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Do you think Asperger's affects music taste?
yes 61%  61%  [ 117 ]
no 39%  39%  [ 75 ]
Total votes : 192

Whatplanet
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14 Jan 2015, 7:13 pm

Interesting but is it because of their neurological make up or a psychological need to connect to a perceived standard of normality. I think music taste is probally largely psychological regardless of neurology.



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14 Jan 2015, 7:54 pm

I believe it's psychological/emotive, for the most part.

There might be times when alternative neurology might lend itself to "unusual" musical tastes--but I don't think musical taste is, in most cases, purely a function of neurology.

I don't find much difference between the musical tastes of people with ASDs and NT's if the ages of the individuals considered are similar (i.e., they are in the same "generation").



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14 Jan 2015, 8:18 pm

Sure we might research the hell out of bands and stuff we like, but no I don't think it influences what we like. Life experiences will influence what we like though. So Asperger's may cause us to have certain life experiences, which will then influence what we like.

I'm going to change that a little, hypersensitivity in one's ears may create certain preferences, as I have no interest in heavily base driven pieces.


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14 Jan 2015, 8:26 pm

I tend to like bass better than higher notes. I dislike extremely high notes.



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14 Jan 2015, 8:29 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I tend to like bass better than higher notes. I dislike extremely high notes.

When I say base, I suppose I should say I refer to the Bass cannon


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15 Jan 2015, 1:00 am

Certain popular songs by artists like Iggy Azalea, Magic!, Meghan Trainor, and others that people like I just find to be ear poison. Even Taylor Swift, who I used to like, I absolutely can't stand what she's putting out now. IMO, she's just become a sellout. Some of my likes on the other hand are more unusual. I often find myself drawn to a lot of soundtrack music, especially the ones with a dramatic choir, and several Broadway tracks from Aida, Cats, Phantom Of The Opera, and Wicked. I also have a fondness for opening and closing tracks from popular Animes like Attack On Titan, Dusk Maiden Of Amnesia, and Future Diary.



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15 Jan 2015, 7:01 am

I think general knowledge of music and musical experience affects taste more than neurology.

It depends on what you're used to.

If someone is used to eating homemade from-scratch Macaroni & Cheese, they're not going to like the boxed version much.

But, in my personal experience, I think my cluelessness growing up and being really out-of-touch with the world of "popular entertainment" was related to AS and did affect my musical tastes at least somewhat. I still am out-of-touch, and my kids keep me current (sort-of.)

I did a lot of roller-skating in 1984-1986. I am very familiar with popular music from that time because it was always played in the rink. I even like/d some of the songs. But, I would have never become familiar with them without the roller rink. Those songs did not help me define my overall taste in music, but I still get a good feeling when some of them come on the radio if I am in a store. I might even sing along.

I think the internet will be changing things more & more, as listeners have more control over what they listen to. The internet offers unlimited choices whereas, in comparison, radio stations have a limited selection based on what they think their listeners want to hear, or based on what the record companies are promoting. How often does the same exact song come on on the radio throughout the day. I don't even turn the radio on. It's much better to just listen to music on the internet. Kids these days are becoming familiar with music from before their time and from all over the world.

I think that's a good thing. :D



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16 Jan 2015, 12:26 am

Before there was the autism explanation there was New Wave to show me that my weirdness and fun could be compatible or as Wikipedia puts it
"According to music journalist Simon Reynolds, the music had a twitchy, agitated feel to it." "A nervous, nerdy persona was a common characteristic of new wave fans and acts such as Talking Heads, Devo and Elvis Costello. This took the forms of robotic or spastic dancing, jittery high-pitched vocals, and clothing fashions such as suits and big
glasses that hid the body"

Stim party begins at 2:50





Wrong Planet ongoing thread: let's post weird music


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16 Jan 2015, 1:54 am

I don't know about "weird", but I do find that I'm frequently drawn to overtly complex music, such as progressive rock, math rock, etc., stuff with lots of time changes, key changes, unconventional structure, etc. I find I get enveloped in it much more than typical 4/4 pop/rock music and I often love deconstructing lengthy songs and figuring out how they're structured.

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Before there was the autism explanation there was New Wave to show me that my weirdness and fun could be compatible


It should be noted that New Wave pioneers (and overall geniuses) David Byrne (Talking Heads) and Gary Numan are both diagnosed with Asperger's, yet their music was not as overtly "weird" as Devo or The B-52s. David Byrne had a really awkward, jerky stage presence and made a lot of strange yelping noises in his music, whereas Gary Numan was more quiet and withdrawn.



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16 Jan 2015, 10:15 am

nerdygirl wrote:
I think general knowledge of music and musical experience affects taste more than neurology.

It depends on what you're used to.

If someone is used to eating homemade from-scratch Macaroni & Cheese, they're not going to like the boxed version much.

But, in my personal experience, I think my cluelessness growing up and being really out-of-touch with the world of "popular entertainment" was related to AS and did affect my musical tastes at least somewhat. I still am out-of-touch, and my kids keep me current (sort-of.)

I did a lot of roller-skating in 1984-1986. I am very familiar with popular music from that time because it was always played in the rink. I even like/d some of the songs. But, I would have never become familiar with them without the roller rink. Those songs did not help me define my overall taste in music, but I still get a good feeling when some of them come on the radio if I am in a store. I might even sing along.

I think the internet will be changing things more & more, as listeners have more control over what they listen to. The internet offers unlimited choices whereas, in comparison, radio stations have a limited selection based on what they think their listeners want to hear, or based on what the record companies are promoting. How often does the same exact song come on on the radio throughout the day. I don't even turn the radio on. It's much better to just listen to music on the internet. Kids these days are becoming familiar with music from before their time and from all over the world.

I think that's a good thing. :D


Growing up in the 90s, I listened to a lot of the popular boy bands, rock bands, hip-hop groups and country artists of the decade going forward into present day, but, at the same time, my dad would play a lot of the music from when he was growing up like hard rock, heavy metal, hair metal, disco, R&B, classic country, and even pop from back then. So not only did I grow up with Backstreet Boys, Evanescence, Keith Urban, Miley Cyrus, Usher, Shania Twain, Linkin Park, and Rascal Flatts but I also became quite familiar with The Beatles, Judas Priest, Journey, U2, Heart, Lionel Richie, Whitney Houston, Def Leppard, Poison, Queen, Elton John, and many more. I'm pretty sure that the argument could even be made that growing up during the Disney Renaissance and watching the movies that came from Disney at the time gave me my love for Broadway musicals.



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16 Jan 2015, 11:01 am

I find that most people don't really like music. They think they do, but they don't. They often just like a certain type of music.

I listen to a very wide variety of music, but there are a few types that I can't stand at all -- notably rap/hip hop and anything related to it. Consequently, I'm not sure that I can be said to "like music".



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16 Jan 2015, 12:46 pm

eric76 wrote:
I find that most people don't really like music. They think they do, but they don't. They often just like a certain type of music.

I listen to a very wide variety of music, but there are a few types that I can't stand at all -- notably rap/hip hop and anything related to it. Consequently, I'm not sure that I can be said to "like music".


Well, I am a bona-fide music snob with the decades of musical training to earn that title. I also listen to an extremely wide amount of music from all time periods and across the world. I certainly CAN say that I "like music", even though I do not like certain types. :wink:



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16 Jan 2015, 11:52 pm

Skibz888 wrote:
I don't know about "weird", but I do find that I'm frequently drawn to overtly complex music, such as progressive rock, math rock, etc., stuff with lots of time changes, key changes, unconventional structure, etc. I find I get enveloped in it much more than typical 4/4 pop/rock music and I often love deconstructing lengthy songs and figuring out how they're structured.

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Before there was the autism explanation there was New Wave to show me that my weirdness and fun could be compatible


It should be noted that New Wave pioneers (and overall geniuses) David Byrne (Talking Heads) and Gary Numan are both diagnosed with Asperger's, yet their music was not as overtly "weird" as Devo or The B-52s. David Byrne had a really awkward, jerky stage presence and made a lot of strange yelping noises in his music, whereas Gary Numan was more quiet and withdrawn.


Numan's wife, a clinician who has a Aspie brother spotted the traits, He did an online test http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/23/books/review/david-byrnes-how-music-works.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 http://archive.bebo.com/BlogView.jsp?Me ... 3959484999http://hub.contactmusic.com/news/numan-convinced-he-has-aspergers_1060637

As for David Bryne
http://www.davidbyrne.com/archive/here_ ... ardian.php
"For three years, Byrne has been keeping a journal on his website, by turns revealing and thought-provoking, always with more questions than answers. "I was a peculiar young man," he wrote last April. "Borderline Asperger's, I guess."

"I'd only heard of Asperger's a few years ago," Byrne says now, "when a group out of Stanford proposed a spectrum that goes from autism to Asperger's to sort-of-good-at-math. I thought, 'Wow, I see a lot of myself in that.' Not that I was good at math, but I could be very focused on certain projects, and painfully shy - although I'd get up on stage, and then be incredibly shy the minute I stepped off.

"And it fits that at some point, after a couple of decades, it wears off." :roll: I thought that the bits of therapy I've had, and making an effort to be more social, really paid off, but it could just be that it wears off by itself"

Bolding mine and rolling eyes mine.

The above pretty much speaks for itself. But he and they helped me and other "different" people a lot at the time and that is what reaaly matters. n


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17 Jan 2015, 12:04 pm

I like spacy sounding music. My taste in music has been shaped by the fact that ever since I was young, I've felt like I'm from space.

I've also listened to Stars Of The Lid's Artificial Pine Arch Song everyday for about the past 5 years.


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17 Jan 2015, 5:14 pm

Hmm...I thought Numan and Byrne had both been diagnosed. I'd like to strongly believe that Byrne definitely has some form of it; if you've ever watched him in interviews, his traits and mannerisms and tones are very Aspie-like. Namely, they're almost identical to mine...in fact, the whole reason I discovered Talking Heads was because a teacher once said I reminded them of David Byrne in the "Once in a Lifetime" video. I would be more surprised if he didn't have some touch of AS.



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17 Jan 2015, 6:55 pm

I've listened to the same song at least twice a day (sometimes much more) for the last 5 years - Stars Of The Lid's - Artificial Pine Arch Song!

Never missed a day! That's Aspie!


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Your Aspie score: 151 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 60 of 200

Formally diagnosed in 2007.

Learn the simple joy of being satisfied with little, rather than always wanting more.