Page 1 of 1 [ 5 posts ] 

littlekitkat1
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 6 Mar 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 5

23 Mar 2013, 11:29 am

Yesterday, I got the answers I was looking for after over a month of testing by a wonderful doctor. I've always known something was off, and it was just starting to eat at me, and I needed answers. I don't meet enough of the criteria for an official AS diagnosis (or at least, he didn't officially give me the title of being an aspie) He did however, agree that I'm on the spectrum, and gave me a PDD–NOS diagnosis. I also have severe ADD, and I have OCD as well. In addition, I have dyscalculia.

He noticed during rigorous testing that I have trouble recognizing faces/telling faces apart, as well as others social cues. (This probably explains why a guy and I have been seeing each other off/on for almost a year but have never taken the official plunge because I don't understand when he's flirting with me. Luckily, he's been really nice about it and patient.) It explains why I think my stepmom is angry with me when she really isn't. It explains my trouble communicating with others sometimes, yet I'm a freelance writer and people enjoy my work.

It also explains my obsessions. I didn't even realize they were obsessions until I sat back and thought about it. I originally thought everyone obsessed like that.

I'm relieved, but I'm also afraid, and I'm wondering if I should tell the people I care about, including the man who is interested in me. I'm hopeful because this doctor still believes I can graduate college and also thinks I'm a good candidate for cognitive therapy.
This is a whole new world that I'm unfamiliar with, so I hope to get to know all of you here at Wrong Planet. Any advice would be welcome.



Cafeaulait
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2012
Age: 28
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,512
Location: Europe

23 Mar 2013, 11:51 am

littlekitkat1 wrote:
Yesterday, I got the answers I was looking for after over a month of testing by a wonderful doctor. I've always known something was off, and it was just starting to eat at me, and I needed answers. I don't meet enough of the criteria for an official AS diagnosis (or at least, he didn't officially give me the title of being an aspie) He did however, agree that I'm on the spectrum, and gave me a PDD–NOS diagnosis. I also have severe ADD, and I have OCD as well. In addition, I have dyscalculia.

He noticed during rigorous testing that I have trouble recognizing faces/telling faces apart, as well as others social cues. (This probably explains why a guy and I have been seeing each other off/on for almost a year but have never taken the official plunge because I don't understand when he's flirting with me. Luckily, he's been really nice about it and patient.) It explains why I think my stepmom is angry with me when she really isn't. It explains my trouble communicating with others sometimes, yet I'm a freelance writer and people enjoy my work.

It also explains my obsessions. I didn't even realize they were obsessions until I sat back and thought about it. I originally thought everyone obsessed like that.

I'm relieved, but I'm also afraid, and I'm wondering if I should tell the people I care about, including the man who is interested in me. I'm hopeful because this doctor still believes I can graduate college and also thinks I'm a good candidate for cognitive therapy.
This is a whole new world that I'm unfamiliar with, so I hope to get to know all of you here at Wrong Planet. Any advice would be welcome.


Hey!
So now you have an ASD diagnosis... you're life is not over ;)
There are many people on the forum here than can share their experiences with you, that have just been diagnosed.
I'm 21 myself and and in the trajectory of finding out right now 'what is wrong with me'. Having a conversation with the therapist next week.

How long have you and the boy been dating now?

Can I ask you what obsession do you have? And how many time do you spend on them? Curious!



littlekitkat1
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 6 Mar 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 5

23 Mar 2013, 12:20 pm

Quote:
Hey!
So now you have an ASD diagnosis... you're life is not over
There are many people on the forum here than can share their experiences with you, that have just been diagnosed.
I'm 21 myself and and in the trajectory of finding out right now 'what is wrong with me'. Having a conversation with the therapist next week.

How long have you and the boy been dating now?

Can I ask you what obsession do you have? And how many time do you spend on them? Curious!


Hi there! :) I've been dating him for about 9 months. He's very sweet. :heart: My obsessions do change over time, but for years I'd be obsessed with certain books, TV shows, movies and actors. I'd look up everything there is to know about certain actors/actresses and know every piece of trivia about them. Movies same thing. My dad used to make a game of it, randomly ask me when a movie was released and I'd tell him the date, without looking it up. Books I'd become so obsessed with that I'd even change the ending if I decided I didn't like it. I did this stuff for hours. I always did it so quietly that I don't think people have noticed it too much. It's starting to wind down now though. I've moved on to being obsessed with writing articles about a variety of subjects, which I guess helps, since it's part of my job. Oh and I'm obsessed with certain musicians. I guess I can finally confess this without sounding weird. Feels good.

Good luck with your own journey! Rooting for ya.



Urist
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 8 Feb 2013
Age: 23
Gender: Male
Posts: 231
Location: Scotland, United Kingdom

23 Mar 2013, 12:29 pm

It's important to remember that all a diagnosis does is give you a name for behaviours that you've always had anyway. You have been, and are going to be, the same person, as there is no actual treatment for autism.


_________________
Power corrupts. Knowledge is power. Study hard. Be evil.


goldfish21
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2013
Age: 37
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,150
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

23 Mar 2013, 1:01 pm

Of course you can finish college. Why wouldn't you be able to?

Many of us have, some ASD's (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) are Doctors, many are Engineers or Teachers/Professors. Virtually every great Scientist, Philosopher, Inventor, and so on has had at least a touch of ASD.

I completed 130.5 credits of schooling in two years. Granted, I graduated 11 years ago when I had no idea I was ASD. I suppose I had a slight mental advantage in the sense that I didnlt know I had ASD, so there were no doubts about college completion due to ASD. But let me tell ya, after learning all I have about ASD in the last 6 months and learning to manage/control my AS/ADHD/OCD & more better and better, and learning and improving coping mechanisms.. Life gets much better knowing. I WISH I could have known waaaay younger, as I would have had a lot less stress in school/work/life. Although there's no way to know I'd have learned all that I have and how to treat myself at a younger age, as the unique set of circumstances that set this learning all in motion couldn't have happened at any other time in my life than last Spring/Summer when it did. I find a sort of comfort in that, as then I can't blame myself for not figuring it out sooner. Annnd life goes on. 8)

You should tell others when you're comfortable doing so. Me, I would tell them vs plan to conceal it. Transparency w/ friends and family helps minimize frustrations w/ social things and communication while maximizing and understanding and support you're going to get. If these people care about you it'll be fine.

CBT - if you'd like to read about it/learn ahead of the game, I really got a lot out of "Feeling Good," by Dr. David Burns.

For AS books I've read "The complete guide to Asperger's Syndrome," by Dr. Tony Attwood. "Asperger's from the inside out," by Michael Carley (autobiography) and "Look me in the eyes," by John Robison. All were good, and I'd recommend them in that order. I didn't think I'd get much from others life stories considering I've lived my own AS life to date already, but as Attwood points out at the end of his book - there's a lot to learn from other AS stories as we can learn from their mistakes and not make them in the future, or learn a lot about ourselves as we realize we have similar traits and habits, and why.

Exercise is good. Meditation, yoga, whatever keeps you balanced.

Diet can be crucial for some. The most common food intolerances/sensitivities for AS/ADHD are salicylate acid sensitivity (fruits/veg/spices/plants), gluten (wheat/grains) intolerance, casein (dairy) intolerance. Then other things like artificial flavours/colours, preservatives, hydrolized vegetable proteins, corn, soy, msg - basically any processed junk food. Especially the first three; these foods can amplify symptoms, anxiety, depression, and wreak havoc on various neurological functions. Its possible that you can improve changing your diet. I know I have, and so have many others who've figured out which foods mess with them. Have a look into food allergies, elimination diets for testing etc if you're willing to try a restricted diet to see if it helps you. Some are open to trying this, others are too picky about their food and refuse to even consider it. Foolish if you find out any of these things are toxic to you and could live a better life w/o them.


_________________
No :heart: for supporting trump. Because doing so is deplorable.