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Sea Gull
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07 Oct 2012, 10:29 pm

Someone said, that eye-tracking would be the most precise AS diagnosis tool. He said that Aspies tend to avoid faces and eyes, but I've got no problem with looking at faces and eyes in the pictures. What do you think about it?

I think that it might be still not perfectly reliable, because it still would be hard to diagnose near ASD borderline.



antifeministfrills
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08 Oct 2012, 2:36 am

Where was this? I'm inclined to disagree. And there could be other reasons for avoiding eye contact.



Ilka
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08 Oct 2012, 7:28 am

I disagree? Both my husband and daughter have AS and they do not avoid eye contact. My daughter will only avoid eye contact when she does not know the person well. My husband never avoids eye contact.



realityasatoy
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08 Oct 2012, 11:01 am

If they use pictures that is totally unreliable. There is no reason to have anxiety over a picture (If the avoidance of eye contact is anxiety related in ASD) a picture can't react to you and you aren't really interacting with the picture. I think a real person would have to be used for an accurate result.



jetbuilder
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08 Oct 2012, 11:56 am

I was thinking about this a long time ago. I think there may be something to it. I've read about people doing studies that involve people on the spectrum and eye tracking and how it differs from NT's.

I'd definitely be interested in seeing if this type of study could be used as diagnostic tool.
I don't think it would/ could be a definitive test on it's own.[youtube]http://www.youtube.com
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYl_wDxanh4&NR=1&feature=endscreen[/youtube]


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Last edited by jetbuilder on 08 Oct 2012, 12:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Sylanor
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08 Oct 2012, 12:00 pm

I very much disagree with the possibility of this working. There are a million reasons someone doesn't like to look in another persons eyes.



outofplace
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08 Oct 2012, 3:11 pm

There are too many variables at play for this to work on everyone with an ASD. First off, it's not an actual person so the subject has no fear of the person behind the eyes they are reacting to reacting back. Second, some people on the milder end of the spectrum learn to deal with eye contact through socialization and desensitization, so it is not an accurate test for an older patient. Now it may work as one of a series of tests used to make a diagnosis, but I wouldn't trust it as the only test used for diagnosis.


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Last edited by outofplace on 08 Oct 2012, 11:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

muff
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08 Oct 2012, 8:17 pm

my eyes went right to the painting the second time =P

ive seen this movie and its actually quite interesting. i dont know if this is valid because obviously the characters in the movie are more important than the painting so why wouldnt viewers pay more attention to the characters?

also, the music they play over the clip is way creepy.



Beelzerius
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08 Oct 2012, 8:39 pm

Eye tracking...is not a reason. It is like saying I have aids only because you have a flu!
I want to finally clarify a thing:

Autism means that you have various, and really MANY other problems that are associated with it. If you can say yes to nearly all of them then you have a type of autism http://www.autism-pdd.net/checklist.html
Now what next? GO and get diagnosed, self diagnosis is not enough.



Tuttle
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08 Oct 2012, 10:13 pm

I looked at the painting behind the painting we were "supposed" to look at.



btbnnyr
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08 Oct 2012, 10:22 pm

I like those studies showing the NTs looking at back and forth between the people in the movies and the autistic people looking at some random object in the background. Like in the posted video a few posts up.

People are always getting annoyed with me when I am watching videos with them, because I am always pointing out something in the background for them to look at while they are focused on the story. I am like, "Look at that! That is so great!" referring to some set decor.



Mdyar
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09 Oct 2012, 5:42 am

Tuttle wrote:
I looked at the painting behind the painting we were "supposed" to look at.



I followed it to the right spot without any forethought, naturally.

15 or so years ago, when driving and stopping at a 4- way intersection, I would have significant trouble making eye contact with the other driver(s). This is something you have to do at times to read them to see if they see you. It seemed like a violation of space to make this. Funny thing is I do this fine today.

In my past I was asked by others if I had an abusive past due to a "short" time making eye contact. Not much of a problem today.



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09 Oct 2012, 5:49 am

Whilst different, sluggish pupils is supposedly an accurate predictor of ASDs [when all the other stuff is there].

My left pupil doesn't respond to light/darkness very well at all (it doesn't do much), so it's accurate in my case.