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Do you think in pictures?
Yes. 55%  55%  [ 30 ]
No. 24%  24%  [ 13 ]
Not sure. 22%  22%  [ 12 ]
Total votes : 55

kamiyu910
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19 Oct 2014, 10:28 pm

I think in a mixture of emotions, auditory, and visual, and depending on the subject, smell... My senses are really sensitive and I love remembering everything about something, even the negatives. Like if you ask me to think of a mulberry tree, I'll think of a specific tree and picture it in my head, hear how it sounds in the wind and how it smells.
I don't know what it's called to think in feelings though.


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Dear_one
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20 Oct 2014, 12:53 am

I think in words most of the time, but have a pretty easy time working out mechanical designs in my head. I use sketches to reduce the memory load and clarify some things, but I can also do advanced operations like finding CG, estimating deflections and strength, and dynamic responses in my head, with or without a sketch.

Feynman thought that he always thought in words, until someone asked him "You know the shape of a crankshaft?" and then asked what words came to mind..



DevilKisses
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20 Oct 2014, 1:23 am

Dear_one wrote:
I think in words most of the time, but have a pretty easy time working out mechanical designs in my head. I use sketches to reduce the memory load and clarify some things, but I can also do advanced operations like finding CG, estimating deflections and strength, and dynamic responses in my head, with or without a sketch.

Feynman thought that he always thought in words, until someone asked him "You know the shape of a crankshaft?" and then asked what words came to mind..

I can think of the mechanics of things as well. I often create crafts and test out ideas in my head. Even though the images are low quality and I do poorly when I'm tested.


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20 Oct 2014, 1:47 am

Tesla could design a machine in his head, run it, and then tear it down to check for wear. A lot of engineering is done with quick estimates that only have to be within 10% or so.



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20 Oct 2014, 3:37 pm

I never do but I have a low vision disorder & a visual processing disorder so I'm not a visual person.


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animalcrackers
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20 Oct 2014, 7:17 pm

L_Holmes wrote:
But what I'm really wondering about is that she explains that there are likely two types of visual thinkers: object and spatial. Object thinkers are like her, they see vivid imagery and picture things easily, and spatial thinkers see patterns in things, but do not visualize pictures in the same way, they see things in a more mathematical and literal way. I am definitely a more mathematical thinker, and I am much better at seeing patterns than I am at seeing imagery.

Spatial thinkers are also supposedly much better at mentally manipulating objects, like seeing what a paper looks like after folding it a certain way, or rotating and moving 3D objects in space etc. But I am not good at that, at all. It's like I forget what the original object looks like as soon as I try to move it in my mind, even if I'm staring right at it. I have to concentrate VERY hard to do it, and I still only get some of those questions right. One online IQ test I took told me that my spatial reasoning was much lower than average (it was called the Rutherford IQ test). But maybe that's just because I have poor working memory, I can't remember the image long enough to be able to rotate or move it from it's original position.


There are also visual-spatial thinkers -- the combination of both object-imagery and spatial thought. I have the combination. For me spatial thought is less about mathematics and more....well it's kind of like having a 3-D grid in my mind, but formless (although, I literally see a 3-D grid when I think about a 3-D grid -- black space with silver lines running through it, dividing it into cubes of black space).


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ImAnAspie
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21 Oct 2014, 1:31 am

I think in pictures. If I'm trying to recall an event, I get a picture/pictures in my mind as if I'm viewing the event from above (like a snapshot). Once I get the picture, suddenly everything about that time comes flooding back to me (including all of the irrelevant info which I have a hard time separating from the relevant facts when explaining the event to another.)

I am also able to manipulate images in my mind.


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21 Oct 2014, 3:56 am

My thoughts are like short video clips, and they are very vivid.
I can easily manipulate familiar objects in my mind (rotate, move, modify, build, disassemble, etc).



Jensen
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21 Oct 2014, 6:32 am

I was wowed by Grandins descriptions of her thought processes. I do the same, sadly not at her level, but the same at a high degree.
I can see objects taking form and work, when I construct something, - and then I do the measuring. I always called it "having a good craftsman logic".
So, I am a spatial thinker.
By expressions like "at the end of the rainbow" or "open the door to new things", I do see it literally, even though I know it is an idiom and use it as such myself.
That is just being concrete, I guess.


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21 Oct 2014, 6:56 am

I'm not sure what "thinking in pictures" means. If for example I am thinking about anything - let's say I am rehearsing a conversation with my boss - or planning to meet up with an old friend - I do see them in my minds eye and do imagine what such a conversation would look like as well as sound like. But, I assume everyone does that. So, I'm a little confused by what someone means by "thinking in pictures."


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21 Oct 2014, 7:09 am

r2d2 wrote:
I'm not sure what "thinking in pictures" means. If for example I am thinking about anything - let's say I am rehearsing a conversation with my boss - or planning to meet up with an old friend - I do see them in my minds eye and do imagine what such a conversation would look like as well as sound like. But, I assume everyone does that. So, I'm a little confused by what someone means by "thinking in pictures."


It's not projecting and visualizing what's going to happen.

It's recalling events that have happened in the past, only you recall them either as video as some do or like snapshots like I do.

They can be vivid like mine and they allow me to recall the entire event as it happened when I picture the scene/s in my mind. It seems to be, the longer the occasion I'm recalling, the more 'stills' I have of it. I even recall all of the irrelevant details associated with the event. E V E R Y T H I N G ! ! !


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ImAnAspie
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21 Oct 2014, 7:14 am

Being an Aspie DOES really have some fantastic trade-offs! :)


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21 Oct 2014, 7:30 am

Yes, I tend to think in pictures.


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21 Oct 2014, 12:39 pm

Yes - I'm a visual-spatial thinker. It's why I became an engineer. Was top of my class in engineering drafting.


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kamiyu910
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21 Oct 2014, 1:56 pm

Looking around on yahoo answers, this person posed an interesting point with thinking:

Quote:
"A similar thing happens when reading. I asked a friend, who is an opera singer, if she was going to take some good books to read on a long trip by train to Italy. She said, no, I am going to take a lot of sheet music. I can't read sheet music, so I wondered: You READ it? How does that work? Do you sort of "hear" the music you are reading? She: Yes of course, just like you hear a voice in your mind speaking when reading language. HUH???? I never "hear" a voice speaking when I am reading. That would slow down my reading to a snail pace.. I only "hear" what I am reading when puzzled, like when reading text lingo I am not familiar with: w8, for instance. "


I find it interesting that she thinks it would slow down her reading to a snail pace to "hear" the voice. I can read really quickly but I hear the voice, and feel what's going on as I read. Do people really get slowed down by "hearing" things in their thoughts? For me it's like a video, or something. I still don't know how to describe how I think.


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22 Oct 2014, 8:15 am

I do a few types of thinking. Auditory thinking? Check. Most of my thoughts have a running monolog to go with them. Visual thinking? I can certainly relate to that spatial type of visual thinking. I think in pictures a bit but the pictures come out really blurry I can never remember exactly what something looks like but I do a lot of spatial thinking where I move things around in my head to see how they fit and don't even worry about what they look like.

But when I picture people, things and places they come out blurry (I still do it a lot anyway). Not like when I try to remember what something sounds like where I can hear it in my head very clearly. Sometimes if I hear someone talk and I'm not listening, if I don't understand the words as they say them due to me not paying attention, I can reconstruct the meaning of their words by playing back the sound in my head so I can listen to the words again, even though I had no understanding of the words the first time. What would you call that? Phonographic memory?

Also I do a bit of kinesthetic thinking. Some my skills are just from muscle memory without much understanding. Sometimes I can play a piano piece from muscle memory without any conscious recollection of which notes where in it. Maybe I'm like that with spelling too. I can most words right most of the time if I'm writing or typing but if you ask me how to spell a word, if you ask me to say what the letters in it are, I'll have no idea unless I'm writing it.

I'm a bit like that with navigation too. I can find my way from maps or landmarks but I'm really bad at following written or spoken directions. I hate it when I ask for someone's address and instead of telling me their address they give me directions to their house starting from a place I've never heard off. I only want their address so I can look it up on my smartphone or the PC or the street directory (even before smartphones I could spatially memorize the way if I looked at the map before I left home but understanding spoken directions is near impossible for me (even with a sometimes phonographic memory, just because I remember what someone said, that doesn't mean I understand it, quite the opposite, phonographic memory is more like the sound of words stripped of their meaning).


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