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miamihaze
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15 Jun 2022, 2:50 am

Uh, I'm not sure if this is the right forum to be posting in or if the jobs one would be, as I'm touching on both things? I'm new to the site but if I understood others well I think I can move posts to other forums so if I need to do that please inform me. I'm also sorry if this is already an existing conversation. I just need to talk about stuff for a bit.

So, I applied for a job and hours from now I'm going to be heading in for my interview for it. Which I'm excited for and I'm hoping to get the job! It was shockingly fast to schedule my interview compared to some I tried in the past. But even with all of the joy- have any of you ever just felt like you were.. too autistic for something?

Now let me explain what I mean. You can do whatever you want and be autistic but there are still struggles in areas that NTs just wouldn't fully understand. For me with this is the fact I am easily overwhelmed and scared over things, especially new ones like this. I need this job to start saving up to make a living for myself and to be happy on my own, I need to be self-reliant. It's my only choice, but it feels so overwhelming. It's not easy for me like it is NTs.

The idea of having to learn so much and fit in with a crowd I hardly understand stresses me out so much. I've never been in a work setting and I'm so reliant on other people half the time for guidance I'm scared I won't even be able to function when it comes to being on my own like this. It makes me feel so lost, so foggy in the head. My brain doesn't function the way it should and it shows how behind and slow I am compared to my peers. Does it make sense? I'm unsure.

By the time I'm working I'm sure I'll ease in and do alright but there's just so much going on, so many fears, and I can't fully vocalize them. I want to make this post but I feel I'm lacking so much information for you guys. I'm not necessarily looking for advice. Just if anyone else ever felt a similar way to this when it came to working on their own for the first time, especially in the fast food industry. I'm good with repetition and routine, but it's just so nervewrecking. There's so much new to me, so many new people, so much socialization, and the fact even with all my other overwhelming emotions I STILL need to go into work no matter what which might be a combination to cause a meltdown, PUBLICLY AT THAT. It's just a lot and I need to know I'm not alone and it'll be okay, y'know?


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temp1234
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15 Jun 2022, 3:20 am

Welcome! I think your thread fits both this sub-forum and the jobs sub-forum.

You should be ok as long as you are good at interacting with people, which I believe you are. Any unskilled workplace is full of gossipy, unhappy, nasty people, who are very willing to make other people's lives hell. You just need to have the interpersonal skills to get along with those bullies. As long as you can do that, all other things don't really matter that much. Even if you don't understand something, other people will help you. So, you shouldn't worry.



Where_am_I
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15 Jun 2022, 5:03 am

^ Your colleagues sound similar to the bullies at my workplace. Working from home permanently has been the best thing for me.

What helped me cope at my workplace (when I worked at the office) were accomodations such as:

* Breaks in a quiet room when I felt overwhelmed.
* Change of duties.
* Some decent colleagues that were happy to cover for me when I couldn't fulfill some of my duties (I returned the favour by helping them too whenever I could).

The socialising part was too much for me, as it's the first time I've worked at a place where everyone socialises so much. I tackled it by ensuring I took my breaks and lunch breaks alone. I didn't really care if it offended anyone.

So I would advise on workplace accomodations where possible.

And you're not alone, miamihaze, I can relate to a lot of what you've expressed. Best of luck with your interview!

Edit: Sorry, first reply didn't include useful advice


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Last edited by Where_am_I on 15 Jun 2022, 7:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

kraftiekortie
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15 Jun 2022, 6:11 am

You’ll probably be hired.

Are you going to college, too?

Many times, the manager will help you coordinate your work and school schedule.

Excellent advice above. Want to add that I hope you graduate college so you could have a good shot at a job more suited for autistic folks.



SpiralingCrow
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15 Jun 2022, 6:47 am

I've had such fears when starting new endeavors too. I usually find the anticipation leading up tends to be worse than the actual doing. I can get myself worked up pretty good ahead of time.



Lady Strange
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15 Jun 2022, 7:39 am

Yes it can be a rough transition sometimes, but you do eventually tend to adjust. It can feel overwhelming for the first while, you just have to kind of ride it out. Eventually the tasks will become more automatic to your brain and it gets easier. Dealing with people can be difficult, but just try to not let the catty gossipy types get to you.



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15 Jun 2022, 8:02 am

I used to try to be perfect for a job. Then, I got more into looking for a job that was perfect for me. Whether it works out this time or not, you gain experience. I knew a guy who moved to the city from a farm, and had no job skills. He looked in the want ads, and saw more demand for printers than any other job. So, he started applying as "an experienced printer." The first place, he barely got to see one of the machines, but soon he learned to load paper, and last an hour or so. After over a dozen tries, he found a place where the other press men, who had been covering an extra machine, were willing to teach him all he needed to stay.
I was in a similar situation, but decided that I could do anything as a handyman, and just headed for the biggest clump of apartments near my house. I asked some gardeners if they needed help, and they took me down to an unmarked shop for appliance repairmen. They had needed someone for a month, and their boss had made the ad look so formidable that I had not applied. I had also never done appliances, but they assured me that they could teach me in a day, and they did.



arachnids
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15 Jun 2022, 11:48 am

I think work is an autistic person's biggest challenge. All the autistic people I talk to say that they find work related issues the hardest thing. I think governments should top up our incomes so we can work part time, but not be disadvantaged by doing that and still be able to support ourselves and have a quality of life. Being stuck on disability isn't good, but working full time can often be worse. We kind of stagger along until our 40s or 50s then burn out.

We have a lot to offer, but we need support.


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15 Jun 2022, 3:35 pm

Welcome to WP!

I hope the job interview goes/went well and that whether it is this one or another you end up with a good job.

And, yes, finding a new job and having a new job are very stressful. Take a gentle sense of humor with you and concentrate more on watching and listening than on talking. (Doing the job well is also very good!)


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