What is the worst thing a mental health worker can do?

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Earthbound_Alien
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15 Jun 2022, 12:13 am

Joe90 wrote:
Quote:
Autistics frequently tend to make literal misinterpretations


I know, I'm just letting people know so they understand. :wink:


no the nts get things wrong because they are caught up in foo foo land....'hey I added meaning thats not there and only exists in my head vill'....

there is no such thing as a literal misunderstanding...literal is literal! and that is that



Lady Strange
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15 Jun 2022, 7:48 am

shortfatbalduglyman wrote:
Lady Strange wrote:
Giving up on a patient. I had this happen to me at one of my lowest, and the therapist said she couldn't help me anymore. That did not help at all.


[quote="dear_one] Well, it is better than treating you badly. A professional should at least try to suggest a better source of help, though.[/quote]
_________________________________

Lady strange

Sometimes it is a good thing that a counselor knows and admits that they don't have the skills to address your situation

Plenty of counselors just assume that they know a lot more than they know, and then put on (smoke and mirrors) and it's a waste of cash and energy at best; & inflicting unnecessary additional damage at worst[/quote][/quote]





That is true.

ETA: Sorry about the quotes, can't get it to work right!



Jakki
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15 Jun 2022, 7:56 am

Lady Strange wrote:
shortfatbalduglyman wrote:
Lady Strange wrote:
Giving up on a patient. I had this happen to me at one of my lowest, and the therapist said she couldn't help me anymore. That did not help at all.


[quote="dear_one] Well, it is better than treating you badly. A professional should at least try to suggest a better source of help, though.[/quote]
_________________________________

Lady strange

Sometimes it is a good thing that a counselor knows and admits that they don't have the skills to address your situation

Plenty of counselors just assume that they know a lot more than they know, and then put on (smoke and mirrors) and it's a waste of cash and energy at best; & inflicting unnecessary additional damage at worst[/quote][/quote][/quote]




That is true.

ETA: Sorry about the quotes, can't get it to work right![/quote]


Can relate to the above posts …. But the topic kinda makes me sad, because of the reality of it . :|


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The_Znof
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15 Jun 2022, 1:46 pm

Dear_one wrote:
One of the worst is trying to rely on antidepressants. Drugs are tested by giving the new compound to a group of patients, and a placebo to a similar group, to see what changes for each group. If the control group is given the usual sugar pill, they can tell, and so they don't expect to change. If they are given any random drug that makes them feel strange, that will catalyze positive changes just as well. It is only the "bedside manner" that gives any potency to the antidepressants, but they are terribly addictive.


While I have had some good results with SSRIs and found the withdrawl tolerable [low dose effexor took a long time to get rid of the zaps but zoloft was easy], I suspect they may be neurotoxic.

Look at how much effort is spent on 'studying*' [sic] and shouting from the rooftops how MDMA and Methamphetamine damage your brain compared to how much effort is spent on the potential harms of SSRIs.

*a lot of the studies involve giving monkeys or rats HUGE IV doses of Meth and then neglecting to mention this when the media does its scaremongering. Abusing animals is the science.



Last edited by The_Znof on 15 Jun 2022, 2:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Dear_one
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15 Jun 2022, 2:01 pm

Never deal with a limited company without awareness that it is deliberately built with the morality of a psychopath, and the talents of many specialists to make it slick. To a drug company, the worst product is one that quickly cures a problem without causing any side effects. The ideal product would be one that causes strong addiction, and leads to a cascade of further prescriptions to mask the side effects, leaving the patient as a very long-lived vegetable. If they can't find a nasty solution, they use the relatively useful drugs to give the impression that they are all benign. Doctors and nurses live awash in their propaganda, and alternatives are forced out of practice.



shortfatbalduglyman
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16 Jun 2022, 11:23 am

Jakki wrote:
shortfatbalduglyman wrote:
One psychologist wrote "depression with delusions" or something like that on my record

Next appointment, I was like, "what are the delusions and when did they start"?

He was like is your thinking always accurate to reality?"

"No"

"What's an example of a time when your thinking was not accurate to reality?"

"Nobody thinking is always accurate to reality"

He put "depression without delusions" on the next report, but the previous report, he did not change. He did not apologize. The diagnosis matches the prescription. He did not say "thank you for helping me do my job better, even though you less educated and younger than me".

___________________________________


But that is not "the worst" thing he could have done


He could have raped, vandalized or exterminated my worthless corpse, but anyone could do that




___________________________________


(Maybe the OP is trying to ask "what is the worst thing a counselor could do, that nobody that is not a counselor could also do?")


The above post sounds very familiar to me . And infuriates me……

The above post by Hurtloam …..makes incredible sense to me ..! :)


_________________________________________________________________

Due to HIPAA, the counselor could get away with (almost) anything. The counselor is the one that maintains records. It is illegal for the client to take a tape recorder, so the client has zero physical evidence.

Some counselors acted like the answer to "how are you doing?" is "perfect" and all other answers are wrong, and the punishment for a wrong answer is 5150.

Plenty of times, counselors failed to hear what I said. Instead of grunting "huh" and "what" like they are the etiquette equivalent of "excuse me" (like most precious lil "people"), they just assumed that i said whatever they wanted me to say.

As a result, I was constantly paranoid that they would misunderstand or mishear something I said (even if I phrased it perfectly) and then call 5150, and it would not matter that I did not say what they claimed I said, because I have zero proof, and, of course, i am certain plenty of clients denied having said something. The cops are going to believe the counselor, not me.

Counselors could get away with doing anything they want, legal or illegal. Unless the client wins a civil lawsuit. Some lawsuits take two years. Some lawyers charge 600 bucks an hour. Outcome not guaranteed, even if you have the moral high road



Joe90
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16 Jun 2022, 12:04 pm

Quote:
Giving up on a patient. I had this happen to me at one of my lowest, and the therapist said she couldn't help me anymore. That did not help at all.


That's basically what happened to me.


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Dear_one
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16 Jun 2022, 12:07 pm

Related - I just read that many bullies tend to go into nursing. That would explain why I just get the run-around at my local hospital. I caught the head nurse in a mistake, and pointed it out. So, she sent me to another clinic with less time to get there than an ambulance needed, and got me on record as being late.
The same article noted the large numbers of people studying psychology to figure themselves out, not willing to try counselling for themselves. The ones who do grow have some talent, but it may only help very similar cases.



Aspie1
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16 Jun 2022, 9:30 pm

Dear_one wrote:
Related - I just read that many bullies tend to go into nursing. That would explain why I just get the run-around at my local hospital. I caught the head nurse in a mistake, and pointed it out. So, she sent me to another clinic with less time to get there than an ambulance needed, and got me on record as being late.

My experiences with nurses were positive for the most part. If anything, it's the pediatricians I despise. Not regular doctors who happen to treat a child patient, or the nurses assisting them, but actual pediatricians. Those are garbage! The ones I saw as a kid had rotten bedside manners: they always made a big fuss over how scared I looked, which got me in trouble at home later.

I fought back by withholding as many symptoms as I could. Otherwise, I fought tooth-and-nail on seeing male doctors. I felt more at ease with them: they were less likely to out my emotions to my parents, and thus were less likely to get me in trouble at home. They also knew how to talk to a boy without making him feel cowardly, suicidal, or both. Also, I was getting older, and became gun-shy about women examining me, even for non-gendered body parts. I don't really care today, as I know doctors have seen it all. But if I see a urologist, I'd want a male doctor no matter what! After all, no cis-gendered woman will ever understand what it's like to carry a set of dangling balls and a shaft!

If anything, I'd say bullies go into family therapy or pediatric medicine. It gives them the carte blanche to inflict pain on a kid, get him in trouble with his parents, watch him cry, then smugly pat themselves on the back for "doing it for his own good". Much like they themselves mocked troubled kids as children. Not to mention, most pediatricians and family therapists are women, and the Blue Pilled "women can do no wrong" mantra further gives them the proverbial angel halo, while enabling the devil spirit in them.



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16 Jun 2022, 10:52 pm

I'm just going to say as far as my experiences with far too many psychologists and psychiatrists, I've never had any problems outside of what I previously mentioned: the right questions sometimes weren't asked. I wasn't much a fan of psychologists as they tended to talk about those icky things, emotions and feelings, but they were useful to talk to about specific things that bothered me all the same, as things always come with emotions and feelings, so they're receptive to that.

I like psychiatrists when it comes to mental health stuff.



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17 Jun 2022, 1:17 am

lvpin wrote:
Wasn’t sure where to post this but basically, I work in a mental health recovery centre and am currently doing my training. However I was wondering if there was anything anyone here wanted to say about dos and donts when working with autistic people as a lot of the people who see us either are autistic or suspect that may be the case.

I only have my own experience as an autistic person so I’m curious to hear your takes.


Do they do ABA in your RC?



Marley77
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17 Jun 2022, 5:48 pm

Don’t assume patient is not suffering, just wants to get a SS check.

When working with a child keep in mind what you do can affect them for years (the rest of their life), try to make it positive not negative.

Hold yourself accountable to a higher power, because in reality you are accountable.



lvpin
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18 Jun 2022, 8:30 am

The_Znof wrote:
lvpin wrote:
Wasn’t sure where to post this but basically, I work in a mental health recovery centre and am currently doing my training. However I was wondering if there was anything anyone here wanted to say about dos and donts when working with autistic people as a lot of the people who see us either are autistic or suspect that may be the case.

I only have my own experience as an autistic person so I’m curious to hear your takes.


Do they do ABA in your RC?


No. We basically function as a place to separate from the stress of life. We do have some actual counsellors but a lot of us are just there as someone to chat too. We also direct people to other mental health services but, as an autistic person, I would never recommend ABA to anyone I work with.



lvpin
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18 Jun 2022, 8:32 am

Joe90 wrote:
The title of this thread is just a figure of speech. The OP is asking for guidelines or advice on what a mental health worker should and shouldn't do, and if anyone's got any unpleasant experiences with mental health workers.


Sorry for not making this clear! I spent ages thinking the title through and still messed it up :')



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18 Jun 2022, 8:37 am

Dear_one wrote:
One of the worst is trying to rely on antidepressants. Drugs are tested by giving the new compound to a group of patients, and a placebo to a similar group, to see what changes for each group. If the control group is given the usual sugar pill, they can tell, and so they don't expect to change. If they are given any random drug that makes them feel strange, that will catalyze positive changes just as well. It is only the "bedside manner" that gives any potency to the antidepressants, but they are terribly addictive.


Gotta disagree there. It's not just the placebo, especially as so many trials are randomised. The issue with this sort of medication is that we don't fully understand it but it does save lives and have an actual effect. They're getting better at that now and can do genetic tests to see which suits you better.

I feel quite strongly on the subject because I have people I love who would be locked up in a psych ward or dead without mental health medication. Sometimes you can't do anything but take medication to help. I've been mentally ill for years and it wasn't until I took medication that I even had the motivation to take better care of myself. It's not perfect and I still get depressed, but at least I don't constantly dream about ending my life and don't self harm every other day.



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18 Jun 2022, 8:38 am

I don’t believe you “messed it up.”

I believe it encourages people to speak of their bad experiences with therapists.