I am suddenly good at reading body language.

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Joe90
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03 Apr 2019, 3:44 pm

I don't do too badly at recognising body language. Some of my body language reading skills must be instinctive, because I can't really explain subtle body language but I know it when I see it, and also I can "feel" it, if that makes sense, like I can feel the emotion the person or people are giving off.


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littlebee
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03 Apr 2019, 4:01 pm

Joey, thanks! This makes a lot of sense and is addressing something important I was going to say in my last message, but forgot: Just because someone picks something up fast such as reading body signals does not necessarily mean this capacity is genetic. it can be learned, and imo generally, is, but the speed it is happening at is faster. There are lots of reasons both environmental and sometimes genetic why a person may pick something up at a faster speed, faster to the degree that someone watching from the outside, especially someone kind of clueless, meaning conditioned to frame and process data in a certain mode or maybe just not paying attention, might conclude that it is automatic/genetic like a newborn duck that emerges from the egg following its mother and suddenly starting to swim.



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03 Apr 2019, 9:53 pm

You could have been making neurological connections beforehand and over time gradually accumulated information without knowing. Your unconscious processes used what you have built up to assemble a basic understanding of body language and similarly related cues.

I imagine that the process was motivated by you first learning to recognize reward, like visual approval or disapproval cues given off by others, and that lead to your brain figuring out how to decide on what connections to make.

It's kind of similar to what I've done but mine was mixed, partially an automatic learning process and partially an active effort to assimilate because I had some ideas that were a kind of variation of this hypothesis, and I have empathy so I could feel the impact of having my boundaries invaded when someone else does not understand my own cues. I struggled with that particularly before I started figuring out cues myself.



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04 Apr 2019, 10:31 am

I have learned some body langauge over the years too. It doesn't mean you aren't autistic, it just means you laerned to compensate.


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Dear_one
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04 Apr 2019, 11:04 am

There are also instant experts who have read about the basics of body language, and then believe whatever they want, based on poor interpretations giving their guesses more weight. It is hard to lie with body language, but it is also affected by other body functions or malfunctions.



littlebee
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06 Apr 2019, 10:59 am

wrongcitizen wrote:
You could have been making neurological connections beforehand and over time gradually accumulated information without knowing. Your unconscious processes used what you have built up to assemble a basic understanding of body language and similarly related cues.

I imagine that the process was motivated by you first learning to recognize reward, like visual approval or disapproval cues given off by others, and that lead to your brain figuring out how to decide on what connections to make.

It's kind of similar to what I've done but mine was mixed, partially an automatic learning process and partially an active effort to assimilate because I had some ideas that were a kind of variation of this hypothesis, and I have empathy so I could feel the impact of having my boundaries invaded when someone else does not understand my own cues. I struggled with that particularly before I started figuring out cues myself.


Great message. This is how it has been for me. I think it should be mentioned that many people, not just autistic people, are basically clueless about body language, including, and especially, deliberate facial mechanics, at least to the degree I have leaned it, but a lot of people know it, too. Originally, years (decades:-) ago, I had no idea at all that such a thing even existed. Literally no idea. Zero. I was literally completely clueless. Someone even told me once (in a kind way) when I was in my twenties that I could benefit by being aware of my own facial expressions, and I had no idea what they were talking about. (Not even sure I do even now, but kind of:-) This is the first time I ever told anyone this, and the previous, too: The way I finally began to learn was because I was hanging out with a lot of musicians and hard core jazz lovers, hearing a lot of live music before I became a musician myself, and one time I noticed a woman was actually communicating with someone else about me by facial expressions such as a raised eyebrows in front of me and I was shocked. This is not a story I am proud to tell but then I confronted this woman I thought was my friend who was doing this and asked her if she was actually doing this, and she finally admitted, "yes." Ha ha. This is how clueless I was, and probably in some ways still am. This was probably a very odd interaction the likes of which does not generally occur, which only goes to show how clueless I was, as most people would just eventually catch on and not confront anyone. Anyway, after that I dedicated myself to learning. It did take many years, Well worth it, though.

And as wrongcitizen has pointed out, but to use my own words, it can be something like learning to ride a bicycle. You can assimilate some aspects without realizing it, and then eventually you just catch on. Of course there is always a fine tuning of the process, especially if a person is a professional biker.. I think there is more potential variety in social communication, though, than in a solitary physical activity. People become more and more creative in how they express things with their faces and their bodies, and learn from each other, so an evolving language,