Page 2 of 2 [ 21 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

AdamAutistic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 May 2012
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,597
Location: Rhode Island

26 Feb 2014, 10:29 am

a kid asked my caregiver why i walked in circles.


_________________
Living Nintendo Database.
Mute Ameslan Signer.


JSBACHlover
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Oct 2013
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,282

26 Feb 2014, 3:48 pm

AdamAutistic wrote:
a kid asked my caregiver why i walked in circles.


:(



JSBACHlover
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Oct 2013
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,282

26 Feb 2014, 3:49 pm

EzraS wrote:
Probably the number one thing I overhear is "why doesn't he ever talk?"
Which is why I'm rarely if ever asked anything directly.


I wish you could talk more. You write wonderfully.



gretchyn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Sep 2012
Gender: Female
Posts: 504
Location: Middle Earth

26 Feb 2014, 8:36 pm

qawer wrote:
It hurts the most when kids ask out without any inhibitions.


It's quite the opposite for me. I find their straightforwardness and genuine, non-judgmental curiosity refreshing. What I hate is when adults judge you without knowing anything about you other than the abnormalities you display, and then treat you differently.

Children usually love me. I'm my natural self around them, I truly listen to their ideas without automatic dismissal, and I respect that they are people too, not just someone's doll. They are often very astute and once their curiosity is satisfied, they will then interact with you as an individual, not just some weird person with Tourette's and autism (for me).

Kids are amazing. The world would be a lot more tolerable if adults would ditch the social constructs and take a lesson from the kids.



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 62
Gender: Male
Posts: 19,975
Location: Long Island, New York

27 Feb 2014, 12:38 am

gretchyn wrote:
qawer wrote:
It hurts the most when kids ask out without any inhibitions.


It's quite the opposite for me. I find their straightforwardness and genuine, non-judgmental curiosity refreshing. What I hate is when adults judge you without knowing anything about you other than the abnormalities you display, and then treat you differently.

Children usually love me. I'm my natural self around them, I truly listen to their ideas without automatic dismissal, and I respect that they are people too, not just someone's doll. They are often very astute and once their curiosity is satisfied, they will then interact with you as an individual, not just some weird person with Tourette's and autism (for me).

Kids are amazing. The world would be a lot more tolerable if adults would ditch the social constructs and take a lesson from the kids.


Completely agree. And they are very literal also. Even if they are NT they have not yet developed the capacity for "Blurred Lines" type thinking.


_________________
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity

My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman


a_dork
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jan 2014
Gender: Female
Posts: 429
Location: petting octopuses in wonderland

27 Feb 2014, 5:35 am

According to several of my classmates, I made extremely weird faces. My younger brother told me that reading my facial expressions is almost impossible because they wouldn't match my actual emotions. For instance, there's an expression that I often make without realizing it: usually when I'm excited, but it apparently comes off as disgusted. I don't know whether it's because he has as much difficulty reading faces as I do (he's strongly suspected of having AS) or because I don't know how to align my emotions with my face (not sure if this really characteristic of people on the spectrum, I'm seeking a diagnosis at the moment).


_________________
“Oh - You're a very bad man!
Oh, no my dear. I'm a very good man. I'm just a very bad Wizard.”

― L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz