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naturalplastic
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08 Dec 2022, 9:00 am

auntblabby wrote:
i first heard it on a radio program here called "music with moscowitz" :dj:

Not familiar with that show.



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08 Dec 2022, 9:04 am

Wow.. thank you for that….often I get a soft spot in my heart when I hear some of Hank Williams music. :heart:


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naturalplastic
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08 Dec 2022, 9:09 am

Jakki wrote:
Wow.. thank you for that….often I get a soft spot in my heart when I hear some of Hank Williams music. :heart:


In the Sixties the Canadian govt. commissioned a certain folksinger to write a song commemorting the centennial of the railroad line that crossed the nation east-to-west (about the same time in the previous century that the US was building its cross continental railroad).

https://youtu.be/PXzauTuRG78

The same artist, Gordon Lightfoot, also kind of put the punctuation mark to end an era, with one line in THIS song: "you cant hop a jet plane like you can a freight train". Before that folk, country, and blues, songs, were about guys hopping freight trains. By 1964 it was the jet age, and you had to sing "I am leavin on a jet plane...". I like Peter, Paul, and Mary's version of Lightfoot's 'Early Morning Rain'.


https://youtu.be/0OCnHNk2Hac



ToughDiamond
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08 Dec 2022, 11:25 am

naturalplastic wrote:
The Brits love to put trains into their murder mystery books, and movies. But they never SING about trains the way North Americans do.

The British do sing about trains, but you're right that we don't do it in the same way:
https://invidious.slipfox.xyz/watch?v=zfHkZDrxkbc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfHkZDrxkbc



naturalplastic
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08 Dec 2022, 11:53 am

ToughDiamond wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
The Brits love to put trains into their murder mystery books, and movies. But they never SING about trains the way North Americans do.

The British do sing about trains, but you're right that we don't do it in the same way:
https://invidious.slipfox.xyz/watch?v=zfHkZDrxkbc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfHkZDrxkbc


Atleast she didnt suffer Charlie's fate! :lol:

https://youtu.be/Dh994JcEfkI



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08 Dec 2022, 12:15 pm

Brits make great train music without singing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX9muArmeFg Recorded live at the BBC. Clapton steals the show with his harmonica, but Baker is awfully busy with his brushes to set the mood.
I had a probably aspie friend who was a busking one-man-band and got his train imitation onto CBC, but I can't find that one. So far, I don't think anyone has done a diesel, though, nor the cars.
When I rode my bicycle over Donner Pass, I stopped at the top for the view, and noticed a train also getting close, so I waited a few minutes until I could race the engine. Of course, it still had to get the cars up to level, so I pulled out a decent lead, but then I had some miles of being slowly passed by freight cars clacking away, with their tempo slowly rising.



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08 Dec 2022, 12:46 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
Atleast she didnt suffer Charlie's fate! :lol:

https://youtu.be/Dh994JcEfkI

It's generally done by ticket in the UK, rather than paying on the train. Apparently the fines for being on a train without a ticket are rather steep:

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/ne ... 63447.html

What they don't say much about is that there are certain accepted circumstances and excuses for not having a ticket, which you can successfully use in court if you fight the fine. But it's a dangerous method if you don't know exactly how to do it.

Personally I don't understand how anybody ever manages to get on a train without a ticket. They usually have barriers, guards, and CCTV at the station, for both entering and leaving the platform area.



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08 Dec 2022, 1:03 pm

There was a Swede, I think, who was charged for riding on the frame under a passenger car. Then, a week later, he got another bill, as the conductor had remembered that he'd been riding a first-class car.
If you want to hop a freight, the Cadillac is the Jumbo Bulk Loader - a hopper car with bulging, curved sides. It has a triangular compartment at each end with easy access through a big round hole.



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08 Dec 2022, 1:09 pm

ToughDiamond wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Atleast she didnt suffer Charlie's fate! :lol:

https://youtu.be/Dh994JcEfkI

It's generally done by ticket in the UK, rather than paying on the train. Apparently the fines for being on a train without a ticket are rather steep:

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/ne ... 63447.html

What they don't say much about is that there are certain accepted circumstances and excuses for not having a ticket, which you can successfully use in court if you fight the fine. But it's a dangerous method if you don't know exactly how to do it.

Personally I don't understand how anybody ever manages to get on a train without a ticket. They usually have barriers, guards, and CCTV at the station, for both entering and leaving the platform area.


Most stations in the UK are unstaffed and one buys the ticket from the conductor on the train. Only in populated places like cities do they have means to buy tickets when at the station.



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08 Dec 2022, 1:17 pm

Dear_one wrote:
There was a Swede, I think, who was charged for riding on the frame under a passenger car. Then, a week later, he got another bill, as the conductor had remembered that he'd been riding a first-class car.
If you want to hop a freight, the Cadillac is the Jumbo Bulk Loader - a hopper car with bulging, curved sides. It has a triangular compartment at each end with easy access through a big round hole.


Never forget a driver who saw a kid clinging to the roof of a high speed train that was going the otjer way (Class 253 or 254 "Intercity 125". Now classed as class 43), and those things gave out so much diesel fumes the kid could hardly breathe let alone cling on!



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08 Dec 2022, 1:45 pm

Mountain Goat wrote:
Most stations in the UK are unstaffed and one buys the ticket from the conductor on the train. Only in populated places like cities do they have means to buy tickets when at the station.

Ah, that explains it, I'm a townie. It's been decades since I saw a rural station. In those days they sold tickets if I remember right. At Newton Abbot I told a member of staff that I wanted to go to (?) Penzance. "So do I," he replied, "it's a very nice place." I thought he was deliberately being awkward, but it soon became clear that he was just very laid back and friendly. Quite a shock to a man from a city where laid-back employees were almost unheard of.



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08 Dec 2022, 2:03 pm

Dear_one wrote:
but then I had some miles of being slowly passed by freight cars clacking away, with their tempo slowly rising.


That would have been a fun sensory experience. :D


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08 Dec 2022, 8:12 pm

Dear_one wrote:
Brits make great train music without singing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX9muArmeFg Recorded live at the BBC. Clapton steals the show with his harmonica, but Baker is awfully busy with his brushes to set the mood.
I had a probably aspie friend who was a busking one-man-band and got his train imitation onto CBC, but I can't find that one. So far, I don't think anyone has done a diesel, though, nor the cars.
When I rode my bicycle over Donner Pass, I stopped at the top for the view, and noticed a train also getting close, so I waited a few minutes until I could race the engine. Of course, it still had to get the cars up to level, so I pulled out a decent lead, but then I had some miles of being slowly passed by freight cars clacking away, with their tempo slowly rising.


Quite a ride….! Then the ongoing sounds of the Clickety Clack of the Rail cars as a background ongoing Sound.
Think it would feel Melodic as well as the sound too.
Just BTW : :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: who won the race ? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :wink:


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08 Dec 2022, 8:43 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
i first heard it on a radio program here called "music with moscowitz" :dj:

Not familiar with that show.

it was a northwest local version of dr. d. so cal back in the day had another similar program before dr. d. called pasadena pops potpourri. anyways, dr. d. seldom broadcast in my neck of the woods, washington state was not included in the westwood one radio network which was dr. d's network. so music with moscowitz was my mainly only exposure to the demented tunes including rusty draper's version of "in the middle of the house." the late [2006] robert boren was a retired school teacher who took on a second career as a dj named "madman moscowitz" in the 80s, he had a collection of over 20,000 recordings, many of which were novelties. the various stations that hosted his program gave him a wide degree of latitude in his programming and he'd sometimes play some raunchy stuff that wouldn't pass muster on westwood one. i have much of it on tape from back in the day.



naturalplastic
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08 Dec 2022, 9:10 pm

Dear_one wrote:
Brits make great train music without singing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX9muArmeFg Recorded live at the BBC. Clapton steals the show with his harmonica, but Baker is awfully busy with his brushes to set the mood.
.

Not "the Brits", but one British band (who are displaying their deep roots in American blues in that song) did a great simulation of the sound of train in that one song.

Trouble is...it competes with the dozens of great versions of the one American bluegrass warhorse "Orange Blossom Special" - a song with a similar sound simulation idea, but with a little more dramatic tension.





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09 Dec 2022, 12:24 am

This one's fairly pure British:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6mgBZmoqoU
As it's a 1920s style you have to wait quite a while before anybody starts singing.