The neurodiverse perspective of theory of mind

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underwater
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11 Mar 2020, 6:00 am

This particular topic actually discussed a question I was very concerned with, but haven't seen a lot of good discussions about. I particularly loved the article one of the early posters linked to.


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Dear_one
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11 Mar 2020, 8:07 am

Around the time that I missed this thread, I was telling my counsellor "I've always had a strong Theory of Mind, but it was WRONG!" I had assumed that IQ and EQ were linked, so I'd expect socially active people to have no trouble with physics. I thought that they only complained about trouble with math to indulge laziness, and were lying again. I never took people's moods into account; that would have felt like being very sneaky.



blazingstar
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11 Mar 2020, 4:37 pm

I'm glad it was bumped. New information for me and new things to think about.


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B19
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11 Mar 2020, 5:31 pm

Me too, Blazing Star, it has showed from my posts throughout the lifespan of this very important topic how my own views have expanded.



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26 Jun 2020, 1:41 pm

1. When you read a story, do you have difficulty or abilities in being in the shoes of the character? (as a kid and adult?)
I don't have trouble with that now and I don't remember any trouble with it when I was a child. The stories I was exposed to must have been full of deceived characters and differing perspectives, but my comprehension was as good as that of anybody in my age group, if not better. The only trouble I have in being in a character's shoes these days is when I can't relate to the character and therefore have trouble focussing on the thing, because it bores me.
2. When you read a story that shifts from one scene to another scene, is it difficult for you to keep track? Why do you think so? (as a kid and adult)
Yes, to a degree. Seems to be down to a short-term memory problem.
3. As a child, was it difficult for you to understand when to use "I" and when to use "you" when talking?
No, never, as far as I can remember.
4. As a child or adult, did you or do you have trouble figuring out when people are talking about something that is happening NOW, happened in the past or will happen in the future?

No, as long as they expressed it in the right tense. I might once have had trouble with the way people sometimes use the present tense for dramatic effect when they're talking about the past, or the way the ancient prophets use present tense to talk about the future. But that would have been simple unfamiliarity with deviation from standard English syntax, and a certain amount of aversion to change and to irrational language.