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Kitty4670
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09 Sep 2022, 9:40 pm

Does Aspie have very high IQ? Is IQ mean knowing things.


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timf
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10 Sep 2022, 6:37 am

IQ is a measurement of a number of different mental processes. Memory is integral to several of them. One would expect that a better memory would produce (among other things) the ability to recall much of what one has heard or read, thus "knowing things".

I suspect that Aspergers is a neurological variation resulting in a more complex, faster, or sensitive neurology. One might expect that some of the variations could also manifest in mental processes that would score higher on IQ measurements.



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10 Sep 2022, 7:50 am

To an extent people with Asperger's are smarter than the average NT. This is because to be diagnosed with Asperger's, low IQ needs to be excluded which bumps up the average.

Likewise, people with low functioning autism on average have a much lower IQ as the diagnostic criteria is explicit about excluding average and high IQ people from being diagnosed, pushing the average IQ down.



CockneyRebel
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10 Sep 2022, 8:22 am

I'm not sure what my IQ is. That does make a lot of sense, though. Every aspie that I've seen has come across to me as being extremely smart.


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ToughDiamond
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10 Sep 2022, 9:41 am

I've read that Aspies often score strangely on IQ tests, doing very well on some parts of the test but very badly on other parts. So the final IQ number tends to be rather meaningless. Personally I've never seen much use for a test that tries to measure a person's overall mental horse-power. I don't think it's helpful to reduce such a complex thing to a single number. I see merit in testing individual aptitudes and leaving it at that. The other problem with combining them all into a single number is, how do they decide which aptitudes are the most important? The importance of aptitudes isn't an absolute thing. It depends on the environment the individual happens to be in, and the environment can be different in different places and at different times.



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10 Sep 2022, 6:49 pm

ToughDiamond wrote:
I've read that Aspies often score strangely on IQ tests, doing very well on some parts of the test but very badly on other parts. So the final IQ number tends to be rather meaningless. Personally I've never seen much use for a test that tries to measure a person's overall mental horse-power. I don't think it's helpful to reduce such a complex thing to a single number. I see merit in testing individual aptitudes and leaving it at that. The other problem with combining them all into a single number is, how do they decide which aptitudes are the most important? The importance of aptitudes isn't an absolute thing. It depends on the environment the individual happens to be in, and the environment can be different in different places and at different times.


It was the same with me. My IQ test was full of spikes and troughs. They had to give me a general ability index instead to even it out.

The troughs sadly do their dirty work on me and knock my off my stride. If I performed more consistently I would have much clearer patterns of though.



Kitty4670
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10 Sep 2022, 10:21 pm

I don’t think I ever took an IQ test. I was more smarter when I was younger, I was more creative, in high school my senior year, I wrote children stories & started writing poems. I also have Learning Disability, that makes it alot harder for me.


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11 Sep 2022, 3:20 am

I'm a mix of near genius and utter fool.



CanadianMagpie
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11 Sep 2022, 5:39 am

As other people have replied, I generally am very intelligent but some things that NTs think are "common sense" can be weirdly difficult for me. Like autism, I think intelligence is more of a spectrum than a single score.



Kitty4670
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11 Sep 2022, 8:23 pm

CanadianMagpie wrote:
As other people have replied, I generally am very intelligent but some things that NTs think are "common sense" can be weirdly difficult for me. Like autism, I think intelligence is more of a spectrum than a single score.

Common sense is difficult for me too.


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Muse933277
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11 Sep 2022, 11:52 pm

Depends on the person with autism. Although I will say that just because someone has a high IQ doesn't mean they will be more successful in life.

For example, I know several guys with autism who I would say are above average intelligence. One of them was incredibly good at coding and could pick it up really fast. The problem was that he has selective mutism, to the point where he doesn't talk to anybody at all, so as a result, he works a part time low paying job when he's capable of much more. The other guy looked like your stereotypical nerd who was also fairly bright, but was lazy. He's 32 years old, still lives with his mom and dad, and has a low paying internship.

I would say what is a better predictor of how successful someone with autism will become, is their ability to adapt to the neurotypical world, and perhaps some ambition as well. Although you do need at least some intelligence to be capable of that feat, so I would say as long as you're at least average intelligence. Someone who is clearly intellectually delayed might struggle with being independent.



Radish
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12 Sep 2022, 9:23 am

Kitty4670 wrote:
CanadianMagpie wrote:
As other people have replied, I generally am very intelligent but some things that NTs think are "common sense" can be weirdly difficult for me. Like autism, I think intelligence is more of a spectrum than a single score.

Common sense is difficult for me too.


Ditto that. I have a very high IQ as measured by MENSA but a very low EQ. This means I'm good with puzzles, technical stuff, science and computers but absolutely lousy dealing with people, personal issues or managing my life.


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firemonkey
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12 Sep 2022, 11:07 am

Common sense= very low, practical skills- very low, social skills-very poor.



CockneyRebel
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13 Sep 2022, 7:54 pm

I've taken a free online IQ test and I scored 86. Does it bother me? Not really, because that's what I was expecting.


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