Are Autistic people naturally more sensitive then NT's?

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AspieBoiLOL1
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20 Jun 2017, 9:00 pm

I'd like to hear your input, it seems that way since many people with AS/autism suffer from sensory issues. They also seem to take things really hard, and even a minor insult sticks with them for weeks, even years. Is this why they prefer spending time alone?



Joe90
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21 Jun 2017, 4:31 am

I'm sensitive, and I hate it when people tell me not to be. I know they mean well but I can't help it. I don't like nastiness.


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21 Jun 2017, 4:33 am

I've always been sensitive over my intellect and weight. But I feel tremendously low when I completely abstain from junk food.


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21 Jun 2017, 7:14 am

Yes.

Except in my case, it's like a zigzag case of a lifetime. :lol:

Sensory seeker at childhood, and a bit of a sore loser. Too unaware and too carefree. Avoids suffering, but would rather want to left alone or included as I pleased.
Sensory avoidant at teenage years, and an emotional fragile flower. :roll: Too aware and too worried. Suffered too much that I locked myself at home for years.
Now, quite sensory balanced, and quite emotionally balanced. Aware enough and had yet to truly balance life itself. Could care less, and suffers too little. I could take it -- being alone or not. I prefer being alone simply because I like it.

My "sensitivity input and sensitivity" didn't changed much. What changed is that how my mind, my heart, and my body takes the input. :|
And, distinguish between "needs" and "wants" yet I don't like having too much of either. :twisted:


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Kiprobalhato
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21 Jun 2017, 2:36 pm

physically, i would say they are.


but no one group is immune to brooding, grudge holding, ruminating......argh


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21 Jun 2017, 2:40 pm

AspieBoiLOL1 wrote:
I'd like to hear your input, it seems that way since many people with AS/autism suffer from sensory issues. They also seem to take things really hard, and even a minor insult sticks with them for weeks, even years. Is this why they prefer spending time alone?


I don't think the sensory sensitivity is directly connected with emotional hypersensitivity, so much as it is the result of those natural feelings of alienation and rejection one feels from being unable to fit in socially. We already tend to feel we don't really belong anywhere with normal people, so it's easy to feel crushed over the merest slight or sign of rejection.

When you already feel that nobody really likes you, or even wants to get to know you, it hurts twice as much when something happens to prove you right. :cry:


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