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JonDevine
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20 Oct 2006, 9:55 pm

Aspie_Chav wrote:
If I don’t have AS, then the whole existence of AS should be brought into questioned. I am the complete stereo typical, textbook example of AS is. Nobody can ever tell me that I don’t have AS. Not NT or Aspie. No false logic can make me believe that I a NT.

JonDevine wrote:
I know what you mean by wanting to have it. I myself have not been diagnosed, and I am not saying that I definitely have it, but I do feel a strong desire to see if I do have AS.


Do you think that a professional quack NT can tell you if you have AS. If you put your faith in NT man and not your own logical deduction, then you probably are an NT yourself.


I don't know wether or not to take this as an insult or not. But I can say this: I'm not an expert in the psychological/neurological field (no matter how interested in I am). But I do feel that someone who is trained would have a better opinion. But I can see a point in saying that some people make mistakes. SO if that's the case, then all diagnosi can be discarded, because they are opinion and not fact?


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20 Oct 2006, 11:08 pm

JonDevine wrote:
Do you think that a professional quack NT can tell you if you have AS. If you put your faith in NT man and not your own logical deduction, then you probably are an NT yourself.


I don't know wether or not to take this as an insult or not. But I can say this: I'm not an expert in the psychological/neurological field (no matter how interested in I am). But I do feel that someone who is trained would have a better opinion. But I can see a point in saying that some people make mistakes. SO if that's the case, then all diagnosi can be discarded, because they are opinion and not fact?[/quote]

I dont agree with that, you know yourself better then a doctor can tell you. Believe it or not, just because they are a "doctor" doesnt mean they had special insight. You can read the same books they do.



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20 Oct 2006, 11:35 pm

Wel, wikipedia says:

Quote:
AS is characterized by:[4][5]

Limited interests or preoccupation with a subject to the exclusion of other activities;
Repetitive behaviors or rituals;
Peculiarities in speech and language;
Socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior and interpersonal interaction;
Problems with nonverbal communication; and,
Clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements.



Social differences
Although there is no single feature that all people with AS share, difficulties with social behavior are nearly universal and are one of the most important defining criteria. People with AS lack the natural ability to see the subtexts of social interaction, and may lack the ability to communicate their own emotional state, resulting in well-meaning remarks that may offend, or finding it hard to know what is "acceptable". The unwritten rules of social behavior that mystify so many with AS have been termed the "hidden curriculum".[13] People with AS must learn these social skills intellectually rather than intuitively.[14]

Non-autistics are able to gather information about other people's cognitive and emotional states based on clues gleaned from the environment and other people's facial expression and body language, but, in this respect, people with AS are impaired; this is sometimes called mind-blindness.[15] Mind-blindness involves an impaired ability to read others' feelings, understand intended meanings, gauge level of interest in a conversation, take into account others' level of knowledge and predict someone's reaction to a comment or action.[16]

Some people with AS make very little eye contact because it triggers a possible threat response,[17] whereas others have unmodulated, staring eye contact that can cause discomfort in other people.[18] Similarly, the use of gestures may be almost nonexistent or may seem exaggerated and differ from what would normally be considered the most appropriate for a situation.[19]

A person with AS may have trouble understanding the emotions of other people: the messages that are conveyed by facial expression, eye contact and body language are often missed. They also might have trouble showing empathy with other people. Thus, people with AS might be seen as egotistical, selfish or uncaring. In most cases, these are unfair labels because affected people are neurologically unable to understand other people's emotional states. They are usually shocked, upset and remorseful when told that their actions are hurtful or inappropriate. It is clear that people with AS do not lack emotions. The concrete nature of emotional attachments they might have (i.e., to objects rather than to people), however, often seems curious or can even be a cause of concern to people who do not share their perspective.[20]

Failing to show affection—or not doing so in conventional ways—does not necessarily mean that people with AS do not feel it. Understanding this can lead partners or care-givers to feel less rejected and to be more understanding. There are usually ways to work around the problems, such as being more explicit about one's needs. For instance, when describing emotions, it can be helpful to be direct and to avoid vague terms such as "upset" when the emotion being described is anger—some individuals with AS would interpret "upset" as mere annoyance, or even nausea. It is often effective to present in clear language what the problem is, and to ask the partner with AS to describe what emotions are being felt, or to ask why a certain emotion was being felt. It is helpful if the family member or significant other reads as much as he or she can about AS and any comorbid disorders.[21] Sometimes, the opposite problem occurs; the person with AS is unusually affectionate to significant others and misses or misinterprets signals from the other partner, causing the partner stress.[22]

[edit]
Speech and language differences
People with AS typically have a highly pedantic way of speaking, using a far more formal register of language than appropriate for a context. A five-year-old child with this condition may regularly speak in language that could easily have come from a university textbook, especially concerning his or her special area of interest.[23]

Literal interpretation is another common, but not universal hallmark of this condition. Attwood gives the example of a girl with AS who answered the telephone one day and was asked, "Is Paul there?" Although the Paul in question was in the house, he was not in the room with her, so after looking around to ascertain this, she simply said "no" and hung up. The person on the other end had to call back and explain to her that he meant for her to find him and get him to pick up the telephone.[24]

Individuals with AS may use words idiosyncratically, including new coinages and unusual juxtapositions. This can develop into a rare gift for humor (especially puns, wordplay, doggerel and satire). A potential source of humor is the eventual realization that their literal interpretations can be used to amuse others. Some are so proficient at written language as to qualify as hyperlexic. Tony Attwood refers to a particular child's skill at inventing expressions, e.g., "tidying down" (the opposite of tidying up) or "broken" (when referring to a baby brother who cannot walk or talk).[25]

Children with AS may show advanced abilities for their age in language, reading, mathematics, spatial skills, or music, sometimes into the 'gifted' range, but these talents may be counterbalanced by appreciable delays in the development of other cognitive functions.[26] Some other typical behaviors are echolalia, the repetition or echoing of verbal utterances made by another person, and palilalia, the repetition of one's own words.[27]

A 2003 study investigated the written language of children and youth with AS. They were compared to neurotypical peers in a standardized test of written language skills and legibility of handwriting. In written language skills, no significant differences were found between standardized scores of both groups; however, in hand-writing skills, the AS participants produced significantly fewer legible letters and words than the neurotypical group. Another analysis of written samples found that people with AS appear to be able to write quantitatively similarly to their neurotypical peers using grammatical rules, but have difficulty in producing qualitative writing.[28]


Other differences
Those affected by AS may show a range of other sensory, developmental, and physiological anomalies. Children with AS may evidence a slight delay in the development of fine motor skills.


In general, orderly things appeal to people with AS. Some researchers mention the imposition of rigid routines (on self or others) as a criterion for diagnosing this condition. It appears that changes to their routines cause inordinate levels of anxiety for some people with this condition.[37]

Some people with AS experience varying degrees of sensory overload and are extremely sensitive to touch, smells, sounds, tastes, and sights. They may prefer soft clothing, familiar scents, or certain foods. Some may even be pathologically sensitive to loud noises (as some people with AS have hyperacusis), strong smells, or dislike being touched; for example, certain children with AS exhibit a strong dislike of having their head touched or their hair disturbed while others like to be touched but dislike loud noises. Sensory overload may exacerbate problems faced by such children at school, where levels of noise in the classroom can become intolerable for them.[34] Some are unable to block out certain repetitive stimuli, such as the constant ticking of a clock. Whereas most children stop registering this sound after a short time and can hear it only if they consciously attend to it, a child with AS can become distracted, agitated, or even (in cases where the child has problems with regulating emotions such as anger) aggressive if the sound persists.[38] A study of parent measures of child temperament found that children with autism were rated as presenting with more extreme scores than typically-developing children.[39]




That is SCARY! ALL MY LIFE I was told I was odd! I FELT odd! Sometimes I heard some autistic symptoms, and thought for an INSTANT I was autistic. But I am FAR from stupid. I can also communicate well. And NOW, I find THIS! I guess I have aspergers! It almost makes me want to start looking for others with AS! Some associated symptoms are disinterest with dates and sports! This EVEN explains THAT! I WILL say that my handwriting is BETTER than the typical group though. Until recently, it changed LITTLE. MOST peoples writing changes within a year or two, and it often becomes LESS legible. Doctors are NOTORIOUS for it.

This EVEN explains why I can be the ONLY one on an A319 that notices the ABSURD flashing of the cabin lights before the engines start. There lucky I am not the purchaser of a major customer, they would go BANKRUPT!

Steve



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21 Oct 2006, 2:55 am

Were you being serious or not? I can't tell!

I was with a group of people last night, and I noticed, they could all talk to each other, and enjoy each others company, talking about NOTHING for over 2 hours.. It blew my mind that most people actually socialise just to socialise, for me we're either sharing facts, sharing pleasure, or keeping out of each others way..

I think the diagnosis is valid in reference to what a lot of other people think, but you yourself know what you are, better than anyone, though this "self" is a constantly evolving thing.

"I'm just like a clock upon the wall, always moving, but never going anywhere"


"I've seen your shine, it seems divine, but by the way, you're clouded, I'm clouded!"


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21 Oct 2006, 9:05 am

Scintillate wrote:
Were you being serious or not? I can't tell!


Now that's a classic!

The classics never get old.


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goomba
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21 Oct 2006, 9:28 am

werbert wrote:
If you give ten different psychiatrists one patient to analyze, they will come up with ten different diagnoses.

And if you haven't ben brainwashed by Christianity, you probably have above average intelligence.

Serious... I've seen about that many and each said a different thing. Haha!



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21 Oct 2006, 10:13 am

I am an "oldie" in my 50's.

When I was a kid I was really screwed up but Aspergers wasn't "invented" then. The shrinks didn't know what to make of me.

Now I can see that I have AS. My father had AS and my son has AS.

How can I be sure? I probably have a higher IQ than most of the shrinks.

My wife of 30+ years is bipolar. The doctors try to push me around until I say "Listen, dumbass, I have been dealing with this problem since before you were born!

Ask three shrinks the time of day and you will get three different answers.



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21 Oct 2006, 11:22 am

I know what you mean, I can tell my father has AS, and from what I can tell it seems his father had the same symptoms. I'm the first in the line for a while to not be an alcoholic, and also the first to seek a diagnosis, but I'm also the first that spent a childhood trying desperately to hide the way I am and blowing up in anger, win some lose some eh.. :)


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03 Nov 2006, 7:28 pm

Wombat wrote:
I am an "oldie" in my 50's.

When I was a kid I was really screwed up but Aspergers wasn't "invented" then. The shrinks didn't know what to make of me.

Now I can see that I have AS. My father had AS and my son has AS.

How can I be sure? I probably have a higher IQ than most of the shrinks.

My wife of 30+ years is bipolar. The doctors try to push me around until I say "Listen, dumbass, I have been dealing with this problem since before you were born!

Ask three shrinks the time of day and you will get three different answers.


(sorry to go off topic everyone)

Hi Wombat - I don't see a post in "getting to know each other" yet, so welcome. I'm guessing you are also from the antipodes? I am 47 y.o. - see you around the forums.

Do you like to eat leaves and tree roots? :lol:


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