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quite an extreme
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13 Apr 2021, 6:26 pm

Dear_one wrote:
When I was young and scruffy looking, I could walk into an agricultural supply and buy a half gallon of nitric acid. I used it to clean metal. After a few trips, I got some Sulphuric, too, which would surely raise red flags now. Now, I can't get nitric anywhere, and another staple, Sodium Hydroxide, is also hard to find.

At least sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide are still no problem here. But you can't buy nitric acid here too.


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14 Apr 2021, 12:06 pm

Benjamin the Donkey wrote:
Very, in some ways. I was reading at university level at age 7. But I can't seem to manage to pay my bills or do other apparently simple tasks without help.


I can relate to this. I was a very early reader and was generally top of the class when at jnr school. From secondary school (11 years old) onwards though I found things harder and harder. I think there were just more thing going on around me, more distractions, more hormones, too much to think about at one time. I struggled through that school and didnt do very well in my final exams, partly due to having just found it all very tough and confusing and partly I wasnt coping very well with life at all at that time.

Now I would say i know a lot about the world, am a font of useless information, but in my day job I get embarrassed as it can take me a while to understand something new and I get jumbled up easily.

I find if I am interested in something then I will understand it in great detail, if I don't have an interest in something then I find even the basics quite confusing and it's like there is some kind of blocker in my brain.



y-pod
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15 Apr 2021, 4:11 am

I feel pretty smart. Got A's in whatever class I took, even as a middle-aged person I still beat those 18 year olds. I worked pretty hard, though. Maybe the kids just didn't bother to work as hard as I did. I don't know my exact IQ, but if I want to do something I know the result will be good. I admit that I might have unfair disadvantage over a lot of people when it comes to learning. It's my drug and I savored difficult projects and homework. Exams were the highlight of my life. I remember studying in labs until late at night, thinking what a jolly good time I was having. I think I was overloaded with dopamine when working hard or doing problem solving. :D


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15 Apr 2021, 11:50 am

y-pod wrote:
I feel pretty smart. Got A's in whatever class I took, even as a middle-aged person I still beat those 18 year olds. I worked pretty hard, though. Maybe the kids just didn't bother to work as hard as I did. I don't know my exact IQ, but if I want to do something I know the result will be good. I admit that I might have unfair disadvantage over a lot of people when it comes to learning. It's my drug and I savored difficult projects and homework. Exams were the highlight of my life. I remember studying in labs until late at night, thinking what a jolly good time I was having. I think I was overloaded with dopamine when working hard or doing problem solving. :D
OK. I'm jealous. Learning--in general--is not one of my "special interests", but it sounds like it is one of yours.

That would've been useful. I seldom enjoyed school (though occasionally there was something interesting). I enjoyed college more than schooling before that because I could take a bunch of classes in my major which did interest me.

In general, I just saw school as a prerequisite for a better future.


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firemonkey
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15 Apr 2021, 12:17 pm

Sod all common sense and crap at anything practical, but higher up the world genius directory list than these people:


Dr Eick Sternhagen Fields of education: Economy, Latin, ev. theology, Doctorate in Latin of late Middle Ages, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster – WWU, University of Münster, Germany.

Dr Manahel Thabet The youngest – and only – Arab with a PhD in Financial Engineering, she writes research papers on quantum mathematics. Her work to revolutionize our understanding of math and physics is poised to earn her a second PhD, at the age of 32.

Dr Donato Stolfa Nutritionist Biologist Specialized in Human Nutrition

Dr Jeremy Saget Weightless Flight Surgeon
ZeroG Instructor
United Nations rotary wing Aeromedical Evacuations Flight Surgeon

Dr Bishoy Goubran Bishoy Goubran, MD. Is a clinical researcher in the field of Behavioral and Cardiovascular medicine. Bishoy’s research line is in psychosomatic medicine

Dr Daniel Piersee Doctor of Pharmacy in Pharmacy @ University of Iowa

Dr Jawdat Wehbe Cardiologist - electrophysiologist · Heart and vessels


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Fenn
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18 Apr 2021, 2:26 pm

Firemonkey,
I liked your reply. You are open eyed about your challenges but willing to state frankly your successes.

I don't know why this kind of question (and related questions) seems so important to me.
Perhaps it is because I am so aware of my challenges and unsure of my successes.

I checked my files - in the year 2000 I had a full work up done which included a WISC-III IQ test. My "Full Scale" IQ was 127 (which is above average but not very exciting) but the Full Scale number is an average of all the subtest scores. I think in my last post I misquoted it as "a few points below 140" - in fact I should have said "a few points below 130". The WISC has a SD (Standard Deviation) of 15. According to this ( https://iqcertificate.org/iq-to-percentile-conversion ) that is a percentile of about 96. Some of my sub test scores where in the 98 and 99 percentile and one subtest score, the block design test, I got a "full score" which means I got every thing as right as it could be gotten - and the test wasn't sensitive enough to categorize me beyond that. I think that would be something like 99.9 percentile. Pulling down the Average (Full Scale IQ) percentile was some of my lower scores. The two lowest were 88 (21 percentile) on core perceptual motor skills and 104 ( 61 percentile ) for working memory. So to answer OP's original question "How Smart Are You?" At some things I am very smart and at some things I am very dumb - Depending on if you just look at my top two subtest scores or my bottom two subtest scores. If I could claim my top two subtests as my "real IQ" the percentile would work out to something in the 130s, 140s or 150s for a full scale score equivalent. But that is not really "a thing". The other observation I could make is that I really didn't have any "middling" subtest scores - just a bunch of high ones (99,98,91 pctiles) and a couple of low ones looking lonely on the other side of the bell curve. This kind of subtest score-spread specifically points to Executive Functions challenges - and that points to either ADHD or Autism or Both.
One unselfish reason to mention this in a post it in case anyone is working through a diagnosis with yourself or your school ages kids - you might see this and it can be ONE of the things that goes into a diagnosis. My two son's have similar subtest scores - but slightly different values for each subtest - this (to me) says it may be genetic and inheritable (whatever the cause). If you have a IQ test as part of the evaluation - look for this kind of subtest spread - it may be indicative.
In terms of "professional language" for different "how smart" ranges, this ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IQ_classification ) article is interesting and informative.


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18 Apr 2021, 3:19 pm

^ I should point out that my highest score is via a 'high range IQ test'. Tests done by people who have scored high on proctored tests and have a solid grounding in mathematics etc, but are not psychologists. They're aimed at those with 120+ IQs . A lot of traditionalists rubbish them because they're not made by psychologists.

These are via an educational consultant trained in psychometrics.

Image

My main EF deficits are with organising and planning.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Jon81
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19 Apr 2021, 2:19 pm

firemonkey wrote:
^ I should point out that my highest score is via a 'high range IQ test'. Tests done by people who have scored high on proctored tests and have a solid grounding in mathematics etc, but are not psychologists. They're aimed at those with 120+ IQs . A lot of traditionalists rubbish them because they're not made by psychologists.

These are via an educational consultant trained in psychometrics.

Image

My main EF deficits are with organising and planning.


Woohoo, that's some number firemonkey. Awesome.
Would you mind using your skills helping me out with these 3 questions? I don't really get the hang of them.

1. https://ibb.co/5YhCL4b

2. https://imgbb.com/nMDRVbW

3. https://imgbb.com/vY10NjN


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quite an extreme
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19 Apr 2021, 3:32 pm

Jon81 wrote:
Would you mind using your skills helping me out with these 3 questions? I don't really get the hang of them.

1. https://ibb.co/5YhCL4b

2. https://imgbb.com/nMDRVbW

3. https://imgbb.com/vY10NjN

1.c 2.f 3.e All kind of the same. Just compare the upper with the middle row.
Sometimes the same lines remain sometimes they are the ones that disappear in the third row.



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19 Apr 2021, 6:45 pm

^^ Anyone who has read my posts here knows that I have a spiky cognitive profile, with verbal IQ being significantly higher than non-verbal.

With non-verbal I'm better (not good) at what would be fairly simple pattern recognition( to a lot of you) than I am at mental rotation . I'd like to say the mental rotation deficit is down to having aphantasia, but the following article suggests not.

https://aphantasia.com/mental-rotation- ... qaUMlkASIw


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Jon81
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20 Apr 2021, 5:07 am

quite an extreme wrote:
Jon81 wrote:
Would you mind using your skills helping me out with these 3 questions? I don't really get the hang of them.

1. https://ibb.co/5YhCL4b

2. https://imgbb.com/nMDRVbW

3. https://imgbb.com/vY10NjN

1.c 2.f 3.e All kind of the same. Just compare the upper with the middle row.
Sometimes the same lines remain sometimes they are the ones that disappear in the third row.


Oooh ok thanks. That's it. You're really quick!
The third row only shows the lines that are not overlapping in row 1 and 2. It's a vertical take on this question. I was so stuck in my mindset of a horizontal solution. I was thinking it could be some kind of folding or weird movement. First time I've come across a horizontal question I think.
Normally I score somewhere around 125-130 on the tests I've taken that are free and seem serious. Done the Mensa pre-test for all scandinavian countries and show the same number, for what it's worth. I'm guessing the difference between me and you people with 150 is questions like these.
Can I come back with a few more that are bugging me?


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Jon81
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20 Apr 2021, 5:09 am

firemonkey wrote:
^^ Anyone who has read my posts here knows that I have a spiky cognitive profile, with verbal IQ being significantly higher than non-verbal.

With non-verbal I'm better (not good) at what would be fairly simple pattern recognition( to a lot of you) than I am at mental rotation . I'd like to say the mental rotation deficit is down to having aphantasia, but the following article suggests not.

https://aphantasia.com/mental-rotation- ... qaUMlkASIw


I will blame my supposed ADHD for missing that detail. What is a verbal test like?


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Du verkar ha både Aspie och neurotypiska drag


firemonkey
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20 Apr 2021, 10:33 am

Jon81 wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
^^ Anyone who has read my posts here knows that I have a spiky cognitive profile, with verbal IQ being significantly higher than non-verbal.

With non-verbal I'm better (not good) at what would be fairly simple pattern recognition( to a lot of you) than I am at mental rotation . I'd like to say the mental rotation deficit is down to having aphantasia, but the following article suggests not.

https://aphantasia.com/mental-rotation- ... qaUMlkASIw


I will blame my supposed ADHD for missing that detail. What is a verbal test like?


Here are some high range verbal tests. These will give you an idea.

https://ngtest.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/vra60.pdf
https://www.highrangeiqtests.com/testpdf/Lexiq.pdf


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Jon81
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20 Apr 2021, 12:57 pm

firemonkey wrote:
Jon81 wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
^^ Anyone who has read my posts here knows that I have a spiky cognitive profile, with verbal IQ being significantly higher than non-verbal.

With non-verbal I'm better (not good) at what would be fairly simple pattern recognition( to a lot of you) than I am at mental rotation . I'd like to say the mental rotation deficit is down to having aphantasia, but the following article suggests not.

https://aphantasia.com/mental-rotation- ... qaUMlkASIw


I will blame my supposed ADHD for missing that detail. What is a verbal test like?


Here are some high range verbal tests. These will give you an idea.

https://ngtest.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/vra60.pdf
https://www.highrangeiqtests.com/testpdf/Lexiq.pdf


Ok, this is hard as hell. I'd be awful at this. There's a slight language barrier here but even if I concentrate on the ones that don't require anything special language wise I feel really out of depth. The antonyms or synonyms makes me sick.

deleted 8)

Firemonkey, did I do ok? What should the answers be the way you see it?


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Last edited by Jon81 on 20 Apr 2021, 2:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

firemonkey
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20 Apr 2021, 1:57 pm

I've not tried that one. A request. Please delete your answers. It is frowned upon to discuss answers. Those examples were to give you an idea, not for public discussion . You are supposed to work out the answers yourself without help from another person but you can use sources like Google.

Same goes for spatial/non- verbal questions .


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 133 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 47 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Jon81
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20 Apr 2021, 2:59 pm

firemonkey wrote:
I've not tried that one. A request. Please delete your answers. It is frowned upon to discuss answers. Those examples were to give you an idea, not for public discussion . You are supposed to work out the answers yourself without help from another person but you can use sources like Google.

Same goes for spatial/non- verbal questions .

Understood!


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Din Aspie poäng: 102 av 200
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Du verkar ha både Aspie och neurotypiska drag