Jerry Seinfeld thinks he is on the spectrum

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dianthus
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10 Nov 2014, 8:23 pm

gamerdad wrote:
I think it's a mistake to assume that people in the entertainment line of work are as socially competent as they appear on screen or stage. There's a big difference between reciting a rehearsed script and functioning in a real social environment. Someone on the spectrum could easily be successful at the former, but terrible at the latter.


I agree. In fact working off a script is almost the perfect type of work environment for some of us. It would be for me.



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13 Nov 2014, 2:46 pm

Sometimes, I wonder how true Jerry Seinfeld's Asperger's really is. Did he get a diagnosis from a certified doctor or did he look up stuff on the internet? That's what raises my suspicions about this report.



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13 Nov 2014, 5:46 pm

I'm sure he looks up symptoms on Wikipedia than mimics them



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13 Nov 2014, 6:09 pm

Seems like it'd be immaterial whether he has it or not from a practical standpoint.



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13 Nov 2014, 6:53 pm

cyberdad wrote:
I think Jerry Seinfeld has OCD based on his character and some of his habits during interviews, that probably explains it...


Yes, I agree. I believe he is a germaphobe but as far as being on the spectrum, not so sure about that. He seems far too social.


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13 Nov 2014, 6:57 pm

It's possible Seinfeld is not autistic, per se---rather, he could be within the Broad Autism Phenotype.

I happen to think that Seinfeld had a desire to "de-mystify" autism. It's possible he has a friend with autism, and that he learned a lot from this person. Or he might even have it himself (or thinks he has it).



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13 Nov 2014, 8:16 pm

gamerdad wrote:
MadHatterMatador wrote:
Toy_Soldier wrote:
Not impossible, but being a professional performer isn't something I associate with ASD. Or at least its very rare.


Yeah, or it's very mild. I feel like there needs to be more levels than just three. I haven't been diagnosed since the publication of the new DSM, but I imagine I would be level one, yet it feels like so many of these sort of people like Seinfeld, if they are on the spectrum, are a whole hell of a lot more socially competent and functional than I am. I guess that's what I don't like about all of these self-diagnoses, because I feel like it kind of trivializes my situation. I guess that's probably more of an issue with me though.

I think it's a mistake to assume that people in the entertainment line of work are as socially competent as they appear on screen or stage. There's a big difference between reciting a rehearsed script and functioning in a real social environment. Someone on the spectrum could easily be successful at the former, but terrible at the latter.


This is true. He's probably nothing like tv Jerry, I mean think about it - that was a verrrrrry exaggerated character. As is Larry David's on Curb. From what I know of both of them in real life (which isn't much), they could both be on the spectrum, but they could also not be and I'm not sure it really matters. I find the problems that I have from my (self diagnosed) Autism, come from my actions or lack thereof. I can't imagine how Jerry Seinfeld having Autism would help me with that.



kraftiekortie
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13 Nov 2014, 8:23 pm

I think Seinfeld saying he's on the Spectrum will "legitimize" autism.

It will get people away from the "Rain Man" image of autism.



wozeree
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13 Nov 2014, 8:36 pm

I get what you are saying, like people won't go OOOH AUTSIM, HE'S GOING TO KILL SOMEONE. I KNOW IT"S OK BECAUSE JERRY SEINFELD HAD IT SO IT HAS TO BE! :D

But what I'm saying is that no matter how many celebrities end up having it, if we say something we're "Not supposed to say," or behave awkwardly or want to slug someone because they are making weird noises when they eat, or trip over our own feet or whatever the things are that we do, we still have to deal with that in life. There's not going to be a Jerry Seinfeld free pass.

It's not like people finding out they can't get AIDS by hugging someone, therefore the problem of being near them goes away. JErry Seinfeld having Autism would not make our problems go away. I guess I'm just saying there are more proactive things to do in life than hope that Jerry Seinfeld has it. (I hope that doesn't sound argumentative or mean, it's just what I'm thinking).



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13 Nov 2014, 8:40 pm

I guess I should have said "Seinfield's disclosure would 'legitimize autism'....to a certain extent"--that's probably more correct, anyway.

Nope...Autism is definitely not in the mainstream. There's still a considerable stigma attached to it.

However, I believe that it is possible that this "disclosure" might, eventually, clear a path towards a greater understanding of autism amongst the general public.



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13 Nov 2014, 8:43 pm

I think you are a hopeless optimist! :lol:



kraftiekortie
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13 Nov 2014, 8:45 pm

I just have a gut feeling.

However, it should be noted that "intuition" is not one of my strong suits LOL



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13 Nov 2014, 8:57 pm

Hopefully it brings some positive awareness to the condition. Whether or not he gets diagnosed is his business, the effect this story has on people's view is the main issue



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13 Nov 2014, 10:57 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
It will get people away from the "Rain Man" image of autism.


Rain Man is fine (the fictional representation).

Back in the day, he was generally the highest functioning that could be labeled with autism. He still can be called autistic.

I have no idea if Jerry Seinfeld can be called such, as I've never seen him outside of his popular television show. His TV character didn't display it (though some other characters in the show did display bits and pieces, like with that one female who always wore the same clothes or that man who had odd eye contact).

So, from the viewpoint of an accurate depiction, Rain Man is the one you'd go with for general and moderate autism. There's plenty for severe and mild out there too.



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14 Nov 2014, 3:54 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I think Seinfeld saying he's on the Spectrum will "legitimize" autism.

It will get people away from the "Rain Man" image of autism.


Not to mention the Adam Lanza version of Aspergers? BTW Kim Peek (the real rainman) never had autism, his two brain hemispheres were not connected. Brain imaging study (MRI) of Peek's brain revealed an absence of the corpus callosum, the anterior commissure and the hippocampal commissure, the three main parts of the neurological system that transfer information between the right and the left hemispheres of the brain.

Hollywood never lets facts get in the way of a good drama...