I'm Not An Aspie. I Lied During My Assessment.

Page 7 of 9 [ 129 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

Leeds_Demon
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 26 May 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 60

05 Oct 2017, 6:23 pm

bumbleme
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 23 May 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 99
Location: Australia

06 Oct 2017, 4:16 am

B19 wrote:

Fact is, many AS people do things in AS ways, to get to the same ends, and NT awareness of this fact is primitive as yet.
NTs make an error of reasoning in that if we don't do things their way, they wrongly assume we can't do it at all.


Yes! Thanks for putting that so succinctly.



quaker
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2010
Age: 54
Gender: Male
Posts: 485
Location: London

06 Oct 2017, 4:18 am

It is quite feasible and to some extent even logical, that many in the high functioning end of the spectrum would be economical with the truth in an assessment. Whether this actually constitutes a lie or not is not easy to ascertain.

For example, many high functioning folks who were diagnosed mid life have spent their entire life up to the diagnosis living a kind of lie to themselves. For this was the consequence of unconsciously over-compensating for something they never knew was going on within themselves.

As a result, when such an individual presents themselves to a "professional" who is it that is actually presenting themselves, the highly adaptive self, or the person with autism - so be it a mild expression. In extreme cases - and there are many such cases - the individuals adaptive self pushes out the natural autistic personality, this can mask and distract the deeper authentic expressions and behaviours. Likewise, an overly adaptive person in the spectrum can feel in conflict as to how to answer diagnostic question feeling, "Is this question directed to my adaptive self, or natural aspie self.

There are many who fall into this category. Caught in- between many worlds.The neurologically typically and autistic. The highly and overly adaptive self and the true Self. Any assessment carried out under such conditions is complex and very difficult to understand.



Last edited by quaker on 06 Oct 2017, 4:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

bumbleme
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 23 May 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 99
Location: Australia

06 Oct 2017, 4:21 am

B19 wrote:
Yes, some can and do. The deeper issue is that NTs don't question the myth they have made and apply to all of us.

And this one too. I wonder how long it will take them to figure it out.



bumbleme
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 23 May 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 99
Location: Australia

06 Oct 2017, 4:31 am

You say you don't offend people and are very polite. I wonder if you relate to this: In recent years (well, up until about 2 years ago) I was extremely polite. I was so careful not to say anything that would offend people that really didn't say much at all. Now I'm a lot less inhibited than I was, and the autism is more obvious - I'm not mistaken as simply shy as often.



bumbleme
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 23 May 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 99
Location: Australia

06 Oct 2017, 4:38 am

Also, I was wondering a few years ago if I was autistic. almost went to get a diagnostic assessment done but decided against it because I didn't fit the AQ-test maths-loving stereotype. Had I been diagnosed back then, probably would've saved some grief. Though back then it probably wouldn't have been picked up because I played imaginatively as a kid.



Leeds_Demon
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 26 May 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 60

06 Oct 2017, 10:15 am

@bumbleme: I can say I don't fit any type of Aspie, (please see previous posts, as I'll have to re-hash and you might end up bored).
If the psychologist, who assessed me had asked if I have any particular skills/special interests, (which I subsume myself in for months/years), she might have come to a different conclusion. I don't present with repititive behaviours, (I certainly don't stim), and any interests I develop, I become bored of easily.
That's another question: do all aspies stim?



ToughDiamond
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Age: 67
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,405

06 Oct 2017, 12:34 pm

quaker wrote:
when such an individual presents themselves to a "professional" who is it that is actually presenting themselves, the highly adaptive self, or the person with autism - so be it a mild expression. In extreme cases - and there are many such cases - the individuals adaptive self pushes out the natural autistic personality, this can mask and distract the deeper authentic expressions and behaviours. Likewise, an overly adaptive person in the spectrum can feel in conflict as to how to answer diagnostic question feeling, "Is this question directed to my adaptive self, or natural aspie self.

My way of putting it is that I'd got into the habit of presenting myself in a distorted way, so that I wouldn't look odd and invite contempt. So when I was assessed, I felt I needed to try to remove that disguise. I couldn't completely do it, because I wasn't aware of all of the distortions, and even when I was, to deliberately regress felt dishonest. More positively, practically everybody adjusts to life as they grow, which is often a good thing, and it's also a good thing that such adjustments often become part of the person, like the ability to ride a bicycle, though some adjustments will probably always be painful and feel unnatural, and couldn't even be applied at all on a bad day.

In a sense I see the assessment itself as something of a lie, because instead of being a scientific assessment of one's native autism, the assessor tends to withhold an ASD diagnosis if the client has adapted to the extent that the underlying condition isn't impacting significantly on their life, which to my mind makes no more sense than saying somebody's legs aren't paralysed because they happen to own a wheelchair. The assessment may be valid enough if all you want to know is how disabled you appear to be, but as well as getting exempted from Aspie-unfriendly duties in my workplace, I also wanted to know how natively autistic I was. It's a complicated subject.



marcaevans
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 10 Nov 2016
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 13
Location: United Kingdom

06 Oct 2017, 3:42 pm

I think everyone is different on the spectrum, also I believe its very difficult to lie at the assessment because these are specialists trained to recognise ASD. I don't always experience sensory overload when in public, I think it's a NT belief that we are supposed to always experience it though. If I am particularly stressed or had a bad start to the day I am more prone to it though. I think my major traits are routines and ability to socialise/make small talk.


_________________
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 162 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 37 of 200
AQ Score 45/50

Diagnosed ASD November 2016


bumbleme
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 23 May 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 99
Location: Australia

07 Oct 2017, 9:59 am

Maybe you have some OCD?



Voxish
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 16 Apr 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 426

07 Oct 2017, 10:34 am

I cannot believe that the attention seeker is still being fed, good grief


_________________
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder (Level 1)
AQ: 42
RAADS-R: 160
BBC: Radio 4


StampySquiddyFan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Jul 2017
Age: 16
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,754
Location: Stampy's Lovely World

07 Oct 2017, 12:27 pm

bumbleme wrote:
Maybe you have some OCD?


I agree. To the OP- you may just have traits of OCD, but this seems almost exactly like me when I obsess over my diagnosis. Thankfully, I have mostly been able to overcome those doubts (they used to plague me 24/7), but it wasn't easy and it took quite a while. Just think about it- your obsession is whether or not you have Asperger's Syndrome or not. Your compulsion is coming here for reassurance, but it isn't enough to have diagnosed autistics say they don't have a certain trait (such as perfect pitch or special interests)- it isn't reassuring enough anymore. If you want to rid yourself of these doubts, you are going to need to work at it, like I had to. It is so unbelievably hard, but if you want to know for sure and stop obsessing, you need to take the necessary steps in order to get rid of this particular obsession.

(By the way- OCD is very often comorbid with autism. There's more evidence for you that these worries and doubts are unfounded (and when I say unfounded, I don't mean that they aren't real worries and I am not making fun of you in any way- I just mean that your obsessions are irrational like mine) :D .


_________________
Hi! I'm Stampy (not the actual YouTuber, just a fan!) and I have been diagnosed professionally with ASD and OCD and likely have TS. If you have any questions or just want to talk, please feel free to PM me!

Current Interests: Stampy Cat, AGT, and Medicine


Leeds_Demon
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 26 May 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 60

07 Oct 2017, 12:46 pm

@Voxish: really? I wouldn't dare call anyone an attention seeker, if they posted something that made them consider their diagnosis.
.. maybe you can tell me why it is, that I am supposedly an aspie, and yet I have stimmed in my whole life, (flapping my hands, twirling, etc)? The psychologist, who assessed me, never asked if I stimmed. Given that every aspie is supposed to stim, those of us, who don't, can't be autistic.



B19
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,448
Location: New Zealand

07 Oct 2017, 3:14 pm

Stimming has never, ever, been part of formal diagnostic criteria. Nor has any member here has ever claimed that all ASD people stim, AFAIK, except for one anti-neurodiversity troll that we banned several times.



Leeds_Demon
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 26 May 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 60

07 Oct 2017, 4:28 pm

I've read posts on this foroum, read articles on the internet. Stimming is considered to be repititive behaviour. I used to make up pop songs, as a girl and used to sing in my bedroom & I made the noises for the instruments. I've never flapped my hands/jumped up and down/wiggled my feet/whatever.

All the articles and the posts I've read, stimming is an integral part of asperger's. If stimmimg is supposed to relieve stress, the I've never been stressed.

Even when my dad was dying, I wasn't stressed enough to wave my hands about, or twirl around. I'm fortunate, in that I'm single, (so I never have meltdowns), I work from home and I don't go out. By not living with anyone, (if you're an adult), and working from home, stress can be reduced, as people cause stress.