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kokopelli
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20 Oct 2021, 7:23 pm

One time when I was a teen in Boy Scouts, we were going door to door selling something as a fund raiser.

We went out in pairs. One of my neighbors and I were working together.

At one house with a full yard encircling the house (unusual in that town), there was a dog that was acting very ferociously. The other guy didn't want to enter the yard. I stepped in and started off with a growling that scared the dog so bad he turned tail and ran into the back yard and hid. We never saw him again.

That really impressed my neighbor.

I'm pretty good with dog sounds, cat sounds, horse sounds, cattle sounds, mule sounds, peacock sounds, turkey sounds, and a few sounds that nothing makes. Not only playful sounds, but also scared sounds and ferocious sounds. It really surprised me to find out that other people couldn't do that.

Because I try to pet just about any dog I see, I have been bitten a few times.

I got bit one time a night or two before I headed off the college. The dog was some idiot's dog who liked to tease it a lot along with his friends and they made that dog dangerous. I found the town cop and told him about it and that he needed to keep an eye on the dog that bit me and if he died any time soon, to let me know. The general rule, as I understand it, is that if the animal is still alive in ten days, it can't have given you rabies when it bit you.

In high school, I got bit by a dog at one house about eight miles from mine. One kid who lived in the house grew up to be the father of a boy who married a niece of mine.

In addition to dogs, I've also been bit by a horse (that really hurts), cats, mice, and a snake.



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20 Oct 2021, 7:28 pm

i've been bitten by more dogs than i can count. they don't seem to care that much for me. i carry pepper spray when i have to be out and about in the neighborhood, some dogs are outright vicious just like their owners. i shot one charging big dog square in the face with a full blast of pepper spray but it just licked its chops like it was delicious. at least it slowed it down long enough for me to get away from the bastard. in my experience, dobermans, german shepherds, shelties and border collies are the worst biters and the most hostile.



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20 Oct 2021, 7:32 pm

I haven't gotten bit by a dog, not really I have had dogs I am playing with put their mouth on me but not actually go for a bite. One time when I was a teen, I ran into a bunch of aggressive seeming dogs when I was riding my bike to a park. Seems they had gotten out of their yard, so that was kind of scary but then another big dog came, maybe from another yard and stood in front of me and wouldn't let those dogs get close I was able to back up the street and the dog stayed near me till I was a safe distance away.

It is weird because I was threatened by dogs, but it was a dog who helped me get away from those aggressive, scary dogs.



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20 Oct 2021, 7:39 pm

^^^i think that dog was your guardian angel in disguise.



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21 Oct 2021, 5:22 am

I used to have a fear of dogs when I was a child, and because dogs can somehow sense fear they will go to you and jump up or something, which is the opposite of what a person (particularly a child) with a fear of dogs wants a dog to do.

One time when I was 11 I was walking home from school, and I used to pass this woman a lot walking 2 big dogs. But this one time she didn't have them on a lead (leash), and they charged over to me before she could stop them and they ran rings around me, barking and jumping up. They weren't aggressive or anything, but I was terrified and I just froze. The owner tried calling them but they wouldn't obey. Kids laughed at me as they walked by, I suppose I did look stupid standing stock still being attacked by dogs and not knowing what to do. Finally two kind girls who knew my brother came along and rescued me, which I was thankful for.
But after that I didn't want to go to school because I didn't want to pass the woman with the dogs. My mum told me that I can't not go to school just because of dogs, and she was right. I just hated dogs and it affected my childhood.

I'm not afraid of dogs any more though. Even when they bark loud I don't jump or get startled, and I just relax and pet them if they jump up. When I pass dogs in the street, they usually ignore me (or maybe just sniff my feet), which means I don't show any sort of fear at all.
I'm not really a dog person but I don't dislike dogs. I just prefer cats.


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Mountain Goat
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21 Oct 2021, 6:06 am

The first dog we had saved my life.

Growing up with dogs and one somehow does not get so many problems. It could be that one learns their body language and how to relate to them. The same thing goes with cats and other animals. For example, how many people approach goats is all wrong to a goat, as it is an invitation to fight them. A slight alteration of approach and it is an invitation to be their friend. If one has grown up with goats one will just walk up to any goat (If it is tame or semi tame) and it will accept you as one knows how they react and why, and what to do if they act up, and what to do to call them etc.

But going back to dogs. They will come up to you and be watching the way you react to try to work out if you are friendly or a threat. The dogs that do bite are the ones with the most fear that you are likely to do something and they want to dissable you from doing something before you get there. Some dogs will give their lives to protect their owners and their territory.
But if one approaches them in a friendly manner (Friendly to the dogs point of view) one is unlikely to get any trouble. It is all about the approach.
The issue with dogs is that they will run up and (Depending on the dog) show their teeth to any percieved threat and will expect you to react in ways that they know you are safe to them. (A dog is guarding its home and all the people that live there so to it, you are a possible threat unless you show to the dog that you are not).
I am not sure what I do different as I grew up around dogs so whatever I do it is automatic, but one thing I know that usually works and it helps to know the dogs name but not essential, is if the dog looks like it is coming up to you as if it thinks you are a threat, call it as if it is your best friend. Call it to you as if you are pleased to see it. Most of the time the dog will turn from a snarl to an excited wag of its tail and be excited about its new stranger coming its way.

The only breed of dog I have really ever had issues with were the miniature yorkshire terriers. Those dogs shake with fear and they will go for you. (Usually with an elderly owner who claims "She doesn't bite" as I raize my leg with the dog hanging off it by its teeth! Fortunately their teeth are too small to get through my trousers).. I was warned about other dogs while I was a postman, and some were big things but I did not have a problem apart from trying to get my fingers out of the letterboxes in time while the dogs chuckle away at the sight of my panic! HAHA! Wo said dogs did not have a sense of humour! :D

Oh yes, dogs have a sense of humour. Actually where my grandparents used to live and they had a miniture yorkshire terrier (Did not bite us as the dog knew us), and the dog would wait patiently inside the house where there was a ventilator, and this small vent would be at foot hight to the street outside. The dog would wait for someone to pass and suddenly bark, and the sound would be amplified through this vent, and we would watch people through the window leap into the air with the dog looking in delight as if to say "Hehe! I made another human jump!" The dog knew what it was doing! :D



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21 Oct 2021, 1:10 pm

auntblabby wrote:
i've been bitten by more dogs than i can count. they don't seem to care that much for me. i carry pepper spray when i have to be out and about in the neighborhood, some dogs are outright vicious just like their owners. i shot one charging big dog square in the face with a full blast of pepper spray but it just licked its chops like it was delicious. at least it slowed it down long enough for me to get away from the bastard. in my experience, dobermans, german shepherds, shelties and border collies are the worst biters and the most hostile.



My friend asked me to pop over to see her new dog about two years ago. The second I went into the house it ran up to me an bit my hand. It happened to be a sheltie not surprisingly. I call it a mini lassie since that first encounter because I know it winds her up to no end.



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21 Oct 2021, 1:13 pm

Mountain Goat wrote:
The first dog we had saved my life.

Growing up with dogs and one somehow does not get so many problems. It could be that one learns their body language and how to relate to them. The same thing goes with cats and other animals. For example, how many people approach goats is all wrong to a goat, as it is an invitation to fight them. A slight alteration of approach and it is an invitation to be their friend. If one has grown up with goats one will just walk up to any goat (If it is tame or semi tame) and it will accept you as one knows how they react and why, and what to do if they act up, and what to do to call them etc.

But going back to dogs. They will come up to you and be watching the way you react to try to work out if you are friendly or a threat. The dogs that do bite are the ones with the most fear that you are likely to do something and they want to dissable you from doing something before you get there. Some dogs will give their lives to protect their owners and their territory.
But if one approaches them in a friendly manner (Friendly to the dogs point of view) one is unlikely to get any trouble. It is all about the approach.
The issue with dogs is that they will run up and (Depending on the dog) show their teeth to any percieved threat and will expect you to react in ways that they know you are safe to them. (A dog is guarding its home and all the people that live there so to it, you are a possible threat unless you show to the dog that you are not).
I am not sure what I do different as I grew up around dogs so whatever I do it is automatic, but one thing I know that usually works and it helps to know the dogs name but not essential, is if the dog looks like it is coming up to you as if it thinks you are a threat, call it as if it is your best friend. Call it to you as if you are pleased to see it. Most of the time the dog will turn from a snarl to an excited wag of its tail and be excited about its new stranger coming its way.

The only breed of dog I have really ever had issues with were the miniature yorkshire terriers. Those dogs shake with fear and they will go for you. (Usually with an elderly owner who claims "She doesn't bite" as I raize my leg with the dog hanging off it by its teeth! Fortunately their teeth are too small to get through my trousers).. I was warned about other dogs while I was a postman, and some were big things but I did not have a problem apart from trying to get my fingers out of the letterboxes in time while the dogs chuckle away at the sight of my panic! HAHA! Wo said dogs did not have a sense of humour! :D

Oh yes, dogs have a sense of humour. Actually where my grandparents used to live and they had a miniture yorkshire terrier (Did not bite us as the dog knew us), and the dog would wait patiently inside the house where there was a ventilator, and this small vent would be at foot hight to the street outside. The dog would wait for someone to pass and suddenly bark, and the sound would be amplified through this vent, and we would watch people through the window leap into the air with the dog looking in delight as if to say "Hehe! I made another human jump!" The dog knew what it was doing! :D


The dog that but me most recently was protecting its owner. He was in a workshop and I was approaching the door and the dog just got up and latched on to my leg.

I've seen that same dog many times since and it acts aggressively towards anyone even remotely close to that workshop. I was driving out of the industrial estate in my car and it was still barking at me.



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21 Oct 2021, 1:15 pm

Joe90 wrote:
I've known a lot of dogs to randomly attack people for no reason. My friend went to her cousin's house, who had a dog, and for no reason the dog just went for my friend and she almost lost her hand. It's made her afraid of dogs ever since (she's NT). And I heard the same sort of thing happen to other people too. My boyfriend's niece has just had a new baby and they have a rather aggressive bulldog. I wouldn't let that anywhere near a helpless baby or a child.

These dog-lovers watch these programmes where cats are vicious to people, and they say ''uh, that's why I don't like cats'', but they forget that dogs can be just as bad, if not worse. I've heard of more cases of dogs attacking people and even killing children than I have heard of cats doing the same. Generally a cat will hiss or run away if they see a human as a threat, where as if a dog sees a (innocent) human as a threat they'd just go for you and they can be so strong it can be like a lion attacking you.

I wouldn't want to see any dog being harmed, and I do like some dogs and I know they're not all bad, but I still prefer cats.


My experience has been much different! :) I've been attacked by two cats in my lifetime (with no provocation), but I've never had a dog attack me. I prefer dogs as I can more easily read their body language and adjust my own to suit the situation/avoid conflict. I take no issue with cats, but at this point in my life I do not want one as a pet as they tend to have conflicting sleep schedules and make a huge mess with litter boxes. It must also be noted that I'm not a real fan of other people's pets in general and I prefer the company of my own :)


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Nades
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21 Oct 2021, 1:16 pm

Perhaps I just stink of dog food or something judging by everyone's posts. At least a Parrot said Hello to me today and another bird of some sort walked over to me and stuck his head between the bars for a stroke.

A sign I should get a bird? Those and cats seem to have no issue with me.



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21 Oct 2021, 1:17 pm

I was quite scared of dogs as a youngster. Still sort of scared of them these days.

I never was actually attacked by a dog----though I thought I was when I was about 11. Turned out the dog merely scratched me with his claws.

I never was attacked by a cat.



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21 Oct 2021, 1:32 pm

Nades wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
The first dog we had saved my life.

Growing up with dogs and one somehow does not get so many problems. It could be that one learns their body language and how to relate to them. The same thing goes with cats and other animals. For example, how many people approach goats is all wrong to a goat, as it is an invitation to fight them. A slight alteration of approach and it is an invitation to be their friend. If one has grown up with goats one will just walk up to any goat (If it is tame or semi tame) and it will accept you as one knows how they react and why, and what to do if they act up, and what to do to call them etc.

But going back to dogs. They will come up to you and be watching the way you react to try to work out if you are friendly or a threat. The dogs that do bite are the ones with the most fear that you are likely to do something and they want to dissable you from doing something before you get there. Some dogs will give their lives to protect their owners and their territory.
But if one approaches them in a friendly manner (Friendly to the dogs point of view) one is unlikely to get any trouble. It is all about the approach.
The issue with dogs is that they will run up and (Depending on the dog) show their teeth to any percieved threat and will expect you to react in ways that they know you are safe to them. (A dog is guarding its home and all the people that live there so to it, you are a possible threat unless you show to the dog that you are not).
I am not sure what I do different as I grew up around dogs so whatever I do it is automatic, but one thing I know that usually works and it helps to know the dogs name but not essential, is if the dog looks like it is coming up to you as if it thinks you are a threat, call it as if it is your best friend. Call it to you as if you are pleased to see it. Most of the time the dog will turn from a snarl to an excited wag of its tail and be excited about its new stranger coming its way.

The only breed of dog I have really ever had issues with were the miniature yorkshire terriers. Those dogs shake with fear and they will go for you. (Usually with an elderly owner who claims "She doesn't bite" as I raize my leg with the dog hanging off it by its teeth! Fortunately their teeth are too small to get through my trousers).. I was warned about other dogs while I was a postman, and some were big things but I did not have a problem apart from trying to get my fingers out of the letterboxes in time while the dogs chuckle away at the sight of my panic! HAHA! Wo said dogs did not have a sense of humour! :D

Oh yes, dogs have a sense of humour. Actually where my grandparents used to live and they had a miniture yorkshire terrier (Did not bite us as the dog knew us), and the dog would wait patiently inside the house where there was a ventilator, and this small vent would be at foot hight to the street outside. The dog would wait for someone to pass and suddenly bark, and the sound would be amplified through this vent, and we would watch people through the window leap into the air with the dog looking in delight as if to say "Hehe! I made another human jump!" The dog knew what it was doing! :D


The dog that but me most recently was protecting its owner. He was in a workshop and I was approaching the door and the dog just got up and latched on to my leg.

I've seen that same dog many times since and it acts aggressively towards anyone even remotely close to that workshop. I was driving out of the industrial estate in my car and it was still barking at me.


The barking is not an issue as nearly all dogs will bark. If the person is in business and they expects customers to call in then they need a suitable pen to keep the dog in because it is out of control. This is obvious as it was biting even though the owner is present so the owner knows it is not in control or it would not have done that.



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21 Oct 2021, 2:04 pm

A lot of these idiots who want to look hard and go around with a big dog are usually to blame, they train the dog to be aggressive and not good around anyone.

To be honest I'm starting to see a trend with dogs, it's usually the owners who just don't train them right at all and the owners usually an idiot that doesn't even know how to handle a dog properly so the dog becomes easily threatened.


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21 Oct 2021, 2:16 pm

Lunella wrote:
A lot of these idiots who want to look hard and go around with a big dog are usually to blame, they train the dog to be aggressive and not good around anyone.

To be honest I'm starting to see a trend with dogs, it's usually the owners who just don't train them right at all and the owners usually an idiot that doesn't even know how to handle a dog properly so the dog becomes easily threatened.


I think that the great majority of dogs are stuck in bad situations with people that understand them about as well as they understand us. Even when the owners are trying to be nice, they may well be traumatizing their pet. Professional dog trainers understand that 90% of their training has to go to the human without making it too obvious.



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21 Oct 2021, 2:36 pm

My dog, Whiskey, died about four years ago. He half Great Pyrenees and he was big.

Whiskey was the dumbest dog I've ever seen. Most dogs seem to learn to avoid porcupines after two or three encounters. Whiskey never did learn to avoid them. The only time I ever saw him bare his teeth was when I was trying to pull porcupine quills out of his mouth and nose.

I was talking to the vet one day and told him that Whiskey had finally denuded every porcupine in the area. He got a good laugh out of that.

Whiskey also wasn't bothered by skunks. It's a good thing that he was an outdoor dog.

Fortunately, he wasn't bothered by livestock.

We used to joke that if we had a burglar, Whiskey would help them load whatever they wanted.

Whiskey had a habit of walking up behind people and walking between their legs. He did that one day when I was peeing on a bush. As soon as his nose hit the stream of urine, he came to a dead stop and then backed up after a few seconds. That also seems to have cured him of that habit, at least with me.



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21 Oct 2021, 8:21 pm

Nades wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
i've been bitten by more dogs than i can count. they don't seem to care that much for me. i carry pepper spray when i have to be out and about in the neighborhood, some dogs are outright vicious just like their owners. i shot one charging big dog square in the face with a full blast of pepper spray but it just licked its chops like it was delicious. at least it slowed it down long enough for me to get away from the bastard. in my experience, dobermans, german shepherds, shelties and border collies are the worst biters and the most hostile.



My friend asked me to pop over to see her new dog about two years ago. The second I went into the house it ran up to me an bit my hand. It happened to be a sheltie not surprisingly. I call it a mini lassie since that first encounter because I know it winds her up to no end.

i read someplace that shelties come with either a ridge ["sagittal crest"] or a flat spot on their heads, the former are meaner. i don't know how true that is. but i do know that most of the shelties i've met were not friendly.