.me/wcy1smm8



unduki
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19 Dec 2011, 12:18 am

aspie56 wrote:
I know im not weird.. I know have some form of Aspergers.


People with Aspergers are weird. I mean that in the nicest of ways...


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19 Dec 2011, 12:26 am

SuperTrouper wrote:
Every time someone brings this up I get the feeling that someone's saying, without saying, that people with Asperger's are better than people with autistic disorder. Maybe I'm just being hypersensitive, but I don't like the feeling behind these posts. Like, "Let's get one thing straight, I may be different but I'm GOOD different, not BAD different like those autistics!"

And I'll repeat myself for the hundredth time...

What is it about me that you so fear to be associated with? I'm pretty, I'm very smart, and I have lots of friends. I'm clean, I dress well if slightly quirkily, and I'm generally pretty accepting of other people. What is it about me that's so awful? I'm a person too, and I have feelings and whatnot (GASP- the "MFA" has feelings?!) and it upsets me when people act like they don't want to associate with me.

Anyway, that might not be the message the OP was trying to send, but that's kind of how it came across.
Me too. Asperger's, LFA, MFA, HFA, PDD-NOS, autistic disorder... it's all autism.



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19 Dec 2011, 12:39 am

TheygoMew wrote:
pensieve wrote:
Asperger's was added to the DSM in the 1990's. Sure, it existed but you couldn't be diagnosed with it.


Yeah, I know. I'm just pointing out that aspergers is treated like the new kid on the autistic block as if it's some new concept yet Hans Aspergers written about it in 1944. Back then it was autistic psychopathy. Plenty of Americans are not accepting of aspergers as apart of the spectrum because what they grew up seeing was LFA examples splashed on their tv screens.


Also, the fact that so many people take it on faith that Kanner's patients were all "low functioning*," even though this was far from the case:

http://ballastexistenz.wordpress.com/20 ... torically/

http://ballastexistenz.wordpress.com/20 ... ereotypes/

* I use this terminology under protest



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19 Dec 2011, 12:41 am

SuperTrouper wrote:
Every time someone brings this up I get the feeling that someone's saying, without saying, that people with Asperger's are better than people with autistic disorder. Maybe I'm just being hypersensitive, but I don't like the feeling behind these posts. Like, "Let's get one thing straight, I may be different but I'm GOOD different, not BAD different like those autistics!"

And I'll repeat myself for the hundredth time...

What is it about me that you so fear to be associated with? I'm pretty, I'm very smart, and I have lots of friends. I'm clean, I dress well if slightly quirkily, and I'm generally pretty accepting of other people. What is it about me that's so awful? I'm a person too, and I have feelings and whatnot (GASP- the "MFA" has feelings?!) and it upsets me when people act like they don't want to associate with me.

Anyway, that might not be the message the OP was trying to send, but that's kind of how it came across.



I'm going to add to the other people who've said this, but I find this offensive too, despite being labeled with Asperger's particularly. Forcing this sort of separation is not helpful, not accurate, and offensive.

I've also found that I can't actually relate to any of the people who think that Asperger's is this mild thing that isn't "really autism" and isn't really a disorder. No. I'm diagnosed with Asperger's. I'm disabled. I relate to people with the diagnosis of classic autism. I find it offensive to have people tell me that I'm not autistic, or that I'm somehow better than people with a different diagnosis because my difficulties are such that I'd get a different label.

There's definitely a solid group of us on here who agree with your assessment and also find it offensive, including people who are the "Good Different".



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19 Dec 2011, 12:49 am

I find it interesting that Donald - the first person to ever be diagnosed with autism by Leo Kanner - was described as "really really smart" by others who attended high school with him.

That's an interesting contrast to the sheer number of people who seem to think that being autistic excludes being "smart."

Tuttle wrote:
I'm going to add to the other people who've said this, but I find this offensive too, despite being labeled with Asperger's particularly. Forcing this sort of separation is not helpful, not accurate, and offensive.

I've also found that I can't actually relate to any of the people who think that Asperger's is this mild thing that isn't "really autism" and isn't really a disorder. No. I'm diagnosed with Asperger's. I'm disabled. I relate to people with the diagnosis of classic autism. I find it offensive to have people tell me that I'm not autistic, or that I'm somehow better than people with a different diagnosis because my difficulties are such that I'd get a different label.

There's definitely a solid group of us on here who agree with your assessment and also find it offensive, including people who are the "Good Different".


I wanted to bold that for emphasis and agreement.



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19 Dec 2011, 12:58 am

Verdandi wrote:
I find it interesting that Donald - the first person to ever be diagnosed with autism by Leo Kanner - was described as "really really smart" by others who attended high school with him.

That's an interesting contrast to the sheer number of people who seem to think that being autistic excludes being "smart."

Tuttle wrote:
I'm going to add to the other people who've said this, but I find this offensive too, despite being labeled with Asperger's particularly. Forcing this sort of separation is not helpful, not accurate, and offensive.

I've also found that I can't actually relate to any of the people who think that Asperger's is this mild thing that isn't "really autism" and isn't really a disorder. No. I'm diagnosed with Asperger's. I'm disabled. I relate to people with the diagnosis of classic autism. I find it offensive to have people tell me that I'm not autistic, or that I'm somehow better than people with a different diagnosis because my difficulties are such that I'd get a different label.

There's definitely a solid group of us on here who agree with your assessment and also find it offensive, including people who are the "Good Different".


I wanted to bold that for emphasis and agreement.
It angers me when I meet someone who doesn't know much of anything about ASD's, and they think that every autistic is mentally retarded. But I manage to stay calm, because I can educate them if they're willing to listen.



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19 Dec 2011, 1:03 am

SyphonFilter wrote:
I wanted to bold that for emphasis and agreement.
It angers me when I meet someone who doesn't know much of anything about ASD's, and they think that every autistic is mentally retarded. But I manage to stay calm, because I can educate them if they're willing to listen.[/quote]

On one occasion I got that line from a psychiatrist. I linked a study that debunked the idea and he never replied. I mean, the problem this causes is two-fold: Writing diagnosed autistic children off as barely intelligent when this is very likely not the case; Refusing to diagnose others for being "too smart to be on the autistic spectrum." And the latter has been used to tell people they can't be diagnosed with AS, PDD-NOS, or autism.