Vulnerable persons list (lack of a better name)

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Arevelion
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06 Dec 2018, 7:01 am

I'm still a little confused about how people on the list are actually treated by the Scottish police. Are they watched constantly? Seems unlikely considering how big the list is.

Also does it work? Are less people murdered and raped because of this list? Probably too early to tell.

Depending on how those two questions are answered I might not be against the idea if there is proper oversight.



hellhole
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06 Dec 2018, 11:31 am

Well I meant a list that would be private and not accessible to the public, only to the police and the like.


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kraftiekortie
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06 Dec 2018, 11:39 am

I wouldn't want to be on a "list" which is accessible to the police.

It's not that I don't trust police; I happen to work in a criminal justice capacity. I work and interact with police officers. I have a decent admiration for the police.

It's just sort of a "principle" type of thing.



Arevelion
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06 Dec 2018, 12:13 pm

Well I will be watching how this shakes out in Scotland the best I can. If it actually protects people I think that having such a list here in the states is worth considering.

I am so sick of my fellow autistic people getting raped. I'm open to basically anything at this point.



Jo_B1_Kenobi
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06 Dec 2018, 1:15 pm

In East Anglia, in England, there is a scheme where anyone with ASD of any kind can apply for a card from an organisation which works with the Police and Emergency Services. The card explains that you have autism and that, should you be in custody, or in hospital or need to access emergency services, that you may present differently and may need the help of an appropriate adult. It's called and Autism Alert Card and I have one and have found it very helpful.

Normally I cope very well, work in a responsible job, own my own flat and bring up my son. But at the times when I've been ill enough to need the hospital, or been assautled and needed the police I find I am much less able to cope and hold it together. By giving people at the hospital my card I can explain what's wrong better even when I'm not managing at all. I think this is because once they've seen the card they know I'm going to present a little oddly and don't make assumptions about how I'm behaving. It's the same with the police. Police officers around here are generally quite friendly but, because they deal with a lot of liars and thieves, they respond to someone who presents a little oddly like they're up to no good. I used to ride a big motorcycle (Kawasak 750 GPZ). I was still a primary school teacher but one that rode a bike. Because I was a bit odd in the way I spoke they would always go over every inch of my bike to try to find something illegal and be very rude and treat me in a cross way as if I'd done something wrong. They also would make me produce my papers at the station every few weeks. Now I've got the card, they read it, ask me some basic questions they'd ask anyone and let me go on my way. I don't get any of the anger and sarcasm I used to get from them. (The sarcasm was particularly hard to deal with as I only knew it was sarcasm when I told someone else about it later by which time it was too late and I'd already said something stupid.)

Anyway, if anyone's interested in the scheme and thinking it might be useful in their area here's a link to the website...

https://www.autism-anglia.org.uk/alert-card

(PS: Only people with a formal diagnosis can get a card - they have to have proof from a relevant medical professional before you get a card issued.)


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BeaArthur
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06 Dec 2018, 2:42 pm

Jo_B1_Kenobi wrote:
In East Anglia, in England, there is a scheme where anyone with ASD of any kind can apply for a card from an organisation which works with the Police and Emergency Services. The card explains that you have autism and that, should you be in custody, or in hospital or need to access emergency services, that you may present differently and may need the help of an appropriate adult. It's called and Autism Alert Card and I have one and have found it very helpful.

Normally I cope very well, work in a responsible job, own my own flat and bring up my son. But at the times when I've been ill enough to need the hospital, or been assautled and needed the police I find I am much less able to cope and hold it together. By giving people at the hospital my card I can explain what's wrong better even when I'm not managing at all. I think this is because once they've seen the card they know I'm going to present a little oddly and don't make assumptions about how I'm behaving. It's the same with the police. Police officers around here are generally quite friendly but, because they deal with a lot of liars and thieves, they respond to someone who presents a little oddly like they're up to no good. I used to ride a big motorcycle (Kawasak 750 GPZ). I was still a primary school teacher but one that rode a bike. Because I was a bit odd in the way I spoke they would always go over every inch of my bike to try to find something illegal and be very rude and treat me in a cross way as if I'd done something wrong. They also would make me produce my papers at the station every few weeks. Now I've got the card, they read it, ask me some basic questions they'd ask anyone and let me go on my way. I don't get any of the anger and sarcasm I used to get from them. (The sarcasm was particularly hard to deal with as I only knew it was sarcasm when I told someone else about it later by which time it was too late and I'd already said something stupid.)

Anyway, if anyone's interested in the scheme and thinking it might be useful in their area here's a link to the website...

https://www.autism-anglia.org.uk/alert-card

(PS: Only people with a formal diagnosis can get a card - they have to have proof from a relevant medical professional before you get a card issued.)

That's a more palatable method, I think. The person has the decision to request such a card, and once they have it, has the decision whether to present it or not. The problem with having a list is it could all be done without an individual's knowledge and consent, and the information used without individual consent.


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RichardJ
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06 Dec 2018, 2:48 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
It could be like the Nazi police having a list of “vulnerable Jews.”

Don’t like the idea myself.


This is my thought exactly, the first thing the Nazis did was to register all the Jews.


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