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Dear_one
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07 Dec 2022, 6:13 pm

Mountain Goat wrote:
We assume certain technologies arrived atcertain dates, and while in general it maybe correct and true, there are often these exceptions found which later which prove us wrong!


The mix gets extreme on the frontiers, where someone may be living with mostly stone-age technology, but also hires an aircraft, or owns a snowmobile.
"Damascus steel" is still exceptionally good for moderate temperature uses, and learning how it was made was just about the last thing we discovered about steel. (not to be confused with "make your own" versions on YouTube.) We only began to learn how to improve materials scientifically after experiments on glass, which got the researcher fired, but with enough data for a paper. Engineering also spent a very long time blundering about, and was slow to gain confidence. Early steam boilers often exploded, even just for heating buildings. This gave rise to insurance companies, which, in turn, introduced standards and inspections for such things.



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07 Dec 2022, 6:37 pm

Regarding forms of bicycle, one can go right back to the 1700's and before, though these were wheeled wooden machines that one sat on and scooted with ones feet. These were considered to be superior in their day as a way to travel that was more efficient than walking and used less energy than running.
Bicycle technology was very slow to progress compared to what was being done the steam locomotive and railways or in some countries, road vehicles.Britian was slow in any advancements in self propelled road vehicles because we had a law back in those days that every road vehicle that was powered by mechanical (Or electrical etc) means had to have a man walking in front of it carrying a red flag (Think it was red) to warn horse riders and pedestrians that it was coming. No vehicle was allowed over 12mph (Though to be honest, having a man walking or running in front carrying a flag for the entire journey meant that few could pass that speed if they wated to!
France and other countries did not have such a law and they were able to take advantage of this and make some technical advancements that Britain had no incentive to make!
The steam locomotive was not subject to such rules (Though they did to be fair make some rules for safety reasons) so wad able to progress at a faster rate of technological advancements. So much so that certainly by the 1870's to 1880's we had lengthy express trains flying through the countryside at speeds sometimes in excess of 80mph, and in 1904 a loco (City of Truro from the Great Western Railway) touched and slightly exceeded 100mph. The railways in Britain had progrsssed at an alarming rate, and at one time we had so many railway lines that it was said that no where in mainland aBritain was further than five miles feom a railway of some description.
While our railways progressed, our roads were often still.mud strips with a central grass strip which was left for horses to walk on, so for many years it was completely pointless building a car for the UK roads that could be driven at over 40 to 50 mph, as where could one practically use it? The old cars had narrow tyres with a high ground clearance so the tyres could sink in the mud and touch solid ground underneath to grip with as the roadswdfesimply not suitable for wider tyred cars. (Anyone who knows what the UK mud is like and does mountain bike racing knows that in the clay type mud that one needs a narrow rear tyre but a wide front tyre, because one needs ths front tyre to avoid sinking into the mud as one could end up airborne flying over the bars if the front wheel digs in and stops, but if one tries to use a wide back tyre one jjust skids on top of the wet mud and gets very little grip, but if one uses a narrow rear tyre,ones tyre sinks below the surface of the wet mud and grips on solid material so one can carry on pedalling and making orogress through the mud. (Is why the early Landrovers used narrow tyres due to UK's muddy conditions and why they can even today negotiate themselves throughmuddy fields where todays more modern wide tyred 4x4's will be seen skating on top of the mud and sliding in directions they didn't intend to go! Other countries with different terrain need a different approach so wider tyres in a country that has dryer terrain will be more suitable.



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07 Dec 2022, 7:16 pm

Dear_one wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
We assume certain technologies arrived atcertain dates, and while in general it maybe correct and true, there are often these exceptions found which later which prove us wrong!


The mix gets extreme on the frontiers, where someone may be living with mostly stone-age technology, but also hires an aircraft, or owns a snowmobile.
"Damascus steel" is still exceptionally good for moderate temperature uses, and learning how it was made was just about the last thing we discovered about steel. (not to be confused with "make your own" versions on YouTube.) We only began to learn how to improve materials scientifically after experiments on glass, which got the researcher fired, but with enough data for a paper. Engineering also spent a very long time blundering about, and was slow to gain confidence. Early steam boilers often exploded, even just for heating buildings. This gave rise to insurance companies, which, in turn, introduced standards and inspections for such things.


Yes. I have heard of that and another example is the remains of Noahs Ark where samples of a bolt found were found to be made out of an alloy of titanium which even today they don't know how it was done!
Even if the remains of the ship found was not the Ark (Can honestly say that if it isn't the Ark then the mystery deepens even further as what other seaworthy vessel could be discovered in such an unlikely and impossible location, it is still just as amazing a discovefy to find technology that today we don't have a clue how it was done!)



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07 Dec 2022, 7:56 pm

For further reading on the history and development of technology, I highly recommend the books of J.E. Gordon. He is a superb writer, and was very involved in the research.



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07 Dec 2022, 8:45 pm

kitesandtrainsandcats wrote:
Elgee wrote:
But at some point, tracks can be too close

I'd say definitely at that point ...



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07 Dec 2022, 8:49 pm

Dear_one wrote:
For further reading on the history and development of technology, I highly recommend the books of J.E. Gordon. He is a superb writer, and was very involved in the research.


Thanks. If I come across one I will take a look.



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07 Dec 2022, 8:58 pm

Trains a bit closer - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1KkXDZ2kCk

My first year in Winnipeg, I'd gotten used to the grey slush all over by springtime. Then I went to meet a friend at the train, and was dazzled by the pure white snow on the undercarriage.



naturalplastic
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07 Dec 2022, 9:07 pm

auntblabby wrote:
kitesandtrainsandcats wrote:
Elgee wrote:
But at some point, tracks can be too close

I'd say definitely at that point ...



Damnit. You beat me to it! :D

I have the same song sung by a girl singer in my CD collection! Forget her name.



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07 Dec 2022, 9:17 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
Damnit. You beat me to it! :D I have the same song sung by a girl singer in my CD collection! Forget her name.

now THAT i'd love to hear, is it on youtube?



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07 Dec 2022, 9:52 pm

auntblabby wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Damnit. You beat me to it! :D I have the same song sung by a girl singer in my CD collection! Forget her name.

now THAT i'd love to hear, is it on youtube?



https://youtu.be/6QAuOF5gDNA

Yeah. It IS even funnier, for some reason, sung in a female voice. :D



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08 Dec 2022, 8:06 am

Loved the sound of distant trains , my city is a railway hub for my country . About 1 am a train goes by almost every night ..am over three miles from the closest track. Sometimes a whistle often. Times not. The low rumble sound
Took me alittle while for it to become soothing , As originally came from a earthquake zone. Same kinda rumble as a train often just before the quake hits. :oops: :roll: :D :D :D


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08 Dec 2022, 8:35 am

naturalplastic wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Damnit. You beat me to it! :D I have the same song sung by a girl singer in my CD collection! Forget her name.

now THAT i'd love to hear, is it on youtube?



https://youtu.be/6QAuOF5gDNA

Yeah. It IS even funnier, for some reason, sung in a female voice. :D

TY for introducing me to this new [to me] music :dj:



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08 Dec 2022, 8:40 am

My pleasure. :D



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08 Dec 2022, 8:42 am

Cute piece of Music… enjoyable … :D :D :)


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08 Dec 2022, 8:50 am

i first heard it on a radio program here called "music with moscowitz" :dj:



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08 Dec 2022, 8:53 am

Jakki wrote:
Loved the sound of distant trains , my city is a railway hub for my country . About 1 am a train goes by almost every night ..am over three miles from the closest track. Sometimes a whistle often. Times not. The low rumble sound
Took me alittle while for it to become soothing , As originally came from a earthquake zone. Same kinda rumble as a train often just before the quake hits. :oops: :roll: :D :D :D



https://youtu.be/sIo5x-q1GNo

The Brits love to put trains into their murder mystery books, and movies. But they never SING about trains the way North Americans do.