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Which category describes you the best?
NSC - Have a diagnosis 10%  10%  [ 5 ]
NSC - Self-diagnosed 8%  8%  [ 4 ]
SASC - Have a diagnosis 2%  2%  [ 1 ]
SASC - Self-diagnosed 2%  2%  [ 1 ]
WISC - Have a diagnosis 6%  6%  [ 3 ]
WISC - Self-diagnosed 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
ESC - Have a diagnosis 34%  34%  [ 17 ]
ESC - Self-diagnosed 22%  22%  [ 11 ]
CSC - Have a diagnosis 12%  12%  [ 6 ]
CSC - Self-diagnosed 2%  2%  [ 1 ]
SCSC - Have a diagnosis 2%  2%  [ 1 ]
SCSC - Self-diagnosed 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
RSC - Have a diagnosis 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
RSC - Self-diagnosed 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 50

OJani
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23 Dec 2011, 1:35 am

Ganondox wrote:
Is there a version of the quiz that isn't in 3rd person?

No, because this quiz is primarily for caregivers (parents) of kids. However, I don't think that this quiz requires more "thinking with others' mind" than the usual quizzes like the AQ test and the Aspie-quiz.



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23 Dec 2011, 2:16 am

CSC according to the test, but reading through that PDF makes me think that WISC is a better fit.
I have a theory that my intelligence is working hard to mask/compensate for a lot of problems.


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23 Dec 2011, 6:09 am

Having read the paper, WISC is definitely by far the best fit (a lot of it seems like it could have been written about me), though I have some ESC traits.

I found a lot of the questions difficult to answer, but the result was ESC.



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23 Dec 2011, 10:07 am

I'll stick with CSC.

I think it is the most accurate for how I started out but that the prognosis hardly applies to me. I'm basically a CSC who naturally developed past the "this is what they start out like as kids".

But I didn't develop into a ESC or a NSC because these sound like whole other categories that people start out in, not develop into. Or maybe others do, I'm trying to picture what that would be like. Edit: I did get ESC and NSC for what I can sometimes appear like.


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23 Dec 2011, 10:19 am

OJani wrote:
Ganondox wrote:
Is there a version of the quiz that isn't in 3rd person?

No, because this quiz is primarily for caregivers (parents) of kids. However, I don't think that this quiz requires more "thinking with others' mind" than the usual quizzes like the AQ test and the Aspie-quiz.


Well one is for some reason I don't really know what aloof means exactly, and two is that I don't think I'm self-aware enough to accurately answer a quiz in this style.


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23 Dec 2011, 10:56 am

Ganondox wrote:
OJani wrote:
Ganondox wrote:
Is there a version of the quiz that isn't in 3rd person?

No, because this quiz is primarily for caregivers (parents) of kids. However, I don't think that this quiz requires more "thinking with others' mind" than the usual quizzes like the AQ test and the Aspie-quiz.


Well one is for some reason I don't really know what aloof means exactly, and two is that I don't think I'm self-aware enough to accurately answer a quiz in this style.


I agree the whole 3rd person view of the test completely threw me off.

And what the hell does "aloof" mean?

Another thing that throws the test off is that it's geared for behavior at a young age. It's just plain tough to remember with any accuracy things like that from 30 years ago. That's part of the difficulty in diagnosing adults. All the material out there is geared for diagnosing kids.


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23 Dec 2011, 2:31 pm

I got ESC when I took the quiz for how I was when I was a child. I took it again for me now, and was surprised to get NSC!



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23 Dec 2011, 2:56 pm

I thought that the whole thing - the literature, the quiz - was overgeneralized, which was why the CSC prognosis was so far off for me. It doesn't take into account the unevenness of traits in an autistic child. Within a profile, a lot of the traits don't occur in lockstep at all. You can be totally socially aloof and lack spoken language skills while doing well on other verbal skills like reading and writing, including figurative language. You can pick up on a significant number of social cues and be good at spoken communication while not getting figurative language at all. It seems to think that first child will not have as good an outcome as the second child, since the second child is more farther ahead socially and better at communication at the same age.



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23 Dec 2011, 3:22 pm

First, thank you all for the votes and thoughts.

I understand and agree with you that it's a bit difficult to imagine yourself as a kid as you appeared from the outside back then. TBH, it was less difficult for me because previously I had to submit a questionnaire as a part of my preliminary evaluation and I had to virtually go through my childhood with my parents as we discussed the answers to the questions. So, when this classification came up I just read through it and I was glad I could identify myself with ESC, and felt the description matched my traits more than any other description I ever had seen. It was thorough, provided explanations that made sense, and debunked a couple of myths about the differences among Aspies. It was a fascinating experience.

Reading your input I see that this quiz doesn't come close to the accuracy that one can achieve by reading the descriptions of types in the original text, while I'm curious, what if parents could do the quiz instead of us? Chances are, results would be a lot more accurate...

As for what 'aloof' means, pretending I know, uh, wouldn't be wise. You know, English isn't my first language. But, here it is: "Distant physically or emotionally; reserved and remote", from TheFreeDictionary. :wink:

edit: (from the above dictionary) aloof - Comes from sailing, in which ships keep clear of coastal rocks by holding the vessel "luff"—"to the windward"; so, to hold "a-luff" means to "keep clear."


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Last edited by OJani on 23 Dec 2011, 3:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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23 Dec 2011, 3:36 pm

Another thing that I thought when I read the paper was that the profiles and outcomes might be getting less and less accurate the farther and farther they diverge from NSC, the profile of the authors. The authors become increasingly mind-blind to the children from WISC to ESC to CSC to SCSC, so their assumptions about the children's abilities and disabilities and developmental trajectories become increasingly off. Perhaps the majority within each group does conform to their expectations though, but I wonder how big the nonconforming minority is and how and why they developed the outcomes they did, whether more or less towards the NSC end a adults.



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23 Dec 2011, 4:13 pm

btbnnyr wrote:
Another thing that I thought when I read the paper was that the profiles and outcomes might be getting less and less accurate the farther and farther they diverge from NSC, the profile of the authors. The authors become increasingly mind-blind to the children from WISC to ESC to CSC to SCSC, so their assumptions about the children's abilities and disabilities and developmental trajectories become increasingly off. Perhaps the majority within each group does conform to their expectations though, but I wonder how big the nonconforming minority is and how and why they developed the outcomes they did, whether more or less towards the NSC end a adults.

Interesting. Maybe they have fewer kids in those less abled categories? Also, each individual can have different patterns in terms of developmental speed. This effect can be naturally more pronounced in these categories than in the upper ones, where there's less room for divergence.

I suffered a setback when I was around 8-9, had severe issues with behavior, and started to stutter. Eventually, I become more aloof than I was before, and I guess this was the primary reason why I stuck at ESC for long.



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23 Dec 2011, 5:09 pm

btbnnyr wrote:
Another thing that I thought when I read the paper was that the profiles and outcomes might be getting less and less accurate the farther and farther they diverge from NSC, the profile of the authors. The authors become increasingly mind-blind to the children from WISC to ESC to CSC to SCSC, so their assumptions about the children's abilities and disabilities and developmental trajectories become increasingly off.
This is an interesting point.

As I said, I feel that WISC describes me very well. I actually found the paper incredibly useful since it illuminated a situation that I think caused me a lot of problems when I was younger: adults didn't see me as disabled, but my peers relentlessly bullied me because my issues were perceived much more accurately by them than by adults.

I really do feel like adults typically were really blinded by my (at least theoretical) intellectual abilities. I think a kid who seems intellectually gifted and is not "disruptive" (i.e. hyperactive) is probably very easy to overlook even if there are very significant issues elsewhere. For me it was not until bullying got so out of hand that I had blatantly obvious problems (like going into full-on meltdown when it was time to go to school, and eventually not being able to attend) that anyone seemed to realize there was anything wrong, though I tend to wonder if even were it not for the bullying, my executive function issues (which are a major problem for me in college, to the point where I'm pursuing being evaluated for ADHD) would have started to noticeably work against my supposed intellectual gifts.



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23 Dec 2011, 6:09 pm

I should give it to my mother to solve it, but I did it by myself and I got ESC.

Well, it describes me very well. No surprise here.



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23 Dec 2011, 7:30 pm

OJani wrote:
...snip...

As for what 'aloof' means, pretending I know, uh, wouldn't be wise. You know, English isn't my first language. But, here it is: "Distant physically or emotionally; reserved and remote", from TheFreeDictionary. ...snip...


I do remember some people describing me as "out of it" when I was a kid.


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23 Dec 2011, 8:31 pm

ESC - Self-diagnosed.

I hate taking a test and then finding out I have to log in to get results. It makes me feel tricked to not know in advance of the requirement, as though the test is just a ploy to get new members to sign up. That's why I closed the window for signing up at the end, and that's how I discovered signing up wasn't really necessary.

No surprise, I had to do my best to remember how I was and guess at how I was perceived by others back then. It's been a long time. But I guess I did okay enough.


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