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Indecisivemoo1
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17 May 2021, 7:57 am

I began seeing a psychologist after a tragic event happened in my life around 3 years ago. I didnt go in trying to get any kind of diagnosis but within the first year of seeing him he diagnosed me with adhd-combined severe type. About 2 years later he told me that i have aspergers. I asked about it being an official diagnosis and he said it only matters if you are in school or medication but since it cant be medicated it doesnt matter. He has a lccps so he can evaluate and diagnose at his discretion where im located. Is there a reason why he didnt submit the diagnosis like he did for adhd? I had a psychiatrist tell me that he suspected i had aspergers but didnt tell me because it wouldnt matter due to there being no treatment for adults. I am just curious if its in my medical record now if he did write it down and how does a diagnosis become a diagnosis? Do they submit it to insurance or something? Does it cost money to slap a label on me? or .. My labels are adhd, ptsd, spectrum disorder he said because i asked. I was never tested at least to my knowledge. I know he specializes with adhd, asd, in kids and works with adults though so maybe he just knew after a while?



Indecisivemoo1
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17 May 2021, 9:37 am

why does this have 23 views but no responses? was my question wrong? 8O



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17 May 2021, 10:31 am

It might help folk if they had a better idea what national healthcare system you were under. And what is an "lccps"?


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17 May 2021, 10:43 am

Indecisivemoo1 wrote:
why does this have 23 views but no responses? was my question wrong?
Wrong?  No, not specifically wrong; but you are asking others to speculate on the actions, thoughts, and motives of someone whom they have never met.

Also the fact that you have asked not just one, but four questions introduces uncertainty as to what answer(s) you are actually seeking.


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17 May 2021, 10:52 am

To write a formal diagnosis, they need to show evidence of the testing protocol for DSM5 or ICD-10. Your report would need to provide all the testing data to support an objective, diagnostic impression. Perhaps if the doctor didn't do the proper testing on you, but rather made a subjective and educated opinion, they aren't comfortable or legally permitted to put it in writing. Whether or not services are available, you deserve to have your diagnosis in writing so you can read your own report, understand yourself, and share copies with your other doctors as needed. If this doctor isn't doing that, I'd ask one more time for them to clarify their reason for not creating a report.

I use my report for all sorts of things. I've given copies to my GP, my psychologist, my neuropsychiatrist, and even a few friends and family. I don't believe the line that there are "no services" available, which some doctors spout. You are still eligible to seek regular psychiatry, psychology, social work, and occupational therapy with or without a diagnosis. When you start treatment it's always nice to share a formal diagnosis because then it's incumbent on the provider to adjust their therapy for your specific needs. They don't have to say "Autism Specialist" on their door in order for them to provide quality services to a person based on their individual, developmental profile.



Indecisivemoo1
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17 May 2021, 11:45 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
To write a formal diagnosis, they need to show evidence of the testing protocol for DSM5 or ICD-10. Your report would need to provide all the testing data to support an objective, diagnostic impression. Perhaps if the doctor didn't do the proper testing on you, but rather made a subjective and educated opinion, they aren't comfortable or legally permitted to put it in writing. Whether or not services are available, you deserve to have your diagnosis in writing so you can read your own report, understand yourself, and share copies with your other doctors as needed. If this doctor isn't doing that, I'd ask one more time for them to clarify their reason for not creating a report.

I use my report for all sorts of things. I've given copies to my GP, my psychologist, my neuropsychiatrist, and even a few friends and family. I don't believe the line that there are "no services" available, which some doctors spout. You are still eligible to seek regular psychiatry, psychology, social work, and occupational therapy with or without a diagnosis. When you start treatment it's always nice to share a formal diagnosis because then it's incumbent on the provider to adjust their therapy for your specific needs. They don't have to say "Autism Specialist" on their door in order for them to provide quality services to a person based on their individual, developmental profile.



ah I am new to the psychologist thing. I dont even have written info about my adhd which i know i was officially diagnosed with because i recieve meds for it. as far as asking too many questions i have a hard time with communication so i end up not realizing how im communicating and that its difficult to answer me.. sorry guys. im in the usa here i guess i forget that ppl from all countries come here. and that not every health system uses the same acronyms. Im newish here. I just read others posts and this is the first time ive made my own topical thread. Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors - lpccs .. basically where im at someone with this title can diagnose and oversee the training of those who wish to. I am not exactly sure why i dont have a paper with diagnosis on it.. I feel like he gets mad if i ask and i dont know why but maybe im reading him wrong? idk .. He gave me a treatment plan and had like his initial eval of me on it but nothing specifially that said im on the spectrum . I guess im asking if psychologists keep private reports that are shared with medical records / health records/ insurance ? Basically the only way of knowing is to ask him but i dont want to becuase i dont want to make someone upset with me .. hes not mean i guess im just really timid . sorry guys . I was looking for a general answer about what is usual in diagnosing. He just specializes in those areas i only meant. obviously you cant tell me specifically why he hasnt or if he hasnt made it official.. i will need to ask him . sorry for the confusion everyone. im horrible at this. I just need to figue out the right question to ask to get the answer im looking for . ty



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17 May 2021, 11:53 am

No apologies needed. Take your time to ask what you need. I'm not American so I don't know about the billing codes or the files and private reports that a doctor might keep. Maybe someone here can fill you in?

I know how hard it is to speak up and inquire, especially to professionals. There's no shame in feeling timid. Is there a way you can email him, or ask his receptionist, or avoid asking him directly / verbally? I usually find that's helpful for me. I'm terrible with self-advocacy and verbal communication too.

Good luck and I hope someone here can help!



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17 May 2021, 2:39 pm

For me, a summary of the diagnosis directed to employers helped me get my employer to pay for therapy.
Then I gave the full diagnosis to the psychiatrist which saved a lot of time and effort, simply gave us a head start.
It may help me to get proper medication too (not for autism, but eg anxiety or depression).
All this may or may not apply to you, depending on nationality, company etc.

/Mats


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17 May 2021, 4:45 pm

Indecisivemoo1 wrote:
...He has a lccps...
Well. I'm disappointed. I was hoping you misspelled "hiccups"! That could've been an interesting explanation!

I'm also in the U.S. When I decided I wanted an Adult Autism Assessment I asked my insurance company and they were clueless. I initially received a verbal diagnosis from my psychologist but later received a written evaluation--which no one (other than my bride) has expressed interest in seeing (and, thinking back, I know she did read it but I can't guarantee how interested she was). For insurance purposes afterwards I just needed a bill that said an evaluation was performed and how much it cost, but not the final diagnosis.

The written evaluation identifies a number of standardized test instruments the psychologist applied, including ADOS. She did interview me but there were also written questionnaires.

I've since told my other medical practitioners about the diagnosis and they seem to believe me...but it is apparently on the honor system, none has asked for proof.

The U.S. uses DSM-V which does not include Asperger's Syndrome as a diagnosis. In 2013 Asperger's (in the DSM) was pulled under Autism Spectrum Disorder. My "official" diagnosis is:

Autism Spectrum Disorder, Level 1 (Mild)

My psychologist included comments in the report that I also displayed "many of the qualities of individuals diagnosed with high functioning ASD, or what was previously known as Asperger's Syndrome."

So far, the most important accommodation I've tried to get from my medical care providers is that I want stuff in writing. In the past, before I was diagnosed ASD-1, I was fortunate to have a Primary Care Physician who always gave me stuff in writing--I don't know if he did that just because I asked or because he did it with everyone. I've been asking my current medical providers for stuff in writing from before I was diagnosed ASD-1--they didn't do it before my diagnosis and don't do it now.

A resource I've found that looks useful to me but not even interesting to my medical providers is AASPIRE's healthcare toolkit, including this: document. Also, when asked to tell them my level of pain on a scale of 0-10 I was always frustrated because I didn't know how to do that correctly, so I find it useful to take along a comparative pain scale when I see doctors.

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17 May 2021, 4:54 pm

Are you sure your psychologist IS a psychologist? In the United States, you have to possess a Ph.D. or a Psy.D. in psychology in order to use the title. To my mind, a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor is a lower credential than a clinical psychologist, counseling psychologist, educational psychologist, rehabilitatioin psychologist, or neuropsychologist. All of those titles actually include the word psychologist. In most medical systems in the US, to diagnose autism you need to be either a psychologist or psychiatrist, and you need to do a quite involved assessment that often takes two or three days, uses a combination of history (back to childhood, if available), neuropsych tests, behavioral observations, questionnaires, and so forth.

I don't mean to undermine your faith in your so-called psychologist, but it really sounds to me that he is not adequately credentialed and trained to do an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. He seems unwilling (because not legally entitled) to do the full assessment for this diagnosis. (By contrast, depression is pretty easy to diagnose - a 20 item questionnaire and a few behavioral observations, for instance.) The result of the exhaustive assessment DOES yield a written report, often 8-10 pages long, listing the various instruments used to arrive at the diagnosis. The patient (or for a minor, the parent) gets a copy of this report, and it is shared with other medical professionals as necessary.

If my hunch about your provider is accurate, he's a little testy because he really isn't qualified to make the diagnosis and doesn't want to be forced to admit it. Either that, or he's qualified but too lazy to do the proper job.

Good luck as you work your way through this. I suggest you ask for a full assessment and written report.


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