Page 3 of 8 [ 117 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 8  Next

slw1990
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Jan 2014
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,406

25 Aug 2016, 9:54 pm

I didn't start cooking until I was 22. I just cook simple things like rice and beans, spaghetti and scrambled eggs



UnturnedStone
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 21 Apr 2015
Age: 34
Posts: 325
Location: Australia

25 Aug 2016, 9:58 pm

I can cook, some things. (easy)

Homemade Pizza, Ribs, Burgers, tacos / burritos.

That is about all...

I have this kinda thing about me, that if i'm not interested in something I can't learn it / do it.
The same applies to cooking, if I am not passionate about what I'm making it is going to be a disaster.
But if it is one of my favorite foods, then I am usually able to pull it off and I am complimented on my food.



GreenRanger06
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 14 Aug 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 18
Location: U.S

25 Aug 2016, 10:15 pm

I can cook in the microwave or the oven if needed. I cannot cook on a stove.



PuzzlePieces1
Raven
Raven

Joined: 16 Aug 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 124

25 Aug 2016, 11:37 pm

I recently got really into cooking because I realized that if I found good recipes and followed them precisely I could make food that was just as good or better than what I could buy at a restaurant for a fraction of the cost. For example, I got a used bread machine off Craigslist to make pizza dough and now I make pizzas at home for about 1/6 of the cost of buying one at the pizzeria on the corner.

The real trick to cooking well is learning how to use spices at the appropriate times and in the correct measurements. My wife raves about my cooking now.

I recommend a book called "Cooking for Geeks" which explains cooking in a very logical, scientific way that I found appealing. Cooking can be a lot of fun if you can develop an interest in it.



TheSilentOne
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Aug 2015
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,820
Location: Torchwood Three

26 Aug 2016, 8:41 am

I can't really cook at all. I can make really simple stuff only, like ramen noodles and macaroni and cheese.
Surprisingly though, I can actually bake pretty well. I can make all sorts of cookies and pies.


_________________
"Have you never seen something so mad, so extraordinary... That just for one second, you think that there might be more out there?" -Gwen Cooper, Torchwood


piiigs
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 28 May 2015
Age: 33
Posts: 43
Location: Norway

27 Aug 2016, 2:09 am

I used to work in a kitchen. So yes I can cook few things. But I hate cooking. I would eat out everyday if I could...



0regonGuy
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Apr 2015
Posts: 658
Location: Oregon Coast

27 Aug 2016, 5:13 am

cricketman123 wrote:
I am not great at cooking and i think thats my Autisim. It makes me upset i can't really cook a propper meal and only stick something in the microwave.

Is anyone else like this


I can boil pasta (then I add bottled spaghetti sauce, and frozen meatballs), and I can steam my broccoli. Other then that everything else is microwaved frozen dinners, or reheated take out food.

The reasons for that are 1. I just can't cook that well. Anything that I cook myself will probably not taste as good as a microwaved frozen dinner. 2. The clean up is just not worth it. Cooking and cleaning up from it is just too much work.


_________________
Autism Social Forum
A place for autistic people to discuss their interests.


BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 56
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,970

27 Aug 2016, 1:10 pm

http://www.independent.co.uk/student/st ... 39170.html

I would recommend starting with eggs or brownies.



ToughDiamond
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Age: 66
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,395

27 Aug 2016, 7:33 pm

To some extent I can cook. What holds me back is the challenge of synchronizing several saucepans and an oven - the dreaded multi-tasking. Superficially it doesn't seem very different to the job I used to do - science - but the difference is that with science everything is precisely calculated and predicted, and the incubators and time / temperature controls are much more accurate. So are the "recipes" - precise protocols that specify exactly what to do. With cooking, a lot of things are pretty imprecise, and that fazes me because I never know what kind of tolerances are acceptable. I try to get things too accurate, too perfect, and in doing so I leave the path of conventional cookery, which seems full of intuitive guesswork.

Somehow I muddle through using a compromise between scientific precision and winging it, but it can get pretty stressful, especially if time is limited. If I get to cook the same meal a few times, under the same conditions, I can get quite good at it and the stress goes away.

Mostly I live on salads, bread (home-baked), simple "just add hot water" powdered soup, scrambled eggs, and mashed potato. Those are all simple enough for me to prepare and I rarely feel the need to eat anything more complicated. I really don't know why anybody bothers with more complicated cookery, unless they've got some spare time and want to try their hand at something a little more challenging.



B19
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,339
Location: New Zealand

27 Aug 2016, 7:43 pm

Cook in one pan recipes were made for you, TD! There are lots of varieties. The easiest for a non-cook might be a simple risotto, (I'm happy to post fairly foolproof instructions if anyone wants the recipe) or a stirfry (ditto). Stirfrys are a bit harder to get just right, though (like life!) you learn a lot by trial and error.

Some non-cooks start with microwave cooking because it is fast and easy. One tip: If you want to bake a whole potato in the microwave, prick it several times with a fork before cooking, otherwise they explode; if you forget, you will only forget once given the mess to clean up. :x



Fern
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2011
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 934

27 Aug 2016, 8:04 pm

I am a cooking anarchist. It drives anyone who lives with me crazy.

I don't time anything in the oven (I HATE the sound of alarms, scares me). I just smell when it's done and take it out when it smells right (much more accurate if you ask me, since ovens differ). I don't measure things according to recipees. It's more fin to me to see how flexible a recipee is by altering things this way and that. I like looking at what random ingreedients I have, or what looks fresh, and going from there. I don't like planning and shoping with a list (I always miss something).

Tonight's dinner was a veggie & tofu stir fry over jasmine rice, followed by vanilla ice cream topped with blueberry/blackberry/roasted walnut sangria compote.


_________________
This is me.


BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 56
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,970

27 Aug 2016, 8:38 pm

I have a automatic rice cooker that keeps the cooked rice warm until I'm ready to eat it.
These days I'll often cook one thing at a time and eat it as I cook it so I don't have to multi-task. 8O

I used to go by timers--now I go by smell and a thermometer.



Drawyer
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 May 2015
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,861
Location: Away

27 Aug 2016, 10:31 pm

I can cook. Family members refuse to eat what I cook.


_________________
"Embrace the glorious mess that you are."


auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 89,085
Location: the island of defective toy santas

27 Aug 2016, 10:32 pm

I burn water and scorch air. :oops: the microwave oven is my friend :) I get lotsa those precooked brown rice packages that nuke in 3 minutes, and pour a can of soup over them and call it a meal. I make myself eat rabbitfood [salad] 4 times a week, even though i'm sick to death of it and have to pry open my mouth to get the spoon in. :eew:



Dox47
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Jan 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 10,044
Location: Seattle

27 Aug 2016, 11:54 pm

the_phoenix wrote:
... you need a much higher temperature for pork or you risk illness (425 or 450 degrees or something, I'd have to google it to be sure).


Actually, it's the final internal temperature that matters, not the cooking temperature, and pork only needs to cook to 137 degrees to be safe. I regularly cook it sous vide in a 135 degree water bath and finish it on the grill or in a saute pan, and no one has died yet.

Incidentally, for people who hate to multi-task but want to cook, a sous vide machine can be had for about $150 these days, and is pretty much foolproof and requires no skill at all to use, and turns out excellent results.


_________________
Murum Aries Attigit