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SaveFerris
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09 May 2017, 8:15 am

liveandrew wrote:
Grrr! Conveyor arrangers and bag organisers unite!

.


ha ha yeah. Hopefully it was a one off event but just in case I will avoid that cashier like the plague from now on or stick to the self scan checkout.


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Campin_Cat
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09 May 2017, 12:56 pm

SaveFerris wrote:
I went shopping at a supermarket the other day and when I went to the checkout I put my items on the conveyor. I like to group the items so like items can go in the same bag (i.e group all the frozen stuff together). This has never been a problem for me or any other cashier but that day the cashier must of decided my grouping didn't make sense to her so she decided to scan items in the order she felt appropriate even if it meant stretching over food to get said items. It totally messed with the way I like to do things , I started to lose my s**t and it took all my effort not to scream WTF at her.

Oh, God, I SOOOOOO know this feeling. I've gotten alot better, but it used to be that if a cashier did this, it would be all I could do, to not want to SMACK 'em!! Anybody who thinks it's okay to put cold things (aka soon-to-be wet things) in with not-cold things, shouldn't be a cashier----and, the interesting thing is, they're probably the type of people that, if somebody did that to THEM, they'd have a COW!! LOL

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In response to the OP: Yeah, I've been a cashier at several different kinds of places, and LOVE it----but, because of my ADHD, I would NOT love it if I had to be confined to a small box (literal, like in a grocery store). I need to be able to move, around; like, in a bigger box, at-the-least. I was a cashier at a dollar-store, one time, and the area was a fairly good size rectangle with cases all around the register, and I had to get stuff out of the cases for customers; and, if nothing else, I could at least pace back-and-forth, and even help hang merchandise on the walls, during slow periods.

Also, I was a cashier in a restaurant, once----but, even though my primary job was Cashier, when it was slow, and since the registers were right where the food prep / cook area was, I could switch-off and make salads, or if the cooks got "in the weeds" (restaurant talk, for "got behind in orders"), I could make french fries, or garlic toast, or whatever, too----so, that was a GOOD job.





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Tiankay
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09 May 2017, 2:43 pm

I worked 4 weeks in a small B&M vape shop as an internship. It wasnt easy, but for the most part it was manageable. I wasnt confined to a small box like in a supermarket though, instead i was standing behind a counter where i was able and needed to move freely. I would hand out batterys for the flavour samplers, take orders, get them from the juice wall and the small hardware depot and sold them at the counter again. Part of the job was to advise new customers to what kind of setup would fit their needs, i still liked it, but this was the most exhausting part of the job apart from the constant background radio and street noises.

I really liked doing the customer service assignments because that usually ment i would be needed to fiddle with a customers rebuildable atomizer (There was a time where i completely obsessed about them) and people would actually happy about me hyperfocussing into something i like and doing a longer than average, but perfectionist job.

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racheypie666
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09 May 2017, 3:07 pm

I have to work as a cashier sometimes at my job. I'm ok at it, though at my last observation, I got picked up on not making any eye contact with the customer :lol: , and I had to do extra training.
I also don't really talk to them beyond what is absolutely necessary. I'm not unpleasant (silence can come off as rudeness though); I'm just not as chatty as some of my colleagues.

On busy days when there's lots of noise and lights and crowds and screaming kids and smells from the restaurant and the sound of someone emptying a tonne of coppers into the change machine... yeah, I'm not a very good cashier then. I zone out rather than let myself meltdown, and time seems to stop on occasion.

I much prefer it in my little office, or sorting things off the shop floor. I genuinely love sorting things.



FreakyZettairyouiki
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09 May 2017, 4:00 pm

I'm not sure if I could survive as a cashier or any retail job for that matter. I feel like over time I would get used to the social cues and the environment and would be able to "learn' the rules, but there's always going to be that one customer that will make me nervous or might pick at my body language. My dad did the same thing to this girl that was serving us at Dunkin and he was like 'I bet she's new here". Imagine if that was me. Not to mention even if I plaster on a smiley face and act all nice, I will want to go home and puke at the end of the day. I always have to try to "act" whenever I meet strangers or teachers in public, but I would hate doing that for 40 hours a week. Even in school, we have to do simulated counseling sessions where we pretend to talk to patients and I'm not that great at it. It took me some time to improve and even then I'm just average if barely. I forget so many steps about this and that to ask the patient. It doesn't help that I'm awkward and introverted. I would personally prefer a job that doesn't require so much public interaction. I just know my strengths and I know that even if you trained me, I'm not sure if I would be able to fully grasp the complexities and I don't want to make any embarrassing mistakes, particularly as a pharmacy technician which is even worse than being a cashier, if anyone is familiar with this job. Maybe I could be more confident in myself and I try to be but it's frustrating because I always keep making mistakes.

StarTrekker wrote:
I worked at Walmart for two years as a cake decorator in the bakery. I had an accommodation which permitted me to avoid being transferred to cashier, which they wanted to do early on, but I explained that with my diagnosis, I couldn't deal with that much visual chaos and rapid switching of attention from one task to another, especially while being under time pressure. Regardless of where I end up in this life, I know that unless it's for a tiny independently owned store with very little traffic, I could never make a successful cashier.


Kinda surprised a franchise was willing to accomodate you. I would think they would just hire someone else.


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CockneyRebel
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10 May 2017, 12:39 am

I wouldn't be able to handle working as a cashier. I couldn't handle the fast pace and the beeps. I also couldn't handle the customer complaints.


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Cad
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10 May 2017, 4:10 am

Yes at a vegetable market. This guy had an argument with me because he thought he was buying a turnip but he was actually buying a swede.


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RandomFox
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10 May 2017, 6:57 am

I work in a pharmacy dispensary, but sometimes I have to go out and work behind the till too. It became easier with time, but I still have trouble concentrating on what the person is saying and then pressing the right buttons on the till. I rarely have little conversations with people (my colleagues do it effortlessly)



JimSpark
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10 May 2017, 2:26 pm

My very first job was as a cashier. It was a cash-only environment where no credit cards were accepted. In that role I did really well, and appeared unusual to everyone because I was able to instantly and correctly calculate the customer's exact change on every transaction. The cash register wasn't one where it could calculate the customer's change for you, it was an old-school one where the cashier had to figure it out every time. I had no customer complaints, and I usually had my register balance to the penny every day. My bosses loved me!

I guess I was very lucky to have been born with some mathematic skill that just enabled me to do that. I never had to learn how to do it, it's just always been there. Although I'm no longer a cashier, one of the few comforts I have when interacting with people is that if cash is being transacted NO ONE will ever take advantage of me 8)


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liveandrew
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10 May 2017, 3:45 pm

Cad wrote:
Yes at a vegetable market. This guy had an argument with me because he thought he was buying a turnip but he was actually buying a swede.

Where I come from, we call a swede a turnip. I believe Scots do the same.


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TheSilentOne
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10 May 2017, 6:10 pm

I was a cashier at Kmart for a portion of the time I worked there. I liked it okay, but people very often complained that I was "not fast enough". They moved me over to "softlines" (things like clothes, shoes, and accessories) after that, which was something I ended up being pretty good at.


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Cad
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11 May 2017, 7:17 am

liveandrew wrote:
Cad wrote:
Yes at a vegetable market. This guy had an argument with me because he thought he was buying a turnip but he was actually buying a swede.

Where I come from, we call a swede a turnip. I believe Scots do the same.


This guy didn't say they were the same, he was pointing out the differences to me but got them around the wrong way (Well, what we perceive the differences to be in Australia haha). They were priced differently due to different growers stocking them, maybe he was just after a discount? Either way, I love them both!


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Joe90
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11 May 2017, 8:56 am

Being a cashier in a supermarket will be OK for me...until a young person comes along with alcohol or anything else where age approval is needed. I would find it awkward to ask, and if they look young and say they don't have ID, I'll find it difficult to argue. I'd probably end up being too lenient and letting kids get away with buying things they shouldn't, then getting myself into trouble.
Also screaming toddlers is the number 1 reason why I don't like working in a shop. I can't tolerate it. I think I have misophonia.


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jrjones9933
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11 May 2017, 10:12 am

I ran a register for a small shop whose products interested me. Later, I worked at a grocery store, but not as a cashier. I don't think I could have done well.

There's a cashier at a bakery near me who seems autistic to me. She's also attractive, which must help.


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11 May 2017, 2:22 pm

seaweasel wrote:
has anyone ever been a cashier with autism? i find it easy and i have been doing it for two years.

That is so great. I am so glad you are doing well with that. I have worked a cash register at several types of stores, clothing and cafes, but was never just a cashier. I actually really enjoyed the interactions I had with customers when I did that, especially with regulars.


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friedmacguffins
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11 May 2017, 2:34 pm

If I'm paying attention to the numbers, I have a photographic memory. I am an adding machine.

If I'm paying attention to people, I can't find the buttons. I was in trouble for not being engaging-enough.

Otherwise, perfect discipline.

The name was written on my tag, horribly. I wiped it off, with cleaner (on my own time), and replaced it, with a legible, printed label, and got in trouble for that. I would typically look for pragmatic, win-win solutions, and lose promotions and job interviews, for not following the narrowly-worded policies. You were generally supposed to ask for the advice of management, at each, small juncture, and, then, not to ask too often. Either way was wrong. Lose-lose.

I oriented managers, and new hires, and was usually liked, for making things work, without any head trips. I would get the combinations to safes, and be trusted to handle large amounts of money, but without any expectation of a survivable wage and reliable transportation.

The system uses people, gladly, and sets them up to fail.