Page 1 of 2 [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

BeaArthur
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Aug 2015
Posts: 4,998

07 May 2019, 12:55 pm

How many of you are aware of "metacognition"? Briefly it can be defined as "thinking about thinking," but the context I want to discuss here is analysis and awareness of your own mental processes. Once you develop the ability to think about your mental function, you can begin to take control of it. It's very helpful with executive function issues and also emotional regulation.

An example that just occurred in my life is I was waiting for my cup to come around to the front of the microwave. I do that because I'm in a wheelchair and need to be able to reach it easier (it's an under-cabinet type). When it comes near, I just open the door. Now I was thinking "While I wait for the cup, I could get my husband's lunchtime pills ready." Then I reconsidered, thinking "no, if I start to do that I'll forget about the coffee cup and it will get superhot. Better to wait." I was thinking about my own thinking process, namely my distractibility which would cause me to forget one task while doing a different one. Knowledge is power. I waited another 13 seconds for the cup to come around, took it out (at the perfect temperature) and then got the pills ready for my husband.

Another example would be if you can catch yourself starting to ruminate about something that usually brings you down, you can decide to do something different and stave off the bad mood.

Other examples would be noticing you learn best at a certain time of day and then using that time to study; and learning test-taking strategies that allow you to guess when it's advantageous and leave an item blank when guessing is penalized.

Anybody use these tricks?


_________________
Back.


Twilightprincess
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 28 Sep 2016
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,353

07 May 2019, 1:03 pm

I’m very absentminded, so I need to write appointments down in my agenda immediately or I’ll forget to and miss the appointment.

In college, I had to write to do lists for every task to stay on track.

I need to keep my house pretty clean because when it gets too messy I get overwhelmed and stressed which makes it difficult to clean. I’m more relaxed in an uncluttered house.



magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,507
Location: Poland

07 May 2019, 2:06 pm

Yes, it's part of my survival strategy.
Including being able to identify when there is something wrong with my mental health.
I can't see all the patterns but I see a lot of them and I try use them to function better.


_________________
Let's not confuse being normal with being mentally healthy.


Edna3362
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,601
Location: ᜆᜄᜎᜓᜄ᜔

07 May 2019, 2:16 pm

I have some. Like switching (micro)gears is akin the feeling and sensation of catching a ball. It's one of the easiest I could describe.


There are some I do understand -- but that doesn't equally mean acknowledged or accepted.
Then there's the sensitivity causing inconsistency, where there are, like, too many factors to consider. This 'me' at this 'mood', my 'brain' with that 'gut', etc. I'm not always sharp nor always absentminded, not always having the need for caution nor resort recklessness.
Times I have all the desirable traits of executive function and the emotional regulation, times that I flat out don't.
It can change anytime, it can last seconds or months I wouldn't always know. Only few are consistent.

What makes me refuse to accept this was my own desire of wanting to be consistent, my pride, and not wanting to cater my 'worst' just so I won't forget that my 'best' exists and happens. It's like not wanting to forget the fact that my body had forgotten what good sleep felt like and what happens to my cognition with it.

I'm not consistent, therefore most of the techniques I'd knew may as well the next day or even moment that I either forgotten or ineffective.
But most of these -- are outside the usage of alarms and written lists, if I can recall them, had little words or scrambled words to describe it. Any explanations I might have would have to be deciphered through some weird verbal metaphors I keep making up by myself.


_________________
Gained Number Post Count (1).
Lose Time (n).


Trogluddite
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Feb 2016
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,050
Location: Yorkshire, UK

07 May 2019, 3:09 pm

Excellent topic, Bea; it's one of the most important tools in the box, I think, though I don't pretend to be especially good at it! You've given some good practical examples, and magz has pointed out the advantages to mental health; and I'd add that it helps me socially too. I'm aware of what kind of situations I tend to misinterpret or over-react to, so that I can ask for a moment to think or calm down rather than just clumsily treading on everyone's toes. Emotionally, too, much of what's helped me with my Alexithymia is based on self-reflection, in part learned from a good counsellor. The biggest benefit of my autism diagnosis has been to gain a better understanding of exactly those things.

I would sound one little note of caution. I also think there are such things as "meta-procrastination" and "meta-rumination"! I do have to be careful that self-reflection itself doesn't become a rabbit-hole that my executive dysfunction leads me down. But that in no way diminishes the benefits.

You've made me think of the threads here where several interpretations of something are given, each held to be absolute, and often fiercely so, yet contradicting each other - precisely because the question was about something which may have several alternate explanations (e.g. "why did this person who none of you have ever met do X?"). Meta-recognising my tendency towards tunnel-vision and black-and-white thinking is one of the best insights I ever had. A bit more meta-cognition would do WP good too, I think!


_________________
When you are fighting an invisible monster, first throw a bucket of paint over it.


strings
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

Joined: 27 Jun 2016
Gender: Male
Posts: 227
Location: Texas

07 May 2019, 7:02 pm

BeaArthur wrote:
An example that just occurred in my life is I was waiting for my cup to come around to the front of the microwave. I do that because I'm in a wheelchair and need to be able to reach it easier (it's an under-cabinet type). When it comes near, I just open the door. Now I was thinking "While I wait for the cup, I could get my husband's lunchtime pills ready." Then I reconsidered, thinking "no, if I start to do that I'll forget about the coffee cup and it will get superhot. Better to wait." I was thinking about my own thinking process, namely my distractibility which would cause me to forget one task while doing a different one. Knowledge is power. I waited another 13 seconds for the cup to come around, took it out (at the perfect temperature) and then got the pills ready for my husband.


Interesting post.

On a silly point, I also like to catch the microwave when the cup comes round to the front. In mine, I timed it and found it takes almost exactly 10 seconds to go round once, so I always make sure to key in integer multiples of 10 seconds, and then the cup is always conveniently at the front when it stops. Maybe for yours you need to use integer multiples of 13 seconds...



BeaArthur
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Aug 2015
Posts: 4,998

07 May 2019, 7:19 pm

On my microwave, it takes quite a few more keystrokes to enter a number of seconds, than to just hit the "1" key which starts the cooking with a time of 1 minute.

Yes, I think mine also takes 10 seconds to go around, or maybe it was 20. But the first 10 seconds would not heat the coffee sufficiently, so that's where I came up with 13 seconds to the next revolution.


_________________
Back.


Pepe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2013
Age: 61
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,588
Location: Oz

07 May 2019, 7:45 pm

I was taught about "metacognition" about 40 years ago by a psychologist...
It was/is enlightening how your inner thoughts can affect your emotional stability/state...
You can actually (mentally) talk yourself into a negative state of mind without consciously realising it, as an example...


_________________
I like to flirt. Don't take it seriously. ;)

Down with big business!...Truth may be inconvenient but it is never politically incorrect...The Oracle of Truth has spoken...8)


blazingstar
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Nov 2017
Age: 66
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,739

07 May 2019, 7:53 pm

I didn't know it had a name, but yes, I use this tool frequently and it is essential for me to improve my life, my skills and reduce my frustration. Your examples are excellent and I do the same sort of things; I'm not as good at articulating them as you have been, so I will just let that be. In order to implement this thought process, I do have to slow myself down and stop and consider.


_________________
Eyes that watch the morning star
usually shine brighter,
Arms held out to dark they say,
usually hold tighter.


Threnody, Dorothy Parker
as modified by David Tamulovich


Pepe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2013
Age: 61
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,588
Location: Oz

07 May 2019, 7:58 pm

Twilightprincess wrote:
I’m very absentminded, so I need to write appointments down in my agenda immediately or I’ll forget to and miss the appointment.

In college, I had to write to do lists for every task to stay on track.


This is possibly the result of your executive function disorder, assuming you have it...
I have the same problem...
Took me forever to accept it rather than stay in a state of denial and think I could overcome the dysfunction through simply desire...

I use poster notes on the mirror or faucet in the bathroom and/or Google calendar...


_________________
I like to flirt. Don't take it seriously. ;)

Down with big business!...Truth may be inconvenient but it is never politically incorrect...The Oracle of Truth has spoken...8)


magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,507
Location: Poland

08 May 2019, 1:20 am

Pepe wrote:
Twilightprincess wrote:
I’m very absentminded, so I need to write appointments down in my agenda immediately or I’ll forget to and miss the appointment.

In college, I had to write to do lists for every task to stay on track.


This is possibly the result of your executive function disorder, assuming you have it...
I have the same problem...
Took me forever to accept it rather than stay in a state of denial and think I could overcome the dysfunction through simply desire...

I use poster notes on the mirror or faucet in the bathroom and/or Google calendar...

I use phone alarms. I have plenty of them, for when to start dressing to get the kids from the school, appointments, basically anything with a deadline.
I found out it reduced the stress I live in. I don't need to focus on remembering things, my phone remembers and it will beep.


_________________
Let's not confuse being normal with being mentally healthy.


Pepe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2013
Age: 61
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,588
Location: Oz

08 May 2019, 4:16 am

magz wrote:
Pepe wrote:
Twilightprincess wrote:
I’m very absentminded, so I need to write appointments down in my agenda immediately or I’ll forget to and miss the appointment.

In college, I had to write to do lists for every task to stay on track.


This is possibly the result of your executive function disorder, assuming you have it...
I have the same problem...
Took me forever to accept it rather than stay in a state of denial and think I could overcome the dysfunction through simply desire...

I use poster notes on the mirror or faucet in the bathroom and/or Google calendar...

I use phone alarms. I have plenty of them, for when to start dressing to get the kids from the school, appointments, basically anything with a deadline.
I found out it reduced the stress I live in. I don't need to focus on remembering things, my phone remembers and it will beep.


I forgot to mention that I have a couple of simple alarms...
In the kitchen area to remind me to turn off the potatoes cooking on the cooktop...
Upstairs I use one predominately to remind me when the news is starting, for example...

I never have the phone on, so that is out, but what you have inspired me to look into is to get a dedicated organiser... :wink:


_________________
I like to flirt. Don't take it seriously. ;)

Down with big business!...Truth may be inconvenient but it is never politically incorrect...The Oracle of Truth has spoken...8)


jifmam j jasond
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

Joined: 25 Apr 2019
Age: 64
Posts: 84
Location: prc

08 May 2019, 4:30 am

magz wrote:
Pepe wrote:
Twilightprincess wrote:
I’m very absentminded, so I need to write appointments down in my agenda immediately or I’ll forget to and miss the appointment.

In college, I had to write to do lists for every task to stay on track.


This is possibly the result of your executive function disorder, assuming you have it...
I have the same problem...
Took me forever to accept it rather than stay in a state of denial and think I could overcome the dysfunction through simply desire...

I use poster notes on the mirror or faucet in the bathroom and/or Google calendar...

I use phone alarms. I have plenty of them, for when to start dressing to get the kids from the school, appointments, basically anything with a deadline.
I found out it reduced the stress I live in. I don't need to focus on remembering things, my phone remembers and it will beep.


Problem, you say?
I have always thought that way. It is necessary to pilot my tendency to get triggered by this and that.
...
there is a wonderful Pulitzer prize winning book "Godel,Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid", by Douglass Hofstadter, which examines this phenomenon as Self-rep (or maybe its self-ref).
This a unique book, re-entrant and circular, and like a circle you can enter it at any point.
The index refers to an Isomorphic author named Digby. R. Eggheader, andd a book entitled "Copper, Silver, Gold, an Insoluble Metal Alloy". this is self rep because the self ref index entry defines the term Isomorphic. I find this deliciously cunning.
It Is a hard book, but as you read it, your mind expands -it makes you smarter. It took me ten readings, and for a glorious day, I understood it all.
For instance the MU puzzle, at the start, is a warm up. It is quite insoluble unless you JOOTS (Jump Out Of The System) then it is trivial. Observing the logic from outside,as it were, a bit like Bea's statement.
An example of how this book teaches you the tools to understand it right off, an example of self rep.
I think this gem of logic would be a special delight to certain autists. It is an example of what I call a "brain-stretcher".
I wholly recommend it. it is a book about itself .It will teach you how to think, how to think about thinking, the mind of an ants nest called Aunt Hillary, paradoxes and their care and feeding, and a thousand other concepts that you never suspected were there for the thinking. It will improve your toolbox.
you will never regret the time invested to understand it- though it took me most of a year.
...
Some books are important, Cod-dammit.



magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,507
Location: Poland

08 May 2019, 4:44 am

As I think of it, to me it's way more than being aware of my own thought processes. It's also about other aspects of how I function.
I'm clumsy. I often drop items. But I managed to train special ways of holding plates when washing them up so I don't drop them.
I have no sense of time. Clocks and alarms help me a lot. I love the timer option in my cooker.
I forget things. Routines and procedures help, I don't remember locking the door but I find the door locked and the keys in the right pocket of my trousers. I don't remember removing my jacket but I find it folded in my backpack.
And when I really forget something, I've learned to laugh at my absent-mindedness. That's enormous help, very easily underestimated.


_________________
Let's not confuse being normal with being mentally healthy.


Pepe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2013
Age: 61
Gender: Male
Posts: 7,588
Location: Oz

08 May 2019, 5:38 am

magz wrote:
I have no sense of time.

Time blindness


https://youtu.be/QZkdRnHv1WQ


_________________
I like to flirt. Don't take it seriously. ;)

Down with big business!...Truth may be inconvenient but it is never politically incorrect...The Oracle of Truth has spoken...8)


magz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Jun 2017
Age: 35
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,507
Location: Poland

08 May 2019, 6:05 am

Pepe wrote:
magz wrote:
I have no sense of time.

Time blindness


https://youtu.be/QZkdRnHv1WQ

No, in my case it's something totally different. I can plan ahead, anticipate the future and prepare for it.
I lack a sense that would tell me how much time have passed between given two events. In any scale - I don't know how much time I spent doing some task, when some past expirience occured or when to start moving my hand so it hits the moving ball at the right angle.
This is why I need timers for cooking.


_________________
Let's not confuse being normal with being mentally healthy.