Did anyone ever have an aversion to certain words?

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WildMan
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17 Oct 2007, 4:17 am

Words that make me grind my teeth are: community (as in, the [fill in the blank] community), glocal (local reactions to global economic/cultural forces), queering (the queering of...), gendered or gendering, speech (gendered speech, queered speech, postcolonial speech, etc.), and so on.

Maybe it's because I'm an academic in the social sciences/liberal arts. But words like that seem contrived and usually imply that the person throwing those terms around like it's second nature is not that much fun to bull**** with at the bar after work.



Othila
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17 Oct 2007, 6:17 am

Quote:
hartzofspace wrote:
I hate it when people spell because as cuz. I actually feel ill, as if I'd stepped into something icky! :x


Come on cuz is a great word. How can you hate the "Z"?

I hate any word that has "pant" in it. I think it is the ugliest sound on the planet.



9CatMom
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17 Oct 2007, 9:06 am

Co-morbid, with its association with death. The term is useful with some physical problems (obesity linked with heart disease and diabetes, for example), but with AS and related difficulties, co-existing conditions is a better term.



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17 Oct 2007, 9:11 am

As a kid, I was terrified of words containing (especially beginning with) the letter B. I associated it with bomb and ball. However, that was probably my comorbid OCD than the AS itself.


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hartzofspace
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17 Oct 2007, 2:47 pm

Othila wrote:
Quote:
hartzofspace wrote:
I hate it when people spell because as cuz. I actually feel ill, as if I'd stepped into something icky! :x


Come on cuz is a great word. How can you hate the "Z"?

I hate any word that has "pant" in it. I think it is the ugliest sound on the planet.


I like the "Z." I just hate that word.


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ixochiyo_yohuallan
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17 Oct 2007, 2:50 pm

I don't seem to remember having an aversion to any specific words as such. But I do remember disliking practically any words related to stickiness, such as "tar", "glue", "get stuck" (I probably was disgusted by the feel of anything sticky, and by gooey, thick, viscous textures). There seemed to be an almost taboo quality about them, and I developed a type of ritual to use whenever someone uttered them or I did - I would say "to yest" ("or, rather", "in other words") to myself every time I heard them. If something went wrong and I couldn't follow through the ritual as I felt I had to, say, if someone distracted me and I forgot I had to do the ritual for a while, I would say "to yest - proshloe" (in other words - past) or "to yest - pochti proshloe" (in other words - almost past). From what little I remember, I could get pretty caught up in this.

I also vaguely remember some words sounding odd or funny, in a sense, and I repeating them to distraction, as if trying to penetrate into the meaning of the word and find out what the oddness or fun was all about. I would do this until the word appeared to altogether lose any meaning and become a mere conglomeration of sounds. Then I would rest and start over. One thing I remember now is me walking with someone along one of the streets near to our old apartment, and repeating one such word, "ponaroshku" (not for real, as an act, in jest), in a whisper. It, too, sounded odd and funny and brought the most incongruous association - it looked like one of those white plastic spoons that come with children's tea sets, with three triangular prongs. I repeated it almost obsessively, trying to absorb every sound, until I could no longer make out what the sounds meant when taken together. Then I thought, "ponaroshku", "ponaroshku" - what is "ponaroshku"? It was weird. (I still do this a little occasionally, just not to such an extent).

I must have been small then, younger than seven at any rate.



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17 Oct 2007, 3:34 pm

hoity toity

hokey pokey

circumcision



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17 Oct 2007, 3:51 pm

I never had an aversion to a word, that I can recall right now anyway, but I used to become obsessed with certain words. Particularly candelabra. Persnickety. There's lots more. Anything that feels good to say. Mmm... Cellar door, too.


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17 Oct 2007, 4:50 pm

jjstar wrote:
*like* as in *I was like going to call you, but like my brother asked me to like help him with his homework*


You would hate talking to me face to face, because I tend to talk that way a lot.



becca423b
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17 Oct 2007, 5:37 pm

"moist" and "slough" EUWwww...I don't know why but they just make me cringe!

Also: does anyone else say like and um way, way too much? I absolutely hate it when people abuse these words, but when I get nervous, I spit out "like" about every other word! I know it sounds terrible, but I can't seem to help it!



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18 Oct 2007, 7:51 am

ixochiyo_yohuallan wrote:
I don't seem to remember having an aversion to any specific words as such. But I do remember disliking practically any words related to stickiness, such as "tar", "glue", "get stuck" (I probably was disgusted by the feel of anything sticky, and by gooey, thick, viscous textures). There seemed to be an almost taboo quality about them, and I developed a type of ritual to use whenever someone uttered them or I did - I would say "to yest" ("or, rather", "in other words") to myself every time I heard them. If something went wrong and I couldn't follow through the ritual as I felt I had to, say, if someone distracted me and I forgot I had to do the ritual for a while, I would say "to yest - proshloe" (in other words - past) or "to yest - pochti proshloe" (in other words - almost past). From what little I remember, I could get pretty caught up in this.

I also vaguely remember some words sounding odd or funny, in a sense, and I repeating them to distraction, as if trying to penetrate into the meaning of the word and find out what the oddness or fun was all about. I would do this until the word appeared to altogether lose any meaning and become a mere conglomeration of sounds. Then I would rest and start over. One thing I remember now is me walking with someone along one of the streets near to our old apartment, and repeating one such word, "ponaroshku" (not for real, as an act, in jest), in a whisper. It, too, sounded odd and funny and brought the most incongruous association - it looked like one of those white plastic spoons that come with children's tea sets, with three triangular prongs. I repeated it almost obsessively, trying to absorb every sound, until I could no longer make out what the sounds meant when taken together. Then I thought, "ponaroshku", "ponaroshku" - what is "ponaroshku"? It was weird. (I still do this a little occasionally, just not to such an extent).

I must have been small then, younger than seven at any rate.


Ixochiyo_yohuallan, what's your mother tongue?

Yes, I know that thing with thinking a word over and over until it sounds really weird and without meaning. ;)



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18 Oct 2007, 7:53 am

becca423b wrote:
"moist" and "slough" EUWwww...I don't know why but they just make me cringe!

Also: does anyone else say like and um way, way too much? I absolutely hate it when people abuse these words, but when I get nervous, I spit out "like" about every other word! I know it sounds terrible, but I can't seem to help it!


I looooove the word "moist" (just the sound, again). LOL I too say "like" and "um" way too may times in a day, but casual use of polysyllabic words may help to balance that.

Okay, this is a fantastic thread, but I just wanted to add that I was obsessing about having used the word "iam" in a previous post (misspelled, even) when I meant trochee! Aaaargh!



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18 Oct 2007, 9:03 am

"Vomit," "urinate," etc. They may be the proper medical terms, but I usually think "barf," "pee," or just plain "throw up" are sufficient.



ixochiyo_yohuallan
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18 Oct 2007, 12:39 pm

AnnePande wrote:

Ixochiyo_yohuallan, what's your mother tongue?

Yes, I know that thing with thinking a word over and over until it sounds really weird and without meaning. ;)


Russian. :)



AnnePande
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18 Oct 2007, 12:44 pm

ixochiyo_yohuallan wrote:
AnnePande wrote:

Ixochiyo_yohuallan, what's your mother tongue?

Yes, I know that thing with thinking a word over and over until it sounds really weird and without meaning. ;)


Russian. :)


Okay, I wondered what kind of words it was you were writing. :)