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Rattus
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12 Dec 2014, 3:59 am

Does anyone else suffer from significant motion sickness? For me it's largely due to the sensory difficulties that I have which are highly problematic. How do other people manage it? I try hard to be in the front passenger seat in a car because that helps. Trains are alright as long as I am sitting facing forward and preferably on the floor as the outside going past the windows often make me feel unwell. I cannot use the rowing machine easily at the gym because that doesn't make me feel well at all.


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Joe90
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12 Dec 2014, 6:03 am

Motion sickness is a side effect to the antidepressants that I'm on. I say this because I haven't suffered with motion sickness for years, until I started taking antidepressants. But its not the same sort of motion sickness as I used to get as a child. When I was a child I used to physically feel like being sick, like where my mouth would fill up with loads of saliva and my stomach would feel heavy. Now when I get motion sickness, its the opposite, my mouth goes dry and I go all disorientated. Then I get muscle spasms in my throat, causing me to gag but not bring anything up at all, even if I have not long eaten. So I know that I'm not going to be sick. But its still a horrible feeling.


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12 Dec 2014, 6:10 am

I agree it's a nasty feeling. I used to get motion sickness a lot when I was much younger. I found that looking out of the windows eased it. The only recent time I've been troubled with it was on a car journey (back seat) at night after a long plane ride. Couldn't easily hold up my head to look out of the windows, and I couldn't see much when I did. I was transferred to the front seat and given a cold fizzy drink, and soon started feeling better.



Rattus
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12 Dec 2014, 6:47 am

Joe90: That's interesting you say that. Can I ask which antidepressants you are on? I only ask since mine has certainly worsened in the last 5 years but I don't know if it's to do with the ones I am on or whether it's simply down to going in cars a lot less than I did when I lived at home.


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FallingDownMan
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12 Dec 2014, 11:49 am

Motion sickness is something I've dealt with most of my life. As a kid, my mother used to tell me that I was making it up, or put up with it, she never rarely let me sit up front. I found that looking out the side windows was the worse thing I could do. Best thing was looking out the front window. When that isn't possible, try keeping your eyes inside the car. Sugary drinks such as soda only made things worse. For when I motion sick or just nauseous in general these days I use ginger. You can get it in capsule form, tea, or even ginger ale.


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12 Dec 2014, 11:51 am

Ginger. Lots of it. There's ginger chews (which are like candy), there's sushi ginger (thin slices that are either pink or beige), there's even ginger-ale (which isn't as effective, but also adds the liquid consumption which is good and the fizzy aspect which can settle the stomach some).

Seriously -- ginger.


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eggheadjr
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12 Dec 2014, 11:51 am

When I was a little kid I was motion sick quite a bit. Sunday drives were not fun for me. I seemed to grow out of it once I became school age.


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nick007
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12 Dec 2014, 10:38 pm

I used to as a kid but it's not too bad now. I find looking out the window actually made me feel worse. Leaning back & closing my eyes helps some. I also have a med prescribed to take as needed that I only took afew times as an adult but like to have it on hand when traveling by Greyhound across the country to visit my family 2wice a year. I took another med abit as a kid for it.


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ASD_Geek
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12 Dec 2014, 11:02 pm

Yes, I have it pretty bad and have to sit up front or I get pretty ill in no time. My doctor prescribed some medicine that helps with dizziness and nausea. It's for my migraines but works none-the-less. Ginger Ale helps me too.



EzraS
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13 Dec 2014, 2:20 am

Surprisingly I'm impervious to motion sickness.



Sweetleaf
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13 Dec 2014, 2:25 am

My from what I can tell NT sister always had issues with motion sickness, except she liked rollar coasters before me. lol I used to be super afraid of them but eventually got over that. But yeah one time in middle school i signed up for a school trip to california it kind of sucked in retrospect but whatever....anyways at one point we where on a boat in the ocean and some of the other kids where puking and feeling really sick, I got a bit nauseous but not as much as anyone else. So I think perhaps I have a tolerance because it did not bother me near as much. Lol perhaps I would have made a good viking back in the day lol having a super human tolerance to ships being bounced around by water and not getting sick to the point of puking so I would have been quick to battle lol.


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24 Jun 2023, 8:26 pm

I've had significant motion sickness issues since I was a kid. Unlike most people, I rarely get nauseous from motion sickness. My normal symptom is a really bad headache.

Surprisingly, flying in an airplane does not give me motion sickness, nor do trains. Boats are only a trigger in rough conditions. Roller coasters are also not a motion sickness trigger (at least not the headaches or nausea), but I avoid them anyway because I find the g-forces very unpleasant. Last time I rode on one at Busch Gardens, when I got off I was slightly pale in the face and staggering like a drunk.

I have no problem with motion sickness when driving. However, as a passenger I can't read, play video games, etc. I have to be looking out the windows. I can mitigate this slightly by having an A/C vent blowing cool air in my face.

I recently took a vacation that included a lot of winding mountain roads. At the end of the day, I would still have the jerking/rocking sensation from the countless road curves for a couple hours afterwards (I think it's a issue with the g-forces, similiar to a roller coaster). I've been kayaking in choppy water and get a similiar after-effect. I'll get home and be sitting down, but will still feel like I'm rocking/bobbing like I was in the kayak. (I don't think either caused me any motion sickness.)

Many video games cause me motion sickness. It doesn't matter what kind of screen.

Looking through microfilm gives me motion sickness from the way it whirls past.

Movies can give me motion sickness, depending on how they're cut. Quick cuts are not the problem; camera movement is the problem. Some shaky-cam action is okay. The Blair Witch Project was a nightmare. Besides Blair, one of the worst I can remember is a simple scene in The Wrestler. Two characters are standing, looking at each other, and having a conversation. Instead of a single wide shot or cutting back and forth, the camera actually pans back and forth between the two character's faces. Nearly caused me to walk out because of how badly it triggered my motion sickness. YouTube documentary channels that use a lot of handheld shots (ex: Smarter Every Day) are also a trigger.

I am very nearsighted and I suspect that may make my motion sickness susceptibility worse.

livnah wrote:
Ginger. Lots of it. There's ginger chews (which are like candy), there's sushi ginger (thin slices that are either pink or beige), there's even ginger-ale (which isn't as effective, but also adds the liquid consumption which is good and the fizzy aspect which can settle the stomach some).

Seriously -- ginger.


I was on a boat trip in rough seas. Almost everybody was getting seasick to some degree. Someone thoughtfully passed around ginger cookies. I could only take one bite; they actually made me feel more nauseous.

Dramamine usually works well for me, although I rarely have it available because I rarely known in advance when I'm going to need it.



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24 Jun 2023, 8:36 pm

It's been an occasional problem for me. I never figured out how to handle it aside from just suffering.


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nick007
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25 Jun 2023, 3:12 am

As a kid my motion sickness was mostly related to cars & the driving conditions. When I was in 5th grade me & my parents took a road trip to the mountains & I vomited a bit going up & down on winding roads. We went on a similar trip a couple years later & my doc prescribed me a med & I did not vomit.

I've been living in Vermont for the last 10 & half years & I don't go to a lot of places but I do go on hills some by bus & I'm usually OK. Fast driving with sudden breaking can make me feel queasy & hot thou, especially when on steeper hills & closing my eyes helps some. Reading is a bit iffy. Sometimes I can read things on my phone for an hour & feel OK. Other times thou after a few minutes of reading I suddenly start feeling very hot & my stomach starts feeling weird so I stop reading & I'm OK shortly after we stop & I get out. A year ago I took a two day train trip to visit my parents & I had some prescribed Meclizine that I took & I was fine. Meclizine might not require a prescription but I'm not sure.

I occasionally feel queasy in fast elevators but I'm fine within a couple minutes afterwards. I've been on a roller coaster ride 1ce as a kid when we went to Disney World & I felt sick but luckily I did not vomit.

I've been boating some as a kid & I've been on choppy water some & I don't recall having any problems. However I've been on a med that made me feel seasick before when I woke up in bed. It was the med Loniten which is the oral form of Minoxidil. The topical formation is Rogaine which is used for male-pattern baldness. Loniten is an old med to reduce blood pressure that had a side-effect of hair growth. I tried taking a low dose of Loniten to help with male-pattern baldness. I was fine that day but I woke up the next day feeling like my bed was rocking back & forth & I was rolling around on my bed like it was. I looked at something on my dresser & it was moving around a lot like watching from a small boat in extremely choppy water. I also felt sick to my stomach. I managed to fall back asleep after a bit & was OK when I woke up. I never took Loniten since. Rogaine never affected me negatively. Interestingly I've been taking the blood pressure med Propranolol the last few years for essential tremors & I never had that Loniten reaction.

This may not be related to motion sickness at all but I'm not sure. I vomited sometimes on the way to school when I woke up feeling slightly ill so my parents quickly learned to not send me to school when I said I was feeling bad. Most of those times that I didn't go to school when I was feeling bad, I would not vomit if I stayed home or if I went to my grandparents who were 10 minutes away & I would usually feel fine a couple hours later. Perhaps that was some kinda stress reaction & the car rides to school which were longer than my grandparents along with the stress of knowing I was going to school triggered the vomiting :shrug:


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bee33
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25 Jun 2023, 6:38 am

I used to have really bad motion sickness before puberty, pretty much throwing up or feeling constantly nauseous on nearly every car trip. It's much better now but I still get it sometimes.

When I used to frequently take a two-hour bus trip in the last 20 years I always had to sit in the most forward seat, and then I would still sometimes feel nauseous. It was especially bad if we were going around a long winding turn, and I found that it helped to keep staring at the same point on the bus windshield, so my eyes were not following the turn but staying fixed. I also found some relief from applying pressure to the inside of my wrist. This is a specific technique: https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patie ... d-vomiting

Not having recently eaten also helped. And getting air. Buses sometimes have an small fan you can turn on in the console above the seat, and in a car you can either open the window or blow stronger (cool) air from the vent.

I can't read at all when I am in a car or bus, not even glancing down for a moment or it makes me feel queasy almost right away.

Is this related to ASD?



ichichichi
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25 Jun 2023, 7:53 am

Sitting back and keeping your body still helps, especially your head should not move. Preferably close your eyes too but if you can't, then try to minimalize your eye movements. Lock your sight in one spot that is ahead of you, try not to look backwards. Also don't read things, including road signs.

If it doesn't help some calming antihistamines or certain travel sickness meds can help...

Make sure you have plenty of air, travelling on a neither empty nor stuffed stomach. And if you are feeling sick already, you can try having a little bit of plain, white yoghurt (no sugar or flavoring, can add a little bit of salt to raise your blood pressure if you have issues with that).

Ask people that sit close to you not to put on scents.

Hope any of this helps, motion sickness is just awful...