why do girls show less autistic symptoms than boys

Page 1 of 2 [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

ZombieBrideXD
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jan 2013
Age: 23
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,507
Location: Canada

28 Dec 2013, 6:29 pm

i just came back from a party put together by the Autism Recourse Center, it was great i had a lot of fun. i got along with all of them, mostly conner because we are both more verbally polite. everyone at the party were boys except me, which i had no problem with, when my dad came to pick me up, he said that i was WAY more adapted than them, and that i could almost pass as normal, i already knew this because i worked on my behaviour and communication skills a lot. why are some girls with autism, more adaptable to life than boys?


_________________
Obsessing over Sonic the Hedgehog since 2009
Diagnosed with Aspergers' syndrome in 2012.
Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder Level 1 severity without intellectual disability and without language impairment in 2015.

DA: http://mephilesdark123.deviantart.com

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 170 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 43 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Marcia
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Apr 2008
Age: 52
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,148

28 Dec 2013, 6:43 pm

If you're only going by an event at which you were the only girl, then it's not really a fair comparison. At your age, girls are often more socially adept than boys anyway, regardless of neurology.

I have met autistic men and women, of differing ages, and I would say that it depends very much on the individual, and the situation. I can think of one young woman in particular who definitely doesn't blend in, and is very obviously autistic. Other autistic women I've met are more adept in social settings, which may have something to do with being older and having more life experience. I've met young autistic men who aren't obviously "off", and others who are.



OlivG
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 25 Jun 2012
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 121

28 Dec 2013, 7:17 pm

The neurotypical women have generally better social skills than the neurotypical men, the cognitive profile of the neurotypical men is more systematic and more autistic than that of the neurotypical women. It would be no surprise to me if this applied to the autistics as well, that autistic men were in general "more autistic" than the autistic women.



ChameleonKeys
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 9 Sep 2013
Age: 43
Gender: Female
Posts: 115

28 Dec 2013, 7:26 pm

I definitely don't think it's wise to make a sweeping generalisation like that from one event with only one female there. Also, your Dad may be biased - I know my parents would be. ;)

As a child there were certain traits that I exhibited that were praised as good behaviour which if displayed by a boy would have been pathologised. For example, not speaking unless spoken to. I was very socially passive and this was considered 'nice', 'quiet', 'good girl' behaviour. If I had been a boy then that would have been seen as odd, undesirable and concerning. Unfortunately because the adults in my life at the time viewed me as good for not interacting they never addressed it. I think it's far more likely that girls are viewed more positively for traits which do not serve us positively than boys, where people recognise that those traits are a hinderance not a help.



Acedia
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 489

28 Dec 2013, 7:41 pm

I'm posting this particular article as this stood out to me.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... d-point-iq

Quote:
There is indeed a male-female brain difference relevant to this matter. Female brains have larger basal ganglia, which help the frontal lobe with executive functioning. As Giedd says: "Almost everything is more common in boys – autism, dyslexia, learning disabilities, ADHD, Tourette's … girls, by having larger basal ganglia, may be afforded some protection from these illnesses."


ChameleonKeys wrote:
For example, not speaking unless spoken to.


How about not replying when your name is called in the register? If you were diagnosed because you're polite and speak when spoken to, then isn't it your normal behaviour that has been pathologised and wrongly diagnosed?



buffinator
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Dec 2013
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 651
Location: Illinois

28 Dec 2013, 8:36 pm

girls are actually more likely to be severely disabled by autism. However for moderate cases it comes down to culture! The way that many parents raise girls is actually similar to the kinds of therapy used to treat ASD. Boys are raised differently and don't benefit as much from standard parenting.


_________________
AQ: 31
Your Aspie score: 135 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 63 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie


MjrMajorMajor
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Jan 2012
Gender: Female
Posts: 8,620

28 Dec 2013, 8:56 pm

ChameleonKeys wrote:
I definitely don't think it's wise to make a sweeping generalisation like that from one event with only one female there. Also, your Dad may be biased - I know my parents would be. ;)

As a child there were certain traits that I exhibited that were praised as good behaviour which if displayed by a boy would have been pathologised. For example, not speaking unless spoken to. I was very socially passive and this was considered 'nice', 'quiet', 'good girl' behaviour. If I had been a boy then that would have been seen as odd, undesirable and concerning. Unfortunately because the adults in my life at the time viewed me as good for not interacting they never addressed it. I think it's far more likely that girls are viewed more positively for traits which do not serve us positively than boys, where people recognise that those traits are a hinderance not a help.


This sums up my thoughts.



goldfish21
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2013
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,973
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada

28 Dec 2013, 9:11 pm

I think it's just the difference between girls and boys.

Boys tend to be a lot more extroverted, outgoing, "rambunctious," or any other number of adjectives to describe them being lively, active, always on the go etc.. and since they tend to be a lot louder & more physical, their behavioural traits come across much stronger.

Girls tend to typically be a lot quieter, more reserved, are more often introverted, participate in quieter pastimes etc & thus their autistic traits don't tend to shine so brightly and obviously to those observing them.

That's my take on it, anyways.


_________________
No :heart: for supporting trump. Because doing so is deplorable.


BuyerBeware
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Sep 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,471
Location: PA, USA

28 Dec 2013, 9:14 pm

buffinator wrote:
girls are actually more likely to be severely disabled by autism. However for moderate cases it comes down to culture! The way that many parents raise girls is actually similar to the kinds of therapy used to treat ASD. Boys are raised differently and don't benefit as much from standard parenting.


I would say this has a lot to do with it. Girls, at least Aspie girls,.are more likely to "pass." Aspie girls are also more likely to commit suicide, and to develop severe anxiety, crippling depression, social anxiety, agoraphobia, AvPD, et cetera et cetera.


_________________
"Alas, our dried voices when we whisper together are quiet and meaningless, as wind in dry grass, or rats' feet over broken glass in our dry cellar." --TS Eliot, "The Hollow Men"


buffinator
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Dec 2013
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 651
Location: Illinois

28 Dec 2013, 11:52 pm

goldfish21 wrote:
I think it's just the difference between girls and boys.

Boys tend to be a lot more extroverted, outgoing, "rambunctious," or any other number of adjectives to describe them being lively, active, always on the go etc.. and since they tend to be a lot louder & more physical, their behavioural traits come across much stronger.

Girls tend to typically be a lot quieter, more reserved, are more often introverted, participate in quieter pastimes etc & thus their autistic traits don't tend to shine so brightly and obviously to those observing them.

That's my take on it, anyways.


That is defiantly a culture thing rather than a natural thing. My experience has been the opposite. Girls are social and loud, boys are just kind of around for the ride with the exception of a few eccentrics / rich kids.


_________________
AQ: 31
Your Aspie score: 135 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 63 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie


ChameleonKeys
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 9 Sep 2013
Age: 43
Gender: Female
Posts: 115

29 Dec 2013, 2:42 am

Acedia wrote:
How about not replying when your name is called in the register? If you were diagnosed because you're polite and speak when spoken to, then isn't it your normal behaviour that has been pathologised and wrongly diagnosed?


You've completely missed my point! Boys are likely to be thought odd for not initiating interactions, but girls aren't. Saying that my diagnosis is wrong because you think somebody must have misinterpreted a childhood behaviour they didn't even notice as unusual (because I'm female) is ludicrous! That doesn't make any sense at all. I was not diagnosed as a child because Asperger's was not a even a possible diagnosis back then and my IQ was far too high to be given a classic Autism diagnosis in spite of my apparently being far more obviously Autistic than most of the people posting on here (if they describe themselves accurately). Anyone who knows me would laugh themselves silly at you questioning my diagnosis! Also, I'm Deaf: I will never respond to someone calling my name. Not initiating face to face social interaction ever, in my entire life, is not normal and is quite frankly the least of the massive list of Autistic traits I have, but it is a good example of why more mildly Autistic females than me are not diagnosed - Which is what we were discussing. :roll:



equestriatola
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 13 Aug 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 110,076
Location: Half of me is in the Washington state, the other Los Angeles.

29 Dec 2013, 2:43 am

Everyone's different. Although I tend to show Aspie symptoms more often than others....


_________________
LIONS-STAMPEDERS-ESKIMOS-ROUGHRIDERS-BLUE BOMBERS-TIGER-CATS-ARGONAUTS-REDBLACKS-ALOUETTES

The Canadian Football League - What We're Made Of

Feel free to talk to me, if you wish. :)

Every day is a gift- cherish it!

"A true, true friend helps a friend in need."


pensieve
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 8,204
Location: Sydney, Australia

29 Dec 2013, 5:23 am

Males get diagnosed more often with autism because girls present the symptoms differently and there's an incredible bias about diagnosing them. And we do seem more adaptable. I'm a systemizer despite being female though but I'm able to mimic social skills from other people.


_________________
My band photography blog - http://lostthroughthelens.wordpress.com/
My personal blog - http://helptheywantmetosocialise.wordpress.com/


pensieve
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Nov 2008
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 8,204
Location: Sydney, Australia

29 Dec 2013, 5:26 am

goldfish21 wrote:
I think it's just the difference between girls and boys.

Boys tend to be a lot more extroverted, outgoing, "rambunctious," or any other number of adjectives to describe them being lively, active, always on the go etc.. and since they tend to be a lot louder & more physical, their behavioural traits come across much stronger.

Girls tend to typically be a lot quieter, more reserved, are more often introverted, participate in quieter pastimes etc & thus their autistic traits don't tend to shine so brightly and obviously to those observing them.

That's my take on it, anyways.


I agree with this to a point, however my sister is more outgoing than me and I have known some passive autistic boys.


_________________
My band photography blog - http://lostthroughthelens.wordpress.com/
My personal blog - http://helptheywantmetosocialise.wordpress.com/


Acedia
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 26 Feb 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 489

29 Dec 2013, 7:53 am

ChameleonKeys wrote:
You've completely missed my point! Boys are likely to be thought odd for not initiating interactions, but girls aren't.


That's completely your perception, I've never heard or thought that. I always thought that boys could get away with being aloof and distant than girls because it's more expected from them.

Quote:
Saying that my diagnosis is wrong because you think somebody must have misinterpreted a childhood behaviour they didn't even notice as unusual (because I'm female) is ludicrous!


You mentioned that your socially passive behaviour was overlooked, while in boys it would be pathologized. When has being polite and speaking when you're spoken to a sign of autism?

Quote:
in spite of my apparently being far more obviously Autistic than most of the people posting on here


A bit presumptuous.

Quote:
Anyone who knows me would laugh themselves silly at you questioning my diagnosis!


That's if I was questioning your diagnosis and not your assertion that being passive and polite will be pathologized in boys as autism.

Quote:
Also, I'm Deaf: I will never respond to someone calling my name.


I'm not telepathic.



CaptainTrips222
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2009
Age: 39
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,100

29 Dec 2013, 9:41 am

Acedia wrote:
ChameleonKeys wrote:
You've completely missed my point! Boys are likely to be thought odd for not initiating interactions, but girls aren't.


That's completely your perception, I've never heard or thought that. I always thought that boys could get away with being aloof and distant than girls because it's more expected from them.



I pretty much agree with ChameleonKeys. It seems females that are quieter might come across as stuck up but not odd. Yet guys who aren't outgoing are not only seen as odd, but regarded with fear.