I'm wondering if I should be looking at ADHD, etc...

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Angnix
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17 Mar 2018, 4:29 pm

I've had an almost obsession about Asperger's over the last 10 years, when in reality I'm diagnosed with bipolar disorder (unspecified, I don't have very severe depressions but I get strong mixed episodes/mania with psychosis when unmedicated/medicated wrong). As a child I was diagnosed as having an emotional impairment/ADHD. Do these symptoms really sound like Asperger's if I spell them out again? To use a metaphor am I barking up the wrong tree?

Meltdowns are my most devestating symptom. As a child up until I was a teenager they happened almost everyday. Now I get them occasionally, but as an adult I tend to get more violent by throwing things. As a kid I was punished a lot for meltdowns when in fact I couldn't help having them.

As a child I had such bad social skills they tried to force me to have friends. I went through lots of therapy. As an adult I still make mistakes.

I have strong interests in things to the point that I can stay engrossed in a topic like birds for years. Sometimes I go out of my way to endulge my obsessions.

I stim and rock a lot.

Unaspie like, I'm very emotional. In fact I have "labile" immature and rapidly changing emotions like a young child. I dont have trouble reading the emotions of others and I look people in the eyes. I'm very impulsive and make decisions too fast based on my strong emotions.

I have an IQ that tested out in the high 120's as a child. Verbal iq 20 points higher than performance. I found academics "easy" and I currently hold a bachelor's of science and I wanted to go beyond that.

If AS is the wrong direction what should I be looking at?


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17 Mar 2018, 4:59 pm

I cant really help you but i have a question about your post, why do people keep listing their IQ on this site? I dont understand why that matters or maybe im missing something, ASD doesnt automatically give anyone a high IQ, I dont think any mental disability or learning disability does. Is there a reason people do this other than to boast a bit?



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17 Mar 2018, 5:12 pm

Trum wrote:
I cant really help you but i have a question about your post, why do people keep listing their IQ on this site? I dont understand why that matters or maybe im missing something, ASD doesnt automatically give anyone a high IQ, I dont think any mental disability or learning disability does. Is there a reason people do this other than to boast a bit?

A part of it might be because alot of us like facts----for instance, when someone says they were tested, then the result to some people, means "fact"----and, if the "fact" involves a number, that seems to make it empirical, maybe; IDK. Another reason may be because sometimes when we're posting about a problem we're having, we're feeling a little insecure, and if we prove that we're not stupid / flawed / whatever, then we're not.

I agree----I think IQ means next-to-nothing----but, it's important to some of us. Also, I think some people think having Asperger's means someone's really smart----but, like you said, it doesn't.





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17 Mar 2018, 6:05 pm

Campin_Cat wrote:
Trum wrote:
I cant really help you but i have a question about your post, why do people keep listing their IQ on this site? I dont understand why that matters or maybe im missing something, ASD doesnt automatically give anyone a high IQ, I dont think any mental disability or learning disability does. Is there a reason people do this other than to boast a bit?

A part of it might be because alot of us like facts----for instance, when someone says they were tested, then the result to some people, means "fact"----and, if the "fact" involves a number, that seems to make it empirical, maybe; IDK. Another reason may be because sometimes when we're posting about a problem we're having, we're feeling a little insecure, and if we prove that we're not stupid / flawed / whatever, then we're not.

I agree----I think IQ means next-to-nothing----but, it's important to some of us. Also, I think some people think having Asperger's means someone's really smart----but, like you said, it doesn't.


I guess that makes sense but i mean i could say i had a 180 IQ, there is no proof and then where did you get the test, you can take 2-3 IQ tests and get a different score on each, i dont know....i really think IQ is one of those silly things but if it makes people feel a bit better about themselves then great! I wouldn't even know how to get a REAL IQ test, i feel most people are quoting those silly website IQ tests.



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17 Mar 2018, 6:57 pm

Trum wrote:
Campin_Cat wrote:
Trum wrote:
I cant really help you but i have a question about your post, why do people keep listing their IQ on this site? I dont understand why that matters or maybe im missing something, ASD doesnt automatically give anyone a high IQ, I dont think any mental disability or learning disability does. Is there a reason people do this other than to boast a bit?

A part of it might be because alot of us like facts----for instance, when someone says they were tested, then the result to some people, means "fact"----and, if the "fact" involves a number, that seems to make it empirical, maybe; IDK. Another reason may be because sometimes when we're posting about a problem we're having, we're feeling a little insecure, and if we prove that we're not stupid / flawed / whatever, then we're not.

I agree----I think IQ means next-to-nothing----but, it's important to some of us. Also, I think some people think having Asperger's means someone's really smart----but, like you said, it doesn't.

i really think IQ is one of those silly things but if it makes people feel a bit better about themselves then great!

Yeah, I agree. I'm often preachin' on here about age, education, and IQ meaning next-to-nothin'----I've got all 3, and it don't mean Jack!! LOL




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18 Mar 2018, 12:32 am

I don't even know what my IQ is, but I don't think it's higher than average.

I was diagnosed with Asperger's in childhood but diagnosed with ADHD in my twenties. Sometimes I question my AS diagnosis because I've always been rather good at reading body language and all of that stuff. But as a teenager my social skills seemed to regress and I done strange things when I was 14 that I knew better not to do at age 9. I was too socially dim as a teenager to be non-Aspie. But fortunately my social skills improved again at around 17, and they have improved so much that I barely feel like an Aspie any more, not only socially, but also other symptoms too.

But my ADHD seems to be more obvious as I've gotten older. I have impulsive habits, I can't stop talking (mostly small talk), I find it hard to sit or stand still for long periods of time, I am messy and disorganised, I can be hyper in my behaviour, I have racing thoughts, I get too distracted by everything, I lack attention, and I feel like my mind is on "fast forward".


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18 Mar 2018, 2:53 am

IQ is relevant because high IQ, particularly in women with ASD, makes it easier to see social patterns and camouflage.

Traditionally, mostly women with low IQ and/or significant behvioral problems were diagnosed. The OP is an adult, so she would belong to the group that had a low chance of getting a correct diagnosis, particularly if everything was attributed to ADHD. Also, for a while, it was not possible to have a diagnosis of both conditions; the assessor would have to choose only one.

The obsessive, long-lasting interests signal ASD to me. Also, the emotions that have no 'medium strength' are not uncommon on the spectrum.

OP: you say you read people's emotions, yet you were not at all able to make friends as a child. Are you sure your reading of emotions is that good? Do you read people's emotions in real time and react to them instinctively, or do you analyze them after the conversation is over?


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18 Mar 2018, 3:04 am

Well I know when I was a kid some teachers thought I could have ADHD, but they never thought it quite seemed to fit. Like I think the stuff they saw as potential ADHD was more autistic stimming and some emotional outbursts when I got overwhelmed. From what i understand with adhd its like more of a lack of being stimulated by things and a shorter attention span...I know it is more complex than that, but its kind of the opposite of where when I was 'fidgeting' or whatever it was helping me focus not working as a distraction. Like when I read a book I do this thing where i fidget with the page I am not reading, like I kind of crinkle it so where some teachers maybe assumed it distracted me in reality it was probably aiding in my concentration. I'm not usually aware I am doing it unless someone points it out or I get distracted from reading and notice myself doing it but then if I become aware and try to stop I have a hard time concentrating on the text.


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18 Mar 2018, 3:13 am

underwater wrote:
IQ is relevant because high IQ, particularly in women with ASD, makes it easier to see social patterns and camouflage.

Traditionally, mostly women with low IQ and/or significant behvioral problems were diagnosed. The OP is an adult, so she would belong to the group that had a low chance of getting a correct diagnosis, particularly if everything was attributed to ADHD. Also, for a while, it was not possible to have a diagnosis of both conditions; the assessor would have to choose only one.

The obsessive, long-lasting interests signal ASD to me. Also, the emotions that have no 'medium strength' are not uncommon on the spectrum.

OP: you say you read people's emotions, yet you were not at all able to make friends as a child. Are you sure your reading of emotions is that good? Do you read people's emotions in real time and react to them instinctively, or do you analyze them after the conversation is over?



Sometimes I have longed for having a lower IQ, like seriously I have thought if I was less intelligent I would be happier. See my problem is I have seen social patterns and maybe could camouflage if I really tried. But with my intelligence I also see through a lot of that stuff so its ended up where sometimes I can't fake it because I am too aware and know its all B.S so I don't want to participate with all that small talk and niceties.


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18 Mar 2018, 3:48 am

Sweetleaf wrote:
underwater wrote:
IQ is relevant because high IQ, particularly in women with ASD, makes it easier to see social patterns and camouflage.

Traditionally, mostly women with low IQ and/or significant behvioral problems were diagnosed. The OP is an adult, so she would belong to the group that had a low chance of getting a correct diagnosis, particularly if everything was attributed to ADHD. Also, for a while, it was not possible to have a diagnosis of both conditions; the assessor would have to choose only one.

The obsessive, long-lasting interests signal ASD to me. Also, the emotions that have no 'medium strength' are not uncommon on the spectrum.

OP: you say you read people's emotions, yet you were not at all able to make friends as a child. Are you sure your reading of emotions is that good? Do you read people's emotions in real time and react to them instinctively, or do you analyze them after the conversation is over?



Sometimes I have longed for having a lower IQ, like seriously I have thought if I was less intelligent I would be happier. See my problem is I have seen social patterns and maybe could camouflage if I really tried. But with my intelligence I also see through a lot of that stuff so its ended up where sometimes I can't fake it because I am too aware and know its all B.S so I don't want to participate with all that small talk and niceties.


Well, the fortunate thing is that unless you are the smartest person in the world, there is always someone who is smarter than you. It depends who you meet. I get it that there are people who are more content because they don't see any alternatives, but there are also plenty of people who are nastily surprised by problems others could have foreseen. Unless you're in the 150 and counting group, I doubt high intelligence is a handicap.


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18 Mar 2018, 11:12 am

underwater wrote:
IQ is relevant because high IQ, particularly in women with ASD, makes it easier to see social patterns and camouflage.

underwater wrote:
Unless you're in the 150 and counting group, I doubt high intelligence is a handicap.

I respectfully disagree with these two statements. I have been preaching on here for ages that IQ means next-to-nothing----even education, IMO, can mean next-to-nothing----because these things don't make one "smart", they only, IMO, make one "learned". I have seen people on here who trumpet their degree or IQ, and I'm thinking: "Good Lord----it's a wonder you have enough sense to come-in out of the rain!!" LOL Really, though, who / what is "smart", is subjective----some people think that number or degree is PROOF; I say that's total horse-hockey!!

Seeing "social patterns" does NOT mean, IMO, that we instantly / instinctively know what to do, to camouflage----that must be LEARNED; and, of course, we Aspies struggle terribly, with that----so, IMO, IQ IS a handicap, because we look at things differently. I know how analytical I am----sometimes (MOST-times, probably) things don't need "all that"..... Like, lots of times, throughout my entire life, people have told me: "You're thinking about it, too much". We Aspies----or, maybe I should just speak for myself..... Lots of times, I want an ANSWER----a black-and-white-no-denying-PAT answer----one that I can return to, as "THEE answer", each time----but, life just isn't like that, and it's a struggle to accept that. (My theory is, we want a "thee answer" because it takes us so long to figure-out stuff, sometimes, that we want something about which we don't have to think anymore----because thinking is such a struggle----then, we can move-on to tackle the NEXT thing.)

IMO, others, say, with lower IQ have WAAAAAAAY less of a struggle----they look at something, "see" the answer, are successful at completing whatever task, and move-on. I hem-and-haw, write lists, compare pros and cons, analyze, overthink, think about things from a different angle, etc., etc., etc., and then get overwhelmed, and give-up.





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18 Mar 2018, 11:54 am

Campin_Cat wrote:
underwater wrote:
IQ is relevant because high IQ, particularly in women with ASD, makes it easier to see social patterns and camouflage.

underwater wrote:
Unless you're in the 150 and counting group, I doubt high intelligence is a handicap.

I respectfully disagree with these two statements. I have been preaching on here for ages that IQ means next-to-nothing----even education, IMO, can mean next-to-nothing----because these things don't make one "smart", they only, IMO, make one "learned". I have seen people on here who trumpet their degree or IQ, and I'm thinking: "Good Lord----it's a wonder you have enough sense to come-in out of the rain!!" LOL Really, though, who / what is "smart", is subjective----some people think that number or degree is PROOF; I say that's total horse-hockey!!

Seeing "social patterns" does NOT mean, IMO, that we instantly / instinctively know what to do, to camouflage----that must be LEARNED; and, of course, we Aspies struggle terribly, with that----so, IMO, IQ IS a handicap, because we look at things differently. I know how analytical I am----sometimes (MOST-times, probably) things don't need "all that"..... Like, lots of times, throughout my entire life, people have told me: "You're thinking about it, too much". We Aspies----or, maybe I should just speak for myself..... Lots of times, I want an ANSWER----a black-and-white-no-denying-PAT answer----one that I can return to, as "THEE answer", each time----but, life just isn't like that, and it's a struggle to accept that. (My theory is, we want a "thee answer" because it takes us so long to figure-out stuff, sometimes, that we want something about which we don't have to think anymore----because thinking is such a struggle----then, we can move-on to tackle the NEXT thing.)

IMO, others, say, with lower IQ have WAAAAAAAY less of a struggle----they look at something, "see" the answer, are successful at completing whatever task, and move-on. I hem-and-haw, write lists, compare pros and cons, analyze, overthink, think about things from a different angle, etc., etc., etc., and then get overwhelmed, and give-up.


You're looking at this from an entirely different perspective. I agree with you about the uselessness of IQ on its own. I'm not trying to trumpet the value of high IQ. What I'm saying is that based on scientific studies, women with ASD traditionally stood a low chance of getting a correct diagnosis, and with it help, if they had high IQ. Which supports your point. These women have had a lot of bad experiences in life, and often a lot of wrong or incomplete diagnoses, precisely because they had high IQ.

The second point I am trying to make is that IQ on its own doesn't mean a lot. I am suspicious of the idea that lower IQ in itself will make you happier, that's all. I think happiness depends on entirely different things than IQ.

We agree, you know :D


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18 Mar 2018, 1:40 pm

I put the iq stuff on there because I knew that it could affect diagnosis. I remember having a harder time reading people as a child.

As an adult as far as any testing I had a therapist who suspected autism spectrum give me the AQ and the RAADS scales for adults which both tested in the AS range but mild, but for some reason my actual psycharist disagreed with them. I've had a couple other docs come up with the theory I'm on the spectrum but can't be diagnosed because I'm not impaired enough. I've had a few total strangers say I highly remind them of Asperger's females they know, but my own relatives don't believe it, I have a female close relative with classic autism who is only partially verbal and me who talked at the correct age they don't believe there is a link of any kind.


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18 Mar 2018, 2:05 pm

Have you found being on WP helpful to you? If not, then perhaps ASD is not you. If you do find it helpful though I think it most likely that you are on the spectrum. I am still being surprised by how I seem to think along similar tracks to people here but still end up with vastly different opinions to them on things :D



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18 Mar 2018, 2:09 pm

Angnix wrote:
I put the iq stuff on there because I knew that it could affect diagnosis. I remember having a harder time reading people as a child.

As an adult as far as any testing I had a therapist who suspected autism spectrum give me the AQ and the RAADS scales for adults which both tested in the AS range but mild, but for some reason my actual psycharist disagreed with them. I've had a couple other docs come up with the theory I'm on the spectrum but can't be diagnosed because I'm not impaired enough. I've had a few total strangers say I highly remind them of Asperger's females they know, but my own relatives don't believe it, I have a female close relative with classic autism who is only partially verbal and me who talked at the correct age they don't believe there is a link of any kind.


My aspie daughter spoke at 6 months, lots of recognisable words. So super early. Her NT sister spoke much later.

Regarding IQ, If you are looking at something like the WISC I think the main helpful aspect of it to see if there are any significant peaks and lows, for example my daughter has high IQ overall but low average processing speed. In terms of educational support she might need very different support than someone who scores low overall.


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18 Mar 2018, 2:15 pm

Angnix wrote:
I put the iq stuff on there because I knew that it could affect diagnosis. I remember having a harder time reading people as a child.

As an adult as far as any testing I had a therapist who suspected autism spectrum give me the AQ and the RAADS scales for adults which both tested in the AS range but mild, but for some reason my actual psycharist disagreed with them. I've had a couple other docs come up with the theory I'm on the spectrum but can't be diagnosed because I'm not impaired enough. I've had a few total strangers say I highly remind them of Asperger's females they know, but my own relatives don't believe it, I have a female close relative with classic autism who is only partially verbal and me who talked at the correct age they don't believe there is a link of any kind.


So how do the docs explain the meltdowns?


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