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Spede
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26 Oct 2019, 12:26 pm

Can autistic individuals have poor working memory?



firemonkey
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26 Oct 2019, 12:36 pm

Spede wrote:
Can autistic individuals have poor working memory?



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism_and_working_memory


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2ukenkerl
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26 Oct 2019, 12:44 pm

Spede wrote:
Can autistic individuals have poor working memory?



I don't see why not. And I don't believe it is specifically excluded in the DSM. Mine is probably roughly average for 100% new things. Frankly I, like most of the world, would like it to be a LOT better. MAN, you reminded me of one of TWO people I heard of that was SUPPOSEDLY normal that has a memory like I would LOVE to have. I COULD do things like this before I was 8, but today I approximate dates, and most memories are like summarized. Anyway, I heard her daughter ALSO has this. I should have checked on the internet, but didn't. I found an interview, where she shows it off, apparently extemporaneously!! !! ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CPLGQq0ai_s

Of course some autistics, like tammet DO have a better memory. In his case, he has synesthesia that helps him.

I'm just diagnosing myself, but at least the DSM IV indicates it would have included people like me.



harry12345
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26 Oct 2019, 1:56 pm

Working memory is like the RAM of a computer - limited but useful for holding and retrieving "stuff" you are doing right now.

Your memory memory is like the HDD of a computer - much bigger, but harder to find stuff, but used to call up well worn routines.

I find that if I want to remember something it has to be in my long term memory - it becomes a routine called up from that memory storage.

If I've forgotten to do something it is usually because I've tried to hold it in my short term working memory and it has been erased by something else.



Spede
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26 Oct 2019, 3:18 pm

harry12345 wrote:
Working memory is like the RAM of a computer - limited but useful for holding and retrieving "stuff" you are doing right now.

Your memory memory is like the HDD of a computer - much bigger, but harder to find stuff, but used to call up well worn routines.

I find that if I want to remember something it has to be in my long term memory - it becomes a routine called up from that memory storage.

If I've forgotten to do something it is usually because I've tried to hold it in my short term working memory and it has been erased by something else.


That is exactly how my memory works too.



jimmy m
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26 Oct 2019, 5:33 pm

In the deepest portion of the sleep cycle called REM sleep, working memory is stored into long term memory. Generally if you cannot achieve REM sleep, the working short term memory is not stored and the information is lost. So adequate sleep is fairly important.



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26 Oct 2019, 6:23 pm

I have poor working memory, but have improved it somewhat by concentrating on it. In my work I sometimes have to copy long strings of numbers. There were two problems. First I could remember only three digits at a time. Second, I couldn't find the spot where I was last at. I found by concentrating on the digits for even a second I increased the number of digits I could remember at one time to five. I can also now focus on a long string of digits and "see" where I am, but I am not sure how I improved that.


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26 Oct 2019, 6:27 pm

I took the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function(BRIEF-A) test as part of my Autism Assessment. It showed substantial impairments in working memory as well as other areas of executive functioning.

I am grateful that my clinician emphasized this. It explained a lot and has helped me find coping methods.


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Last edited by ASPartOfMe on 26 Oct 2019, 6:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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26 Oct 2019, 6:36 pm

jimmy m wrote:
In the deepest portion of the sleep cycle called REM sleep, working memory is stored into long term memory. Generally if you cannot achieve REM sleep, the working short term memory is not stored and the information is lost. So adequate sleep is fairly important.


Interesting. Explains why when I have been in work and I have had anxiety and shutdowns... So during the night after work I find my mind is so active I hardly sleep.... And this must be why when I work the next shift it effects my short term memory. Makes complete sense.


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harry12345
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27 Oct 2019, 4:39 am

Mountain Goat wrote:
jimmy m wrote:
In the deepest portion of the sleep cycle called REM sleep, working memory is stored into long term memory. Generally if you cannot achieve REM sleep, the working short term memory is not stored and the information is lost. So adequate sleep is fairly important.


Interesting. Explains why when I have been in work and I have had anxiety and shutdowns... So during the night after work I find my mind is so active I hardly sleep.... And this must be why when I work the next shift it effects my short term memory. Makes complete sense.


When I have trouble sleeping I have a mental picture which I conjour up in my mind of my favourite place that I like to go to. I try and imagine I am there and usually I am asleep within seconds.

Another thing I do is try and get up at the same time every day and go to bed at the same time every day. Most importantly my alarm clock cannot be reached from my bed. I have to get out to switch it off.

You mention shifts - do you mean shift work? 6-2, 2-10, or constantly changing hours, or just your work shift, i.e. 8 hours?



firemonkey
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27 Oct 2019, 5:38 am

Memory via Cognifit .

Image


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Mountain Goat
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27 Oct 2019, 7:20 am

harry12345 wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
jimmy m wrote:
In the deepest portion of the sleep cycle called REM sleep, working memory is stored into long term memory. Generally if you cannot achieve REM sleep, the working short term memory is not stored and the information is lost. So adequate sleep is fairly important.


Interesting. Explains why when I have been in work and I have had anxiety and shutdowns... So during the night after work I find my mind is so active I hardly sleep.... And this must be why when I work the next shift it effects my short term memory. Makes complete sense.


When I have trouble sleeping I have a mental picture which I conjour up in my mind of my favourite place that I like to go to. I try and imagine I am there and usually I am asleep within seconds.

Another thing I do is try and get up at the same time every day and go to bed at the same time every day. Most importantly my alarm clock cannot be reached from my bed. I have to get out to switch it off.

You mention shifts - do you mean shift work? 6-2, 2-10, or constantly changing hours, or just your work shift, i.e. 8 hours?


That varied slightly on my last job... I can't work as I am as I know how effected I am at the moment through anxiety. I am shaking a little thinking about it. The people are great and the work was good. But for some reason I was getting so worked up...


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Benjamin the Donkey
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27 Oct 2019, 7:28 am

Poor working memory is one of my biggest executive functioning problems.


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jimmy m
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27 Oct 2019, 10:23 am

harry12345 wrote:
Another thing I do is try and get up at the same time every day and go to bed at the same time every day.


I found this to be very true based on my Fitbit Sleep Analysis. Whenever I went to bed 2 hours later than my normal time, it dramatically affected my ability to achieve REM and DEEP sleep. This occurred even when I slept later the next morning to make up the difference.