how do we all deal with aging, as spectrumites or otherwise

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how do we all deal with aging?
i just grin and bear it :| 24%  24%  [ 7 ]
i age gracefully :D 34%  34%  [ 10 ]
i dunno. :shrug: 24%  24%  [ 7 ]
where's my ice cream? :chef: 17%  17%  [ 5 ]
Total votes : 29

auntblabby
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01 Nov 2023, 4:28 pm

^^perhaps due to a combo of poor diet [comfort food] and accident-prone-ness?



Lorikeet
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01 Nov 2023, 5:01 pm

I try to eat well and get some gentle exercise. I find walking the best to keep my body feeling good. Unfortunately in summer it’s hard to walk as it gets too hot. Looking forward to cooler months so I can start again.



DirkGently69
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01 Nov 2023, 5:30 pm

I’m type two diabetic, so I try not to intake too much sugar, and I’m monitoring my portion size too at the moment. Also discovered I’m lactose intolerant, so just started using lactose free milk, and I feel a lot better. I like walking as my exercise, but like Lorikeet says, it gets hot here in Aus, so I go early morning. I have trouble knowing/feeling what my age is. I just know as I get older I can’t physically do the things I used to.



ToughDiamond
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02 Nov 2023, 9:43 am

blitzkrieg wrote:
I read somewhere that autistic folk have a lesser life expectancy than NT's do, sometimes to the effect of a decade or two decades shorter. I am not sure how true that is, but it sounds a bit daunting.

I've read that too. I don't worry about it. It's only a statistical thing, and the individual may well buck the trend. And I doubt the Aspie body has an intrinsically shorter shelf life. The statistic would include suicides and deaths due to unhealthy living. So if you're really scared of dying, you'll avoid that kind of behaviour.

But here's a scientific study that's probably a lot better than my glib guess:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6713622/



Double Retired
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02 Nov 2023, 12:56 pm

I only recently stumbled across this possible Autism effect:

"Change of heart and mind: Autism’s ties to cardiac defects"

Quote:
Congenital heart malformations used to be a death sentence for many newborns. But as medical care and surgeries have improved, most infants born with heart defects — nearly 1 in 100 babies in the United States — live to adulthood. As they do, another matter has come to light: As many as half of people with congenital heart disease (CHD) have neurodevelopmental issues such as autism.

Having CHD may raise the chances of being diagnosed with autism by anywhere from about one-third to sixfold, according to estimates from the past five years; A 2023 meta-analysis of all previous studies pegged the increased likelihood at twofold.

Many children with CHD also have some traits that resemble autism but don’t merit a diagnosis, such as problems with theory of mind and executive function, which includes working memory, cognitive flexibility, planning and self-regulation. “There’s also the question of what do we do with everything that lies in between,” says Johanna Calderon, chair in neurodevelopment at the University of Montpellier in France and lead scientist of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Team at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research.

Scientists used to think that these neurodevelopmental issues stemmed from the life-saving surgeries that infants with CHD typically undergo. Techniques such as deep hypothermia to achieve circulatory arrest and circulating the blood externally were thought to damage the brain by reducing blood flow to it or causing blood clots.

But as it turns out, factors related to heart surgery account for only 5 to 8 percent of differences in neurodevelopmental issues among people with CHD, according to a 2019 review. And milder heart defects are more strongly linked to autism than severe ones, another 2019 study showed. What’s more, many children with CHD show signs of atypical brain development before they even enter the operating room.
This is near and dear to my heart :roll: because in 2012 (when I was 59) an angiogram identified a defect in my heart which I have since been told was probably congenital. In 2020 I had nontrivial surgery to "repair" it. If the defect had not been detected and "repaired" I was progressing toward an aortic aneurysm...which could've been very inconvenient.


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ToughDiamond
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02 Nov 2023, 6:08 pm

Double Retired wrote:
I only recently stumbled across this possible Autism effect:

"Change of heart and mind: Autism’s ties to cardiac defects"
Quote:
Congenital heart malformations used to be a death sentence for many newborns. But as medical care and surgeries have improved, most infants born with heart defects — nearly 1 in 100 babies in the United States — live to adulthood. As they do, another matter has come to light: As many as half of people with congenital heart disease (CHD) have neurodevelopmental issues such as autism.

Having CHD may raise the chances of being diagnosed with autism by anywhere from about one-third to sixfold, according to estimates from the past five years; A 2023 meta-analysis of all previous studies pegged the increased likelihood at twofold.

Many children with CHD also have some traits that resemble autism but don’t merit a diagnosis, such as problems with theory of mind and executive function, which includes working memory, cognitive flexibility, planning and self-regulation. “There’s also the question of what do we do with everything that lies in between,” says Johanna Calderon, chair in neurodevelopment at the University of Montpellier in France and lead scientist of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Team at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research.

Scientists used to think that these neurodevelopmental issues stemmed from the life-saving surgeries that infants with CHD typically undergo. Techniques such as deep hypothermia to achieve circulatory arrest and circulating the blood externally were thought to damage the brain by reducing blood flow to it or causing blood clots.

But as it turns out, factors related to heart surgery account for only 5 to 8 percent of differences in neurodevelopmental issues among people with CHD, according to a 2019 review. And milder heart defects are more strongly linked to autism than severe ones, another 2019 study showed. What’s more, many children with CHD show signs of atypical brain development before they even enter the operating room.
This is near and dear to my heart :roll: because in 2012 (when I was 59) an angiogram identified a defect in my heart which I have since been told was probably congenital. In 2020 I had nontrivial surgery to "repair" it. If the defect had not been detected and "repaired" I was progressing toward an aortic aneurysm...which could've been very inconvenient.

Oh s**t. My father (very likely Aspie) died of sudden unexpected heart failure at the age of 75. Did you have any symptoms?



Double Retired
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02 Nov 2023, 9:03 pm

ToughDiamond wrote:
Oh s**t. My father (very likely Aspie) died of sudden unexpected heart failure at the age of 75. Did you have any symptoms?
From the congenital heart problem? I'm not sure. I was always OK at lower levels of physical exertion but I could not do the same extreme exertion as the other kids.

Eventually I was stuck at a lower energy level. I felt fine but I could not increase my exertion level.

Then they operated to repair my heart valve. I guess I feel like I have more energy than before. But I still feel like someone in their late 60s who never did heavy exercise.


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Redpaws
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03 Nov 2023, 6:01 am

I don't age. I level up! 8)


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ToughDiamond
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03 Nov 2023, 9:04 am

Double Retired wrote:
ToughDiamond wrote:
Oh s**t. My father (very likely Aspie) died of sudden unexpected heart failure at the age of 75. Did you have any symptoms?
From the congenital heart problem? I'm not sure. I was always OK at lower levels of physical exertion but I could not do the same extreme exertion as the other kids.

Eventually I was stuck at a lower energy level. I felt fine but I could not increase my exertion level.

Then they operated to repair my heart valve. I guess I feel like I have more energy than before. But I still feel like someone in their late 60s who never did heavy exercise.

Yes I meant from the congenital heart problem. Dad appeared to have no symptoms, and did a lot of hard physical labour during his life. Whether or not he had any warning signs towards the end, it's hard to know, as he was very stoical and proud of his physical fitness. He was in a sense lucky to die so suddenly. I've always dreaded a slow, lingering death under fluorescent lights in a big, "heartless" hospital (excuse the pun).



BTDT
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03 Nov 2023, 9:09 am

ToughDiamond wrote:
I've always dreaded a slow, lingering death under fluorescent lights in a big, "heartless" hospital (excuse the pun).


There are ways of avoiding that. You can sign advanced directives to limit care.
You can also elect the Hospice care route and skip expensive medical procedures.

The Medicare Hospice benefits pretty much cover everything. Something to consider if you have an estate to leave to your loved ones.



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03 Nov 2023, 9:41 am

BTDT wrote:
ToughDiamond wrote:
I've always dreaded a slow, lingering death under fluorescent lights in a big, "heartless" hospital (excuse the pun).


There are ways of avoiding that. You can sign advanced directives to limit care.
You can also elect the Hospice care route and skip expensive medical procedures.

The Medicare Hospice benefits pretty much cover everything. Something to consider if you have an estate to leave to your loved ones.

Thanks. As a recent Green Card holder I've been able to dodge health insurance until now, and got away very nicely with zero cost and zero healthcare, but apparently Uncle Sam will soon be taxing me bigtime anyway if I don't get involved, so Mrs ToughDiamond and I are about to look into these matters in depth. It's even more complicated than normal, as I'm a UK citizen, entitled to (what's left of) free NHS healthcare if I can arrange to be in England if and when I need it. You wouldn't believe how simple these things used to be for a grounded Briton, compared with the current situation. Didn't even have to know about finance, taxes, forms, etc. as they did it all for me. Quite a come-down. :(



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06 Nov 2023, 2:38 pm

I wouldn't mind dying young. Then I would never have to worry about aging and any related diseases to it and illnesses and medical issues and limitations.


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auntblabby
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06 Nov 2023, 3:12 pm

problem with dying you is you miss out on the wisdom that only comes with age.



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06 Nov 2023, 3:23 pm

Be careful. When I had my heart valve "repair" surgery there were complications. Depending upon my advance directives they might've let me die. Fortunately I made it very clear I wanted to live.

Ultimately they opened my chest up and went in again.

They were able to correct the problem. I was unconscious 32 hours rather than the planned 8 hours but I had been knocked out so when they finally woke me up things were going fine.

My bride, however, had had a very bad 32 hours.

I'm quite happy to be still alive. Retirement is wonderful!


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ToughDiamond
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07 Nov 2023, 12:31 am

Double Retired wrote:
My bride, however, had had a very bad 32 hours.

Yes, even if we die painlessly in our sleep, there's the matter of those we leave behind. It's particularly awful for old, bereaved partners. Some of them never recover from the loss.



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08 Nov 2023, 10:24 pm

ToughDiamond wrote:
Double Retired wrote:
My bride, however, had had a very bad 32 hours.

Yes, even if we die painlessly in our sleep, there's the matter of those we leave behind. It's particularly awful for old, bereaved partners. Some of them never recover from the loss.


^^^^ THIS ^^^^. .... 8O ...seriously agreed ..


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