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naturalplastic
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18 Aug 2021, 3:10 pm

League_Girl wrote:
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The third thing...Im a bit confused as to what youre talking about about school rules.


Because I was in a self contained classroom where rules were inconsistent because rules didn't always apply to a certain student. That was because each of us had a disability and our own scale and I wasn't the only kid in that class that was mimicking other students so it reinforced it in me. Also they didn't give us normal school work regular kids were learning at our age so I didn't know what I was missing out on at school.

One boy was allowed his own basketball and didn't have to share and he was allowed to shout the number 9 every time we did counting and the teacher would tell is "Don't do what Sammer is doing."

There was another boy who was allowed to run in the class exposing his penis to us and the teacher would always give him attention for it and then the rest of us started doing what he was doing so we can get the same attention and the teacher finally told us to no do what Joey does.

So I thought this was our teacher assigning special rules to each student and we each had our ability to have a rule we can each break and get away with while that rule applies to everyone else in class. So I would always test rules at school to see what special rule I had. To be fair lot of kids test their limits but I was doing this to figure out the rules and because I was confused. My mom blamed this on my issues about rules and me having troubles figuring our right from wrong if kids didn't set good examples for me about what are the rules and they always had to be enforced so I knew what the rules were. This is also what pushed me for an autism diagnoses in 6th grade.


But I get it now. Yeah...that would be confusing to my third grade self too. Its funny you tell this story because lots of things like that from my own childhood lately have drifted into my mind...how grownup assume you understand stuff that you dont. A midlife thing I guess.



League_Girl
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18 Aug 2021, 11:44 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
League_Girl wrote:
Quote:
The third thing...Im a bit confused as to what youre talking about about school rules.


Because I was in a self contained classroom where rules were inconsistent because rules didn't always apply to a certain student. That was because each of us had a disability and our own scale and I wasn't the only kid in that class that was mimicking other students so it reinforced it in me. Also they didn't give us normal school work regular kids were learning at our age so I didn't know what I was missing out on at school.

One boy was allowed his own basketball and didn't have to share and he was allowed to shout the number 9 every time we did counting and the teacher would tell is "Don't do what Sammer is doing."

There was another boy who was allowed to run in the class exposing his penis to us and the teacher would always give him attention for it and then the rest of us started doing what he was doing so we can get the same attention and the teacher finally told us to no do what Joey does.

So I thought this was our teacher assigning special rules to each student and we each had our ability to have a rule we can each break and get away with while that rule applies to everyone else in class. So I would always test rules at school to see what special rule I had. To be fair lot of kids test their limits but I was doing this to figure out the rules and because I was confused. My mom blamed this on my issues about rules and me having troubles figuring our right from wrong if kids didn't set good examples for me about what are the rules and they always had to be enforced so I knew what the rules were. This is also what pushed me for an autism diagnoses in 6th grade.


But your autism diagnosis was AFTER you were in this class? Why were put in a special class if you didnt yet have a autism diagnosis?


Language issues so the school district thought it would be best I was in that class and thought I wouldn't be able to function in a regular classroom setting. My parents not knowing they had rights too for my education thought they knew what they were doing and let it happen not knowing it would be difficult to get me out of that class once I am in.


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Erewhon
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19 Aug 2021, 3:07 am

Normal is a word from 6 letters.
Autism is a word from 6 letters.

Ergo, autism is normal :mrgreen:



SandWitch
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19 Aug 2021, 9:51 pm

Walking on my tippy-ties. It literally helps me balance my self from becoming dizzy.

I'm dangerously clumsy, having broken my wrist one, fracturing my wrist and fracturing my pinky toe..



Erewhon
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20 Aug 2021, 4:18 am

Lost_dragon
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20 Aug 2021, 4:30 pm

I assumed that most people had similar hearing to me. My hearing is hypersensitive. I used to assume that if I could hear a person that has regular hearing calling to me, they'd be able to hear me responding back at a similar volume. For instance, I have been in buildings where someone has called out to me a couple of rooms away and I've responded back, much to the confusion of everyone else in the room.

"What are you going on about?"

"I was responding to the person a couple of rooms away, she was asking a question"

"There's a person in there?"

"Uh, yeah? Obviously? Could you not hear her calling out?"

"I thought everyone else was downstairs?"

"They were, but there was an argument and she stormed off up the stairs and into that room, did you not hear any of that?"

"Did you?"

"Uh, yes, I thought you all heard that"

"No"


My ears have a weaker filter and I often hear background information such as this. I know I've had people ask me if I can "hear that" and I usually have to ask them to specify because I can hear quite a few sounds going on.

"Do you mean the buzz of the florescent lights? The ticking clock? How about the wind outside? The traffic on the road in the distance? Or the cracking sound of the old ceiling? The microwave? I can also hear a conversation going on outside between your neighbours about what the colour of the fence should be. Personally I'd go with the pale blue. Or is it the dog barking? There's also a wood pigeon, is it that?"

"Huh? I was on about the microwave I think, but you can hear all that? How do you get anything done?"

I'm just used to keeping tabs on things without even fully realising. Fully silent places creep me out. They feel wrong. I have a habit of accidentally eavesdropping and laughing at a joke from another conversation, much to the confusion of the people I'm in a conversation with.


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IsabellaLinton
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20 Aug 2021, 7:59 pm

I used to get offended or upset when anyone's house was different than mine. I think it's an example of wanting routine and consistency, rather than an indication I was judging anyone. For example, I had a little playmate who lived directly across the street from us. The first time I went in her house I was able to look out the front windows of her bedroom and see my own house. I got really distressed that her house was facing "the wrong way", since I was used to seeing HER house from our windows. It really messed with my mind and I had to go home. I still remember how confusing or stressful it was. I think it was the first time I realised that other perspectives or points-of-view existed, apart from my own. I was likely about five when this happened.

I also remember going to another girl's house and feeling overwhelmed because they had blue sofas. My dad always hated blue, and we didn't have any blue in our house. I was extremely distressed that the owners didn't follow our colour scheme (cream, gold, teal, bronze), because even my grandparents used those colours.

I was really shocked that other people had a different version of "normal".

I wanted to impress upon them that their house was "wrong", because it wasn't normal like mine.

I guess I was pretty egocentric but my family thrives on routine and predictability.



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20 Aug 2021, 8:25 pm

I used to think it was normal to keep a running count of how many times you have seen any given movie. It wasn't until I got made fun of for saying "I watched the Lion King for the 41st time yesterday" that I realized it wasn't normal.


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Erewhon
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21 Aug 2021, 2:04 am

Instead of using the term normal, i prefer to use the word 'average'. The reason for this is that normal is very similar to morality, and these 2 concepts are linked too much in my opinion by many people, unfairly in my opinion. I'm not the average, i try to be myself as much as possible.

I'd rather be happy than normal :)

When i'm cold i put on a coat, and to keep warm i don't take that coat off. In itself, this habit is not that strange you would probably think at first glance. But my experience is that for a lot of people it is something strange. When the majority of people come home on a cold winter's day, they close the front door, take off their coats, and turn on the heating. I don't do this, i do push the front door, but i keep my coat on when it's cold and don't turn on the heating. I don't do this because it's not necessary because i keep my coat on. A win-win situation. I don't have to take off my coat and i don't have to turn on the heating.
I have eyes, eyes that work very well themselves, so i can see that a lot of people don't do it that way. If it ever comes to talk i ask why are you doing that? Then i get answers along the lines of 'Everybody does that this way' or something like 'You look like a fool if you keep your coat on'
To keep the good peace, i do turn on the heating when i know someone is coming. And to keep the good peace, i sometimes take off my coat when i go somewhere. If it is very warm there, I certainly do this, but if i continue to feel comfortable with my jacket on, i sometimes keep my jacket on. I notice that it is often very irritating for the other person that i keep my coat on.



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21 Aug 2021, 2:20 am

^^ Maybe your walls should have pictures of the people riding the Graf Zeppelin. It was unheated, and they wore coats to dinner.
I wish I could find light, comfortable "indoor insulated coveralls." Garments from North Korea or northern China might be the closest approximation.



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23 Aug 2021, 2:59 pm

Peanut shells on the floor

I rarely go to a pub, and i also rarely go to the hectic city of Amsterdam. But a few years ago I was in a pub in Amsterdam with some people. We went to beer cafe Foeders, a very small cafe on the Ceintuurbaan, a side street of the Amstel. Although it is called a beer cafe they fortunately also had soft drinks for the undersigned. Upon entering this cafe, I immediately noticed a 'weird habit' for me. That cafe was littered with empty peanut shells on the floor. Walking in sounded like walking down a gravel path. At the bar and on every table there was a large jar of peanuts, which you got for free with the drinks. It turns out that it is tradition/normal and common in that cafe to throw the empty shells on the floor. In the context of live and let live, i have no problem with people doing this. I did not conform to this strange habit, i did enjoy the peanuts, by the way, and i put the shells "neatly" on the table like a molehill. I often make a mess of it too, but with me those things don't happen consciously, i make a mess of it unconsciously. Turns out i'm still a little civil/normal.

Image



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23 Aug 2021, 3:14 pm

^^ The raised piece of wood under an entrance door that you have to step over is called a "threshold" because it formerly retained the loose straw that served as a disposable carpet. Peanut shells make a good sweeping compound, and are sanitary. I used to work with a fellow who sat beside a mound of sunflower seed shells he had spit out.