The Dawn of Autistic Space - Excerpt from NeuroTribes

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erika luzia princess red
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Joined: 22 Jan 2018
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Posts: 4
Location: Brasil

04 Feb 2018, 3:47 pm

As vezes ser autista é como não ser um ser humano e por mais que não tenha lido o livro eu agradeço por nos defender.
Thanks.
Sometimes being autistic is like not being a human being and even though you have not read the book I thank you for defending us.
Thanks


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Pérola Luzz Princess red


AuntieMatter
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Location: Ireland

03 May 2018, 1:46 pm

I just speed-read this last week, and referenced it heavily in a paper I was writing (about Vulcan moral psychology and the dehumanisation of Aspies... long story). Looking forward to rereading it slowly.
I found the sections on the historical treatment of autists to be pretty upsetting. Much of it I didn't know. Other sections were empowering.
Thanks Steve.



AuntieMatter
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Joined: 9 Oct 2015
Age: 37
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Posts: 14
Location: Ireland

03 May 2018, 2:04 pm

Hyperborean wrote:
alex wrote:
I think most communities are made up of individuals with some conflicting beliefs. For instance, Wrong Planet has a community made up of a very diverse group of people who do share many similarities.


Yes, I agree. But the differences of opinion within the neurodiversity movement are quite extreme and often destructive, which makes it difficult for it to act as a cohesive community IRL for people with autism and other conditions. But as I said, maybe young people with AS will change that.


As there have been a few comparisons, it's worth noting that the LGBTQ movement has always featured internal conflict, disagreement, schism, vitriol, and internal discrimination. No successful movement is free from internal conflict. The internal conflict is important. It's part of the process - a means of identifying issues and omissions, if nothing else.

I'm queer and I'm autistic, and I move in and out of those respective communities at different times. The strongest similarities I see between both groups is that both have been dehumanised, and both have been pathologised. Now, as the times change, both become identities. Something you are, rather than something you have.

I think a community can be real even if it's only online. A group whose members have a shared feature will become a movement if those members decide that shared feature causes them to be treated badly, and decide to do something about it.