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JustaDude
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16 Apr 2024, 6:30 pm

I was recently diagnosed with level 2 autism and combined type ADHD. I had researched autism for several years before I felt the need to be tested. I'm still wrapping my head around what it means for me in life and how it has gotten me this point.

At times, I am feeling regressed — like tasks that I used to do without thought seem hard or undoable. I'm pretty sure that I started having an autistic burnout a few months back. I am having breakdowns every now and then which usually come out of nowhere. I want to rest, but feel guilty for not doing more in life besides the chores I am able to take care of.

I know it is pretty subjective, but how long has everyone else's burnouts taken to reset?



IsabellaLinton
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16 Apr 2024, 7:59 pm

Hi and welcome to WP.
Congrats on getting the answer to your diagnostic question even if it's been causing you some stress.

My own burnouts are hard to quantify. My biggest one came over ten years ago when I left work on permanent disability because I just couldn't function anymore. Truth be told, I couldn't function for years prior but I had young children and no choice but to work during those years. Since leaving my job I've been in a continuous major burnout which hasn't stopped. That means I don't have the energy to be social or to function in society. I don't think this one will ever end.

On a smaller scale I have "mini burnouts" within the big one described above. When those happen it means I can't even function in my own house doing "nothing". I can't cook or clean or practise self-care. I can't see my partner or even read a book. Everything is too much. Those ones range in length from a few days to a few weeks or months.


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bee33
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16 Apr 2024, 10:53 pm

JustaDude wrote:
I want to rest, but feel guilty for not doing more in life besides the chores I am able to take care of.
It sounds like this is a part that you can work on. Acknowledge that you need rest and that you don't need to be doing more than you can handle. Your burnout will probably not resolve without rest, or it will at least be more difficult to get past.



ToughDiamond
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16 Apr 2024, 11:14 pm

Does the chronology of suspecting ASD, getting diagnosed, and experiencing burnouts support the notion that the knowledge of having ASD is having a debilitating psychological effect on you? Just a thought. I experienced a certain loss of social confidence from finding out I had ASD. It took a while to get over. But I may be barking up the wrong tree here.

I agree that it'd be good to try and take it easy.



JustaDude
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18 Apr 2024, 7:56 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
My own burnouts are hard to quantify. My biggest one came over ten years ago when I left work on permanent disability because I just couldn't function anymore. Truth be told, I couldn't function for years prior but I had young children and no choice but to work during those years. Since leaving my job I've been in a continuous major burnout which hasn't stopped. That means I don't have the energy to be social or to function in society. I don't think this one will ever end.


This is what I fear. It feels like the stress of the pandemic tipped me over the edge. I have had burnouts in the past over holidays, but what I'm feeling now is much more intense and has lasted much longer.

bee33 wrote:
Your burnout will probably not resolve without rest, or it will at least be more difficult to get past.


I know. I have to start listening to my body more and giving it what it needs.

Thank you both for the support.



FleaOfTheChill
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18 Apr 2024, 8:16 pm

JustaDude wrote:
I was recently diagnosed with level 2 autism and combined type ADHD. I had researched autism for several years before I felt the need to be tested. I'm still wrapping my head around what it means for me in life and how it has gotten me this point.

At times, I am feeling regressed — like tasks that I used to do without thought seem hard or undoable. I'm pretty sure that I started having an autistic burnout a few months back. I am having breakdowns every now and then which usually come out of nowhere. I want to rest, but feel guilty for not doing more in life besides the chores I am able to take care of.

I know it is pretty subjective, but how long has everyone else's burnouts taken to reset?


Feeling regressed. Yeah. I can relate. I had my major burnout episode late 20's/early 30s. I never fully bounced back from that one. I had so many burnouts before but had no idea that's what was going on with me as I hadn't been dx'd at the time. I could not do now what I did then.

Not to sound pessimistic, but I really never did fully recover. It seems, from what I've read (no data to quote as burnout is apparently a subject that needs waaayyy more attention) from other autistics, the more burnouts you go through, the harder it is to bounce back each time. That's true for me. It takes longer to recover, and you might not reach where you were in regards to things like abilities to handle stress, executive functioning, even things like the ability to retain new info or recall things you knew... so much is impacted. But the key seems to be serious self care and pacing it. Go slow and take baby steps so as to not undo progress. Same as if you have an isolated burnout. That be kind and gentle to you time is so important. I know it can be frustrating to sit and 'do nothing' but reality is by doing that nothing you are doing something that will help you mend.

I feel like I'm rambling. I wish you well in this. I know it's not easy.



goatfish57
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19 Apr 2024, 1:03 pm

@FleaOfTheChill: That was beautiful.


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JustaDude
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19 Apr 2024, 11:51 pm

FleaOfTheChill wrote:
Feeling regressed. Yeah. I can relate. I had my major burnout episode late 20's/early 30s. I never fully bounced back from that one. I had so many burnouts before but had no idea that's what was going on with me as I hadn't been dx'd at the time. I could not do now what I did then.

Not to sound pessimistic, but I really never did fully recover. It seems, from what I've read (no data to quote as burnout is apparently a subject that needs waaayyy more attention) from other autistics, the more burnouts you go through, the harder it is to bounce back each time. That's true for me. It takes longer to recover, and you might not reach where you were in regards to things like abilities to handle stress, executive functioning, even things like the ability to retain new info or recall things you knew... so much is impacted. But the key seems to be serious self care and pacing it. Go slow and take baby steps so as to not undo progress. Same as if you have an isolated burnout. That be kind and gentle to you time is so important. I know it can be frustrating to sit and 'do nothing' but reality is by doing that nothing you are doing something that will help you mend.

I feel like I'm rambling. I wish you well in this. I know it's not easy.


I've been feeling the longer recovery times (now that I can look back and know what was happening). I also feel like my total capacity diminishes each time. At least I know what is going on now and not to force myself to do things that would be counterproductive despite what others around me think I should do.

Thanks for the encouragement. I will have to try to remember that it's a necessity for me to rest more to recover.